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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Snow Flower and the Secret Fan

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

This is a beautiful motion picture about Chinese women from director Wayne Wang who also brought us “The Joy Luck Club” in 1993.  Whereas “The Joy Luck Club” was based on the best-selling novel by Amy Tan about mother-daughter relationships and the tensions between Chinese and American culture, “Snow Flower and the Secret Fan”, also based on a best-selling novel by Lisa See, is about life-long friendship between women contrasted with early 19th century Chinese culture and contemporary Chinese culture in Hong Kong and Singapore.

Students of culture know that it is created by the bonds of communication and sustained by the values emphasized in that communication. While being female in China is still not valued as are males, even under a Communist government that preaches equality, two hundred years ago, women could have the final word if they had a girl friend, a soul mate. This tradition is called “laotung” and often girl friends were brought together by a kind of matchmaker, transcending even social class, in a commitment that was seldom broken.

This friendship was nourished by communication via a secret language, Nüshu, written on fans.  According to anthropologists, this is the only language in the history of the world to be developed by and for women.

Snow Flower and Lily’s friendship survived war, misunderstanding, and an unhappy, isolated marriage for one, and a poor, rough, though loving marriage by the other. It was broken once, but in death, healed and made beautiful again.
 
Nina and Sophia are also friends from childhood, where Nina teaches Sophia, who is from Korea, how to speak Mandarin.  They remain close even through the challenges best them from differences in social class, family, and education.
 
This is a film about tradition, the emotional connections created through life-long friendships, loyalty, sacrifices, and sisterly love. I think the theme of language and communication frames the story and creates layers of meaning that cinephiles will enjoy discussing.

Nina /Lily are played by Bingbing Li and  Snow Flower/Sophia are played by Gianna Jun.


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Antonio Lucci: Antonio studied with and was a friend of St. Francesco Antonio Fasani, who after Antonio Lucci’s death testified at the diocesan hearings regarding the holiness of Lucci. 
<p>Born in Agnone in southern Italy, a city famous for manufacturing bells and copper crafts, he was given the name Angelo at Baptism. He attended the local school run by the Conventual Franciscans and joined them at the age of 16. Antonio completed his studies for the priesthood in Assisi, where he was ordained in 1705. Further studies led to a doctorate in theology and appointments as a teacher in Agnone, Ravello and Naples. He also served as guardian in Naples. </p><p>Elected minister provincial in 1718, the following year he was appointed professor at St. Bonaventure College in Rome, a position he held until Pope Benedict XIII chose him as bishop of Bovino (near Foggia) in 1729. The pope explained, "I have chosen as bishop of Bovino an eminent theologian and a great saint." </p><p>His 23 years as bishop were marked by visits to local parishes and a renewal of gospel living among the people of his diocese. He dedicated his episcopal income to works of education and charity. At the urging of the Conventual minister general, Bishop Lucci wrote a major book about the saints and blesseds in the first 200 years of the Conventual Franciscans. </p><p>He was beatified in 1989, three years after his friend Francesco Antonio Fasani was canonized.</p> American Catholic Blog Father, we are all sinners. I am a sinner. I beg for the grace to never judge the actions of others, since it is possible that I might do the same things if I were in their situation. I ask this in Jesus's name, Amen.

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