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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Glee The 3D Concert Movie

By
Joseph McAleer
Source: Catholic News Service

One of the more popular television programs of recent years leaps to the big screen with "Glee The 3D Concert Movie" (Fox), a documentary-style look at a live-performance tour by the show's ensemble that comes complete with backstage drama, screaming fans and some very loud music.

While its overarching message of love and tolerance may be well-intentioned, however, as directed by MTV veteran Kevin Tancharoen, "Glee" takes its hallmark "anything goes" attitude to moral excess by its endorsement of the homosexual lifestyle.

On the surface, the film, like its TV counterpart, appears to be innocent karaoke, with fresh-faced "teens" (most of them, in reality, well past high school age) expressing their inner angst and searching for acceptance by singing cover versions of popular songs by everyone from the Beatles to Barbra Streisand, Katy Perry and Lady Gaga.

More disturbingly, interspersed with the musical numbers are profiles of dedicated fans, called "Gleeks," whose lives have supposedly been transformed and given meaning by the show. These include a gay teen who is cruelly outed by his school fellows, and a perky dwarf cheerleader whose small stature proves no bar to becoming prom queen.

For Gleeks, we learn, "Glee" is their religion, a politically correct gospel of universal acceptance. Anyone can be a Gleek, regardless of race, gender, disability or sexual orientation. No one is a loser; everyone wins and takes center stage in life.

While obviously not a substitute for real faith, this credo could be, within proper limits, a good ethical message to instill in impressionable young people. But the inclusion of homosexuality among the categories by which teens are to be both defined and affirmed blurs the line between upholding the dignity of the individual and recognizing that certain sexual behavior must be rejected as immoral since, by its very nature, it detracts from the fullness of that same dignity.

While insisting on compassion and support for those with same-sex attraction, and condemning discrimination against them as individuals, the Catholic Church, in its faithfulness to Scripture and tradition, cannot condone—much less celebrate, as this movie does—the misguided choice to follow through on such an attraction.

The film contains explicit endorsement of the homosexual lifestyle as well as some provocative lyrics and dancing. The Catholic News Service classification is O—morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG—parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.



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Mary Magdalene: Except for the mother of Jesus, few women are more honored in the Bible than Mary Magdalene. Yet she could well be the patron of the slandered, since there has been a persistent legend in the Church that she is the unnamed sinful woman who anointed the feet of Jesus in Luke 7:36-50. 
<p>Most Scripture scholars today point out that there is no scriptural basis for confusing the two women. Mary Magdalene, that is, “of Magdala,” was the one from whom Christ cast out “seven demons” (Luke 8:2)—an indication, at the worst, of extreme demonic possession or, possibly, severe illness. </p><p>Father Wilfrid J. Harrington, O.P., writing in the <i>New Catholic Commentary</i>, says that “seven demons” “does not mean that Mary had lived an immoral life—a conclusion reached only by means of a mistaken identification with the anonymous woman of Luke 7:36.” Father Edward Mally, S.J., writing in the <i>Jerome Biblical Commentary,</i> agrees that she “is not...the same as the sinner of Luke 7:37, despite the later Western romantic tradition about her.” </p><p>Mary Magdalene was one of the many “who were assisting them [Jesus and the Twelve] out of their means.” She was one of those who stood by the cross of Jesus with his mother. And, of all the “official” witnesses that might have been chosen for the first awareness of the Resurrection, she was the one to whom that privilege was given. She is known as the "Apostle to the Apostles."</p> American Catholic Blog Jesus does not save us as individuals, but as members of His Body. We are not just people—unconnected and isolated arms and legs. We are a people—in fact, the People of God.

 
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