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Spy Kids 4: All the Time in the World 4D

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

In director/writer Robert Rodriguez’ fourth installment of the “Spy Kids” franchise we have a new spy family headed by step-mom Marissa (Jessica Alba) and Wilbur (Joel McHale). His two kids are twins Rebecca and Cecil ( for the entire cast see the Internet Movie Database http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1517489/).
 
Marissa is a real-life sky who is pregnant with her first child. Her step-daughter,  Rebecca does not like her but Cecil does. Wilbur works in television and is trying to create a spy show.
 
Marissa works up until giving birth. After two years her boss at the OSS (Organization for Super Spies) needs her to come back because someone or thing is making time speed up and they must stop it.
 
It all gets very complicated.  Time is of the utmost importance! Carmen and Junie are Marissa’s niece and nephew, but the siblings have not gotten along for some time. Carmen takes Rebecca and Cecil under her wing at the OSS, but the kids manage to make a significant contribution to identifying and bringing down the bad guy with the help of Junie, and of course, mom and dad. It’s a family affair.
 
The film isn’t about bringing down a bad guy, however. It’s about why the man wants to control time, his regrets over the past, and his love for his father.
 
But what does “4D”, or four dimension, mean? You might recall the 2003 film “Rugrats Go Wild” that was also “4D”. The dimension of smell is added to 3D (so you still need the glasses) through “scratch and sniff” cards. At the salient moment in the movie, a number flashes indicating its time to scratch and sniff that spot on the card. I went to a 2D version of the movie, but the 4D was explained at the beginning, and we saw the numbers appear. I think that flatulence only occurs once out of eight opportunities to share cinematic smell space.

“Spy Kids 4: All the Time in the World” is a sturdy family film but it felt like the special effects outweighed the plot and certainly the dialogue. The good news is it is better than the comic books into film we have been getting, with more discernment about the situation that the simplistic good vs. evil.




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Augustine of Canterbury: In the year 596, some 40 monks set out from Rome to evangelize the Anglo-Saxons in England. Leading the group was Augustine, the prior of their monastery in Rome. Hardly had he and his men reached Gaul (France) when they heard stories of the ferocity of the Anglo-Saxons and of the treacherous waters of the English Channel. Augustine returned to Rome and to the pope who had sent them—St. Gregory the Great (September 3 )—only to be assured by him that their fears were groundless. 
<p>Augustine again set out. This time the group crossed the English Channel and landed in the territory of Kent, ruled by King Ethelbert, a pagan married to a Christian, Bertha. Ethelbert received them kindly, set up a residence for them in Canterbury and within the year, on Pentecost Sunday, 597, was himself baptized. After being consecrated a bishop in France, Augustine returned to Canterbury, where he founded his see. He constructed a church and monastery near where the present cathedral, begun in 1070, now stands. As the faith spread, additional sees were established at London and Rochester. </p><p>Work was sometimes slow and Augustine did not always meet with success. Attempts to reconcile the Anglo-Saxon Christians with the original Briton Christians (who had been driven into western England by Anglo-Saxon invaders) ended in dismal failure. Augustine failed to convince the Britons to give up certain Celtic customs at variance with Rome and to forget their bitterness, helping him evangelize their Anglo-Saxon conquerors </p><p>Laboring patiently, Augustine wisely heeded the missionary principles—quite enlightened for the times—suggested by Pope Gregory the Great: purify rather than destroy pagan temples and customs; let pagan rites and festivals be transformed into Christian feasts; retain local customs as far as possible. The limited success Augustine achieved in England before his death in 605, a short eight years after he arrived in England, would eventually bear fruit long after in the conversion of England. Augustine of Canterbury can truly be called the “Apostle of England.”</p> American Catholic Blog A hero isn’t someone born with unconquerable strength and selflessness. Heroes are not formed in a cataclysmic instant. Heroism is developed over time, one decision after another, moment by moment, formed by a deliberate, chosen, and habitual response to life.

Divine Science Michael Dennin

 
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