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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Horrible Bosses

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

Nick (Jason Bateman) says that his grandmother came to this country with $20.00 in her pocket and she refused to take guff  (he used another word) from anyone. She died with $2,000.00 because she refused to take any guff from anyone. Nick had been working for a company president, a suspected psychopath Dave Harken (Kevin Spacey) for eight years and he took guff so he could get promoted to the vice president of the company. Dave lead him on and on and then at a corporate meeting announced that he was appointing himself vice president, too, and publically humiliates Nick  at the same time.
 
Kurt (Jason Sudeikis) is an accountant and the heir apparent to take over as the president of the company rather than the owner Jack’s (Donald Sutherland) crack-addicted, mean and shiftless son, Bobby (Colin Farrell). But Jack has a heart attack and dies before the paperwork is done and Bobby threatens to fire Kurt if he doesn’t fire overweight people and the handicapped.
 
Charlie is a dental technician who just became engaged. He is a registered sex offender but as he explains continually throughout the film, he was relieving himself outside a bar in a school playground at midnight; no one was there. He works for the sex-addled Dr. Julia Harris (Jennifer Anniston) who tries to blackmail him into having sex and betraying his fiancé.
 
The three friends decide to get rid of their bosses and think they are hiring a bona fide hit man, Jones (Jamie Foxx), who had done ten years in prison and pay him $5,000.00. Then he tells them he is now a consultant and they have to do the deed themselves.
 
This is a crude, gross movie with so much bad language and behavior that an airplane version would probably only last five minutes. Unfortunately it is very funny, especially the way the Jamie Foxx character, Jones, (I am unable to use his full name here) consults by way of referring to what characters do in motion pictures old and more current.
 
This is a bit of a spoiler but the funniest moment to me was toward the end when Jones tells these three stooges (downgraded for the 21st century) that he never murdered anyone. They ask him what he had gone to prison for. “Did you see that movie ‘Snow Falling on Cedars’?” A couple of the guys nod. “Yeah, the cops caught me taping it in the theater and got me on video piracy.” The men cannot believe that Jones went to prison “for pirating an Ethan Hawke movie!”
 
“Horrible Bosses” is not as horrible as some of the puerile movies made for a male audience, but almost.   If there is anything worthwhile to take away from this crudely indulgent film by four accomplished television comedians (I am including Jennifer Anniston here), is that bullying goes on in the workplace and the abuse of power, while often absurd and incomprehensible, can cause real suffering. Bullying always has consequences.
 
Though we already knew this going in, taking the criminal route to solve your problems is not a good idea, either.
 
It took four people to come up with this story and write it.  With few exceptions, more than two credited writers on any production is almost always a sign that the movie is not worth anyone’s time.
 
Voila’.
 


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John Joseph of the Cross: Self-denial is never an end in itself but is only a help toward greater charity—as the life of St. John Joseph shows. 
<p>John Joseph was very ascetic even as a young man. At 16 he joined the Franciscans in Naples; he was the first Italian to follow the reform movement of St. Peter Alcantara. John Joseph’s reputation for holiness prompted his superiors to put him in charge of establishing a new friary even before he was ordained. </p><p>Obedience moved John Joseph to accept appointments as novice master, guardian and, finally, provincial. His years of mortification enabled him to offer these services to the friars with great charity. As guardian he was not above working in the kitchen or carrying the wood and water needed by the friars. </p><p>When his term as provincial expired, John Joseph dedicated himself to hearing confessions and practicing mortification, two concerns contrary to the spirit of the dawning Age of Enlightenment. John Joseph was canonized in 1839.</p> American Catholic Blog Humility is possible only for the free. Those who are secure in the Father’s love, have no need of pomp and circumstance or people fawning on them. They know who they are, where they’ve come from, and where they are going. Not taking themselves too seriously, they can laugh at themselves. The proud cannot.


 
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