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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Glee The 3D Concert Movie

By
Joseph McAleer
Source: Catholic News Service

One of the more popular television programs of recent years leaps to the big screen with "Glee The 3D Concert Movie" (Fox), a documentary-style look at a live-performance tour by the show's ensemble that comes complete with backstage drama, screaming fans and some very loud music.

While its overarching message of love and tolerance may be well-intentioned, however, as directed by MTV veteran Kevin Tancharoen, "Glee" takes its hallmark "anything goes" attitude to moral excess by its endorsement of the homosexual lifestyle.

On the surface, the film, like its TV counterpart, appears to be innocent karaoke, with fresh-faced "teens" (most of them, in reality, well past high school age) expressing their inner angst and searching for acceptance by singing cover versions of popular songs by everyone from the Beatles to Barbra Streisand, Katy Perry and Lady Gaga.

More disturbingly, interspersed with the musical numbers are profiles of dedicated fans, called "Gleeks," whose lives have supposedly been transformed and given meaning by the show. These include a gay teen who is cruelly outed by his school fellows, and a perky dwarf cheerleader whose small stature proves no bar to becoming prom queen.

For Gleeks, we learn, "Glee" is their religion, a politically correct gospel of universal acceptance. Anyone can be a Gleek, regardless of race, gender, disability or sexual orientation. No one is a loser; everyone wins and takes center stage in life.

While obviously not a substitute for real faith, this credo could be, within proper limits, a good ethical message to instill in impressionable young people. But the inclusion of homosexuality among the categories by which teens are to be both defined and affirmed blurs the line between upholding the dignity of the individual and recognizing that certain sexual behavior must be rejected as immoral since, by its very nature, it detracts from the fullness of that same dignity.

While insisting on compassion and support for those with same-sex attraction, and condemning discrimination against them as individuals, the Catholic Church, in its faithfulness to Scripture and tradition, cannot condone—much less celebrate, as this movie does—the misguided choice to follow through on such an attraction.

The film contains explicit endorsement of the homosexual lifestyle as well as some provocative lyrics and dancing. The Catholic News Service classification is O—morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG—parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.





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Rose of Lima: The first canonized saint of the New World has one characteristic of all saints—the suffering of opposition—and another characteristic which is more for admiration than for imitation—excessive practice of mortification. 
<p>She was born to parents of Spanish descent in Lima, Peru, at a time when South America was in its first century of evangelization. She seems to have taken Catherine of Siena (April 29) as a model, in spite of the objections and ridicule of parents and friends. </p><p>The saints have so great a love of God that what seems bizarre to us, and is indeed sometimes imprudent, is simply a logical carrying out of a conviction that anything that might endanger a loving relationship with God must be rooted out. So, because her beauty was so often admired, Rose used to rub her face with pepper to produce disfiguring blotches. Later, she wore a thick circlet of silver on her head, studded on the inside, like a crown of thorns. </p><p>When her parents fell into financial trouble, she worked in the garden all day and sewed at night. Ten years of struggle against her parents began when they tried to make Rose marry. They refused to let her enter a convent, and out of obedience she continued her life of penance and solitude at home as a member of the Third Order of St. Dominic. So deep was her desire to live the life of Christ that she spent most of her time at home in solitude. </p><p>During the last few years of her life, Rose set up a room in the house where she cared for homeless children, the elderly and the sick. This was a beginning of social services in Peru. Though secluded in life and activity, she was brought to the attention of Inquisition interrogators, who could only say that she was influenced by grace. </p><p>What might have been a merely eccentric life was transfigured from the inside. If we remember some unusual penances, we should also remember the greatest thing about Rose: a love of God so ardent that it withstood ridicule from without, violent temptation and lengthy periods of sickness. When she died at 31, the city turned out for her funeral. Prominent men took turns carrying her coffin.</p> American Catholic Blog Never be in a hurry; do everything quietly and in a calm spirit. Do not lose your inner peace for anything whatsoever, even if your whole worlds seems upset. <br />–St. Francis de Sales

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