AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

The Change-Up

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service

"The Change-Up" (Universal) constitutes a raunchy comic riff on the age-old switched-identities premise, a fetid "Freaky Friday" calculated to please only those sophomoric moviegoers who thrill at having their sensibilities assaulted by what they see on screen.

That onslaught begins betimes as we're introduced to the home life of diligent but beleaguered husband and dad Dave Lockwood (Jason Bateman). Dave's sleepy middle-of-the-night effort to get his baby's diaper changed turns into the kind of revolting misadventure that might keep a somewhat backward fourth grader in stitches.

And speaking of underachieving grade schoolers, enter Dave's foil, and best friends since childhood, Mitch Planko (Ryan Reynolds). A commitment-phobic ne'er-do-well, Mitch drifts his days away with nary a care, but nonetheless envies Dave's role as a family man. And Dave, of course, reciprocates by yearning for the freedom Mitch enjoys.

When, after a night out on the town together, the two pals simultaneously give vent to their mutual jealousy while using a local fountain as a urinal—a characteristic touch—we're on to the fact, if they aren't, that tomorrow they'll wake up inhabiting each other's bodies.

For Dave that means keeping Mitch's appointment on the set of a "lorn," i.e., "light porn" movie, where he cavorts with fellow cast members of both sexes. For Mitch it involves failing spectacularly to fit in at Dave's button-down law firm, then returning home to find his long-standing ardor for Dave's wife, Jamie (Leslie Mann), suddenly cooled by her noisy, open-door use of their en suite bathroom.

And so it goes. Mitch, it emerges, has an aberrant taste for expectant mothers, a jones he indulges by trolling for talent at Lamaze classes. Dave's more orthodox appetites have him using his new persona to chase fetching law office associate Sabrina (Olivia Wilde) after whom he has long lusted.

With exquisite casuistry, Dave reasons that sleeping with Sabrina won't count as cheating on Jamie as long as he uses Mitch's body to do it.

By the time we get to an extended, late-reel joke wherein Mitch, as Dave, compares the closing of an important business deal to the successful seduction of a Catholic schoolgirl, the wearied viewer is almost too numb to be offended. Almost.

As helmed by David Dobkin, this puerile mess amounts to little more than yet another tiresome attempt to expand the boundaries of bad taste.

The film contains graphic nonmarital sexual activity, masturbation, upper female and rear nudity, drug use, repulsive scatological humor, several uses of profanity, and pervasive rough and crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is O—morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R—restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

*****
John Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.



Search reviews at CatholicMovieReviews.org


Thank you for your comments. Editors will review all posts before they are visible on the website.

blog comments powered by Disqus







Cyril and Methodius: Because their father was an officer in a part of Greece inhabited by many Slavs, these two Greek brothers ultimately became missionaries, teachers and patrons of the Slavic peoples. 
<p>After a brilliant course of studies, Cyril (called Constantine until he became a monk shortly before his death) refused the governorship of a district such as his brother had accepted among the Slavic-speaking population. Cyril withdrew to a monastery where his brother Methodius had become a monk after some years in a governmental post. </p><p>A decisive change in their lives occurred when the Duke of Moravia (present-day Czech Republic) asked the Eastern Emperor Michael for political independence from German rule and ecclesiastical autonomy (having their own clergy and liturgy). Cyril and Methodius undertook the missionary task. </p><p>Cyril’s first work was to invent an alphabet, still used in some Eastern liturgies. His followers probably formed the Cyrillic alphabet (for example, modern Russian) from Greek capital letters. Together they translated the Gospels, the psalter, Paul’s letters and the liturgical books into Slavonic, and composed a Slavonic liturgy, highly irregular then. </p><p>That and their free use of the vernacular in preaching led to opposition from the German clergy. The bishop refused to consecrate Slavic bishops and priests, and Cyril was forced to appeal to Rome. On the visit to Rome, he and Methodius had the joy of seeing their new liturgy approved by Pope Adrian II. Cyril, long an invalid, died in Rome 50 days after taking the monastic habit. </p><p>Methodius continued mission work for 16 more years. He was papal legate for all the Slavic peoples, consecrated a bishop and then given an ancient see (now in the Czech Republic). When much of their former territory was removed from their jurisdiction, the Bavarian bishops retaliated with a violent storm of accusation against Methodius. As a result, Emperor Louis the German exiled Methodius for three years. Pope John VIII secured his release. </p><p>Because the Frankish clergy, still smarting, continued their accusations, Methodius had to go to Rome to defend himself against charges of heresy and uphold his use of the Slavonic liturgy. He was again vindicated. </p><p>Legend has it that in a feverish period of activity, Methodius translated the whole Bible into Slavonic in eight months. He died on Tuesday of Holy Week, surrounded by his disciples, in his cathedral church. </p><p>Opposition continued after his death, and the work of the brothers in Moravia was brought to an end and their disciples scattered. But the expulsions had the beneficial effect of spreading the spiritual, liturgical and cultural work of the brothers to Bulgaria, Bohemia and southern Poland. Patrons of Moravia, and specially venerated by Catholic Czechs, Slovaks, Croatians, Orthodox Serbians and Bulgarians, Cyril and Methodius are eminently fitted to guard the long-desired unity of East and West. In 1980, Pope John Paul II named them additional co-patrons of Europe (with Benedict).</p> American Catholic Blog This is the beauty of self-giving love: Men and women, driven by love, freely choose to give up their autonomy, to limit their freedom, by committing themselves to the good of the spouse. Love is so powerful that it impels them to want to surrender their will to their beloved in this profound way.

New Call-to-action

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
St. Valentine
Catholic Greetings helps you remind others that God is the source of all human love.

First Sunday in Lent
Assure your parish’s newly Elect of your prayers as they journey toward Easter.

St. Valentine's Day
Bring candy and flowers but send an e-card.

Our Lady of Lourdes
Celebrate our Blessed Mother who never tires of interceding on our behalf.

Ash Wednesday
Throughout these 40 days we allow our pride to fade into humility as together we ask for forgiveness.




Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2016