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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Sholem Aleichem: Laughing in the Darkness

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

As the ad says, before there was “Fiddler on the Roof” there was Sholem Aleichem, the Yiddish storyteller whose takes of Tevye the Dairyman were the inspiration for the beloved award-winning musical and film.  Sholem Aleichem was the pen name for Solomon Naumovich Rabinovic who was born in the Ukraine in 1859 and died in New York in 1916.

This new documentary by Joseph Dorman is filled with photographs and images that tell Sholem’s story, but it also recounts in vivid detail and image the story of Eastern European Jewry in the late 19th century and their efforts to join the modern world. The experts who comment are informed and enthusiastic about their subject, but none more so than his granddaughter, Bel Kaufman, who was five years old and still living in Russia, when her grandfather died.
 
Sholem Aleichem’s legacy is that he helped create the Yiddish press and preserve a culture often looked down upon by some moderns who wish to speak only Hebrew.  Although written in the Hebrew alphabet, Yiddish is a fusion of high German, Russian,  Aramiac and the Romance languages.  It is spoken by Orthodox Jews and within Hasidic communities.
 
The documentary also traces Jewish life and history in the Russian Pale, or Jewish settlements confined to areas by the Czars and where pogroms were often carried out.
 
Sholem went through many fortunes in his life and he created the character Tevye, the milkman, to have someone to talk to. There is a deep irony to Sholem’s life and writings. And many parts of the film made me laugh. For example, when Sholem’s mother died, his father sought a new wife. However, he had twelve children, so he parceled them out to neighbors and once he was firmly remarried, he brought them home one or two at a time, so she had to take care of them.
 
If you are a student of humanity, religion, history, literature or theater, I hope you will have the opportunity to enjoy this film.

Click here for a list of screenings of this film.




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Madeleine Sophie Barat: The legacy of Madeleine Sophie Barat can be found in the more than 100 schools operated by her Society of the Sacred Heart, institutions known for the quality of the education made available to the young. 
<p>Sophie herself received an extensive education, thanks to her brother, Louis, 11 years older and her godfather at Baptism. Himself a seminarian, he decided that his younger sister would likewise learn Latin, Greek, history, physics and mathematics—always without interruption and with a minimum of companionship. By age 15, she had received a thorough exposure to the Bible, the teachings of the Fathers of the Church and theology. Despite the oppressive regime Louis imposed, young Sophie thrived and developed a genuine love of learning. </p><p>Meanwhile, this was the time of the French Revolution and of the suppression of Christian schools. The education of the young, particularly young girls, was in a troubled state. At the same time, Sophie, who had concluded that she was called to the religious life, was persuaded to begin her life as a nun and as a teacher. She founded the Society of the Sacred Heart, which would focus on schools for the poor as well as boarding schools for young women of means; today, co-ed Sacred Heart schools can be found as well as schools exclusively for boys. </p><p>In 1826, her Society of the Sacred Heart received formal papal approval. By then she had served as superior at a number of convents. In 1865, she was stricken with paralysis; she died that year on the feast of the Ascension. </p><p>Madeleine Sophie Barat was canonized in 1925.</p> American Catholic Blog Where we spend eternity is 100 percent under our control. God’s Word makes our options very clear: we can cooperate with the grace that Christ merited for us on the cross, or we can reject it and keep to our own course.

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