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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Horrible Bosses

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

Nick (Jason Bateman) says that his grandmother came to this country with $20.00 in her pocket and she refused to take guff  (he used another word) from anyone. She died with $2,000.00 because she refused to take any guff from anyone. Nick had been working for a company president, a suspected psychopath Dave Harken (Kevin Spacey) for eight years and he took guff so he could get promoted to the vice president of the company. Dave lead him on and on and then at a corporate meeting announced that he was appointing himself vice president, too, and publically humiliates Nick  at the same time.
 
Kurt (Jason Sudeikis) is an accountant and the heir apparent to take over as the president of the company rather than the owner Jack’s (Donald Sutherland) crack-addicted, mean and shiftless son, Bobby (Colin Farrell). But Jack has a heart attack and dies before the paperwork is done and Bobby threatens to fire Kurt if he doesn’t fire overweight people and the handicapped.
 
Charlie is a dental technician who just became engaged. He is a registered sex offender but as he explains continually throughout the film, he was relieving himself outside a bar in a school playground at midnight; no one was there. He works for the sex-addled Dr. Julia Harris (Jennifer Anniston) who tries to blackmail him into having sex and betraying his fiancé.
 
The three friends decide to get rid of their bosses and think they are hiring a bona fide hit man, Jones (Jamie Foxx), who had done ten years in prison and pay him $5,000.00. Then he tells them he is now a consultant and they have to do the deed themselves.
 
This is a crude, gross movie with so much bad language and behavior that an airplane version would probably only last five minutes. Unfortunately it is very funny, especially the way the Jamie Foxx character, Jones, (I am unable to use his full name here) consults by way of referring to what characters do in motion pictures old and more current.
 
This is a bit of a spoiler but the funniest moment to me was toward the end when Jones tells these three stooges (downgraded for the 21st century) that he never murdered anyone. They ask him what he had gone to prison for. “Did you see that movie ‘Snow Falling on Cedars’?” A couple of the guys nod. “Yeah, the cops caught me taping it in the theater and got me on video piracy.” The men cannot believe that Jones went to prison “for pirating an Ethan Hawke movie!”
 
“Horrible Bosses” is not as horrible as some of the puerile movies made for a male audience, but almost.   If there is anything worthwhile to take away from this crudely indulgent film by four accomplished television comedians (I am including Jennifer Anniston here), is that bullying goes on in the workplace and the abuse of power, while often absurd and incomprehensible, can cause real suffering. Bullying always has consequences.
 
Though we already knew this going in, taking the criminal route to solve your problems is not a good idea, either.
 
It took four people to come up with this story and write it.  With few exceptions, more than two credited writers on any production is almost always a sign that the movie is not worth anyone’s time.
 
Voila’.
 




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Augustine of Canterbury: In the year 596, some 40 monks set out from Rome to evangelize the Anglo-Saxons in England. Leading the group was Augustine, the prior of their monastery in Rome. Hardly had he and his men reached Gaul (France) when they heard stories of the ferocity of the Anglo-Saxons and of the treacherous waters of the English Channel. Augustine returned to Rome and to the pope who had sent them—St. Gregory the Great (September 3 )—only to be assured by him that their fears were groundless. 
<p>Augustine again set out. This time the group crossed the English Channel and landed in the territory of Kent, ruled by King Ethelbert, a pagan married to a Christian, Bertha. Ethelbert received them kindly, set up a residence for them in Canterbury and within the year, on Pentecost Sunday, 597, was himself baptized. After being consecrated a bishop in France, Augustine returned to Canterbury, where he founded his see. He constructed a church and monastery near where the present cathedral, begun in 1070, now stands. As the faith spread, additional sees were established at London and Rochester. </p><p>Work was sometimes slow and Augustine did not always meet with success. Attempts to reconcile the Anglo-Saxon Christians with the original Briton Christians (who had been driven into western England by Anglo-Saxon invaders) ended in dismal failure. Augustine failed to convince the Britons to give up certain Celtic customs at variance with Rome and to forget their bitterness, helping him evangelize their Anglo-Saxon conquerors </p><p>Laboring patiently, Augustine wisely heeded the missionary principles—quite enlightened for the times—suggested by Pope Gregory the Great: purify rather than destroy pagan temples and customs; let pagan rites and festivals be transformed into Christian feasts; retain local customs as far as possible. The limited success Augustine achieved in England before his death in 605, a short eight years after he arrived in England, would eventually bear fruit long after in the conversion of England. Augustine of Canterbury can truly be called the “Apostle of England.”</p> American Catholic Blog A hero isn’t someone born with unconquerable strength and selflessness. Heroes are not formed in a cataclysmic instant. Heroism is developed over time, one decision after another, moment by moment, formed by a deliberate, chosen, and habitual response to life.

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