AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

The Change-Up

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service

"The Change-Up" (Universal) constitutes a raunchy comic riff on the age-old switched-identities premise, a fetid "Freaky Friday" calculated to please only those sophomoric moviegoers who thrill at having their sensibilities assaulted by what they see on screen.

That onslaught begins betimes as we're introduced to the home life of diligent but beleaguered husband and dad Dave Lockwood (Jason Bateman). Dave's sleepy middle-of-the-night effort to get his baby's diaper changed turns into the kind of revolting misadventure that might keep a somewhat backward fourth grader in stitches.

And speaking of underachieving grade schoolers, enter Dave's foil, and best friends since childhood, Mitch Planko (Ryan Reynolds). A commitment-phobic ne'er-do-well, Mitch drifts his days away with nary a care, but nonetheless envies Dave's role as a family man. And Dave, of course, reciprocates by yearning for the freedom Mitch enjoys.

When, after a night out on the town together, the two pals simultaneously give vent to their mutual jealousy while using a local fountain as a urinal—a characteristic touch—we're on to the fact, if they aren't, that tomorrow they'll wake up inhabiting each other's bodies.

For Dave that means keeping Mitch's appointment on the set of a "lorn," i.e., "light porn" movie, where he cavorts with fellow cast members of both sexes. For Mitch it involves failing spectacularly to fit in at Dave's button-down law firm, then returning home to find his long-standing ardor for Dave's wife, Jamie (Leslie Mann), suddenly cooled by her noisy, open-door use of their en suite bathroom.

And so it goes. Mitch, it emerges, has an aberrant taste for expectant mothers, a jones he indulges by trolling for talent at Lamaze classes. Dave's more orthodox appetites have him using his new persona to chase fetching law office associate Sabrina (Olivia Wilde) after whom he has long lusted.

With exquisite casuistry, Dave reasons that sleeping with Sabrina won't count as cheating on Jamie as long as he uses Mitch's body to do it.

By the time we get to an extended, late-reel joke wherein Mitch, as Dave, compares the closing of an important business deal to the successful seduction of a Catholic schoolgirl, the wearied viewer is almost too numb to be offended. Almost.

As helmed by David Dobkin, this puerile mess amounts to little more than yet another tiresome attempt to expand the boundaries of bad taste.

The film contains graphic nonmarital sexual activity, masturbation, upper female and rear nudity, drug use, repulsive scatological humor, several uses of profanity, and pervasive rough and crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is O—morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R—restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

*****
John Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.



Search reviews at CatholicMovieReviews.org


Thank you for your comments. Editors will review all posts before they are visible on the website.

blog comments powered by Disqus







Daniel Brottier: Daniel spent most of his life in the trenches—one way or another. 
<p>Born in France in 1876, Daniel was ordained in 1899 and began a teaching career. That didn’t satisfy him long. He wanted to use his zeal for the gospel far beyond the classroom. He joined the missionary Congregation of the Holy Spirit, which sent him to Senegal, West Africa. After eight years there, his health was suffering. He was forced to return to France, where he helped raise funds for the construction of a new cathedral in Senegal. </p><p>At the outbreak of World War I Daniel became a volunteer chaplain and spent four years at the front. He did not shrink from his duties. Indeed, he risked his life time and again in ministering to the suffering and dying. It was miraculous that he did not suffer a single wound during his 52 months in the heart of battle. </p><p>After the war he was invited to help establish a project for orphaned and abandoned children in a Paris suburb. He spent the final 13 years of his life there. He died in 1936 and was beatified by Pope John Paul II in Paris only 48 years later.</p> American Catholic Blog The simplest thing to do is to receive and accept that fact of our humanity gratefully and gracefully. We make mistakes. We forget. We get tired. But it is the Spirit who is leading us through this desert and the Spirit who remains with us there.


 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Second Sunday in Lent
Lent invites us to open our hearts, minds and bodies to the grace of rebirth.

Thank You
Catholic Greetings offers an assortment of blank e-cards for various occasions.

Caregiver
The caregiver’s hands are the hands of Christ still at work in the world.

Lent
During Lent the whole Christian community follows Christ’s example of penance.

Happy Birthday
Take advantage of our selection of free and premium birthday e-cards, with and without verses.




Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2015