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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Glee The 3D Concert Movie

By
Joseph McAleer
Source: Catholic News Service

One of the more popular television programs of recent years leaps to the big screen with "Glee The 3D Concert Movie" (Fox), a documentary-style look at a live-performance tour by the show's ensemble that comes complete with backstage drama, screaming fans and some very loud music.

While its overarching message of love and tolerance may be well-intentioned, however, as directed by MTV veteran Kevin Tancharoen, "Glee" takes its hallmark "anything goes" attitude to moral excess by its endorsement of the homosexual lifestyle.

On the surface, the film, like its TV counterpart, appears to be innocent karaoke, with fresh-faced "teens" (most of them, in reality, well past high school age) expressing their inner angst and searching for acceptance by singing cover versions of popular songs by everyone from the Beatles to Barbra Streisand, Katy Perry and Lady Gaga.

More disturbingly, interspersed with the musical numbers are profiles of dedicated fans, called "Gleeks," whose lives have supposedly been transformed and given meaning by the show. These include a gay teen who is cruelly outed by his school fellows, and a perky dwarf cheerleader whose small stature proves no bar to becoming prom queen.

For Gleeks, we learn, "Glee" is their religion, a politically correct gospel of universal acceptance. Anyone can be a Gleek, regardless of race, gender, disability or sexual orientation. No one is a loser; everyone wins and takes center stage in life.

While obviously not a substitute for real faith, this credo could be, within proper limits, a good ethical message to instill in impressionable young people. But the inclusion of homosexuality among the categories by which teens are to be both defined and affirmed blurs the line between upholding the dignity of the individual and recognizing that certain sexual behavior must be rejected as immoral since, by its very nature, it detracts from the fullness of that same dignity.

While insisting on compassion and support for those with same-sex attraction, and condemning discrimination against them as individuals, the Catholic Church, in its faithfulness to Scripture and tradition, cannot condone—much less celebrate, as this movie does—the misguided choice to follow through on such an attraction.

The film contains explicit endorsement of the homosexual lifestyle as well as some provocative lyrics and dancing. The Catholic News Service classification is O—morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG—parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.



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Madeleine Sophie Barat: The legacy of Madeleine Sophie Barat can be found in the more than 100 schools operated by her Society of the Sacred Heart, institutions known for the quality of the education made available to the young. 
<p>Sophie herself received an extensive education, thanks to her brother, Louis, 11 years older and her godfather at Baptism. Himself a seminarian, he decided that his younger sister would likewise learn Latin, Greek, history, physics and mathematics—always without interruption and with a minimum of companionship. By age 15, she had received a thorough exposure to the Bible, the teachings of the Fathers of the Church and theology. Despite the oppressive regime Louis imposed, young Sophie thrived and developed a genuine love of learning. </p><p>Meanwhile, this was the time of the French Revolution and of the suppression of Christian schools. The education of the young, particularly young girls, was in a troubled state. At the same time, Sophie, who had concluded that she was called to the religious life, was persuaded to begin her life as a nun and as a teacher. She founded the Society of the Sacred Heart, which would focus on schools for the poor as well as boarding schools for young women of means; today, co-ed Sacred Heart schools can be found as well as schools exclusively for boys. </p><p>In 1826, her Society of the Sacred Heart received formal papal approval. By then she had served as superior at a number of convents. In 1865, she was stricken with paralysis; she died that year on the feast of the Ascension. </p><p>Madeleine Sophie Barat was canonized in 1925.</p> American Catholic Blog When you go to Jesus, you’re not going to a God who only knows heaven; instead, you’re placing your hurting heart into pierced hands that understand both the pain of suffering and the glory of redemption.

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