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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Rise of the Planet of the Apes

By
Joseph McAleer
Source: Catholic News Service


A digitally created ape named Caesar and actor James Franco are pictured in a scene from the movie "Rise of the Planet of the Apes."
Monkey business turns serious—and rather deadly—in "Rise of the Planet of the Apes" (Fox), the latest iteration of the successful screen franchise based on the science fiction of French novelist Pierre Boulle (1912-1994). In this go-round, directed by Rupert Wyatt, there's a genetic manipulation twist and yet another warning that it's not nice to fool with Mother Nature.

Since this is a prequel set in modern-day San Francisco, instead of Charlton Heston in a loincloth, we have James Franco in a lab coat. He plays Will Rodman, a master geneticist who believes he has found the cure for Alzheimer's disease: Under his treatment, his primate test subjects show remarkable improvement in both health and intelligence.

Will's motivation is partly financial—his research is fueled by greedy corporate backers—and partly personal since his father, Charles (John Lithgow), is dying from the illness.

Alas, there's that one nasty side effect to Will's therapy—extreme aggression—and when the apes run amok, the project is canceled and the animals are euthanized. All but one, of course -- a baby chimp named Caesar. Will brings him home to continue his research on the sly. He also casts medical ethics aside and tests the drug on dear old Dad, who gets better...for a while.

The years pass, and Caesar grows into a brilliant teen ape who comes to resent the confines of his cage, yearning to be free. Before long he needs anger management classes, and the animal control agents are summoned. Imprisoned with his own kind, Caesar comes face to face with his destiny.

While this is primarily an action film intended to divert summer moviegoers, it's also a cautionary tale about the potentially disastrous results of attempting to achieve a good end through morally unmoored scientific means. Unfortunately, that's a theme with considerable real-world resonance, as viewers concerned about such life-destroying procedures as embryonic stem cell research will easily recognize.

"Rise of the Planet of the Apes" stands head and shoulders above its sister films in its depiction of the titular species. In lieu of Roddy McDowall in a monkey suit, we have the wonders of computer-generated imagery and performance capture—technologies especially effective in the case of Andy Serkis as Caesar.

Having honed his talents as Gollum in the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy and as King Kong himself, Serkis imparts an astonishing array of emotions, depth of personality, and even pathos to the chimp who is destined to rule over man.

In the end, hubristic humanity learns too late the wisdom expressed by comely veterinarian Caroline (Freida Pinto) when she tells Will, "Sometimes things aren't meant to be changed."

Score it Simians 1, Misguided Science 0.

The film contains intense and bloody action violence, including animal attacks, gunplay and moments of terror, and implied premarital sexual activity. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III—adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13—parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

*****
Joseph McAleer is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.



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Fidelis of Sigmaringen: If a poor man needed some clothing, Fidelis would often give the man the clothes right off his back. Complete generosity to others characterized this saint's life. 
<p>Born in 1577, Mark Rey (Fidelis was his religious name) became a lawyer who constantly upheld the causes of the poor and oppressed people. Nicknamed "the poor man's lawyer," Fidelis soon grew disgusted with the corruption and injustice he saw among his colleagues. He left his law career to become a priest, joining his brother George as a member of the Capuchin Order. His wealth was divided between needy seminarians and the poor. </p><p>As a follower of Francis, Fidelis continued his devotion to the weak and needy. During a severe epidemic in a city where he was guardian of a friary, Fidelis cared for and cured many sick soldiers. </p><p>He was appointed head of a group of Capuchins sent to preach against the Calvinists and Zwinglians in Switzerland. Almost certain violence threatened. Those who observed the mission felt that success was more attributable to the prayer of Fidelis during the night than to his sermons and instructions. </p><p>He was accused of opposing the peasants' national aspirations for independence from Austria. While he was preaching at Seewis, to which he had gone against the advice of his friends, a gun was fired at him, but he escaped unharmed. A Protestant offered to shelter Fidelis, but he declined, saying his life was in God's hands. On the road back, he was set upon by a group of armed men and killed. </p><p>He was canonized in 1746. Fifteen years later, the Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith, which was established in 1622, recognized him as its first martyr.</p> American Catholic Blog Obedience means total surrender and wholehearted free service to the poorest of the poor. All the difficulties that come in our work are the result of disobedience.

 
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