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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Zookeeper

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service


Kevin James stars in the movie "Zookeeper."
We have it on the authority of Simon and Garfunkel that "it's all happening at the zoo." Unfortunately, not much of any consequence—or entertainment value—transpires within the confines of the scattershot, sometimes earthy comedy "Zookeeper" (Columbia/MGM).

In fact, neither director Frank Coraci nor anybody else involved in this ill-matched crossbreeding of romance and fantasy seems certain whether it's intended to be fish or fowl, and so it succeeds in being neither. Too mushy—and occasionally too mature—for kids, this Kevin James vehicle is too sloppy to satisfy their discerning elders.

James, who also co-wrote the script, plays Griffin Keyes, a likable schlub whose enthusiasm for his work as an attendant at Boston's Franklin Park Zoo helps blunt the pain of his empty personal life.

As we learn from the opening scene, five years ago, Griffin suffered a terrible humiliation when Stephanie (Leslie Bibb), his girlfriend, broke up with him just as he was down on one knee proposing to her.

Flash forward to the present where, for no very apparent reason, a family wedding brings Stephanie back into the mix. Still smitten, Griffin wonders aloud if he should quit his job to win Stephanie back.

The mere mention of such a possibility sends Griffin's four-legged, furred and feathered friends into a panic as a result of which we discover—as Griffin himself does soon after—that they speak fluent human.

The first few minutes of their dialogue are amusing enough, since the personalities they now display range from a soul-sister giraffe (voice of Maya Rudolph) to a comically kibitzing yiddisher monkey (voice of Adam Sandler).

We're also eventually introduced to a temporarily depressed but fun-loving gorilla (voice of Nick Nolte) who becomes Griffin's boon companion on a kick-over-the-traces evening at—and extended commercial for—T.G.I. Friday's.

As Griffin becomes the recipient of "Wild Kingdom"-style mating advice from the animals, things take a less-than-family-friendly turn. Under the tutelage of the zoo's resident wolf, for instance, Griffin tries to "mark his territory," but is suddenly interrupted by his colleague Kate (Rosario Dawson) who—amid his frantic fumbling—gets an unwanted eyeful.

At another point, a duo of bears urges Griffin to walk in such a way as to draw attention to what they refer to as his "pudding cup."

Meanwhile we wait for Griffin to catch on to the fact, long since surmised by viewers, that the gal he ought to be pursuing is not materialistic Stephanie (with whom, however, we see that he has not only reconciled but also shacked up). Rather, of course, it's caring, animal-loving, bright-as-a-button Kate.

Despite the elements listed below, "Zookeeper," while not suitable for children, is probably acceptable for mature teens.

The film contains cohabitation, brief implied frontal nudity, some scatological and restrained sexual humor and a couple of mildly crass terms. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III—adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG—parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.

*****
John Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.



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Th&eacute;r&egrave;se of Lisieux: "I prefer the monotony of obscure sacrifice to all ecstasies. To pick up a pin for love can convert a soul." These are the words of Thérèse of the Child Jesus, a Carmelite nun called the "Little Flower," who lived a cloistered life of obscurity in the convent of Lisieux, France. (In French-speaking areas, she is known as Thérèse of Lisieux.) And her preference for hidden sacrifice did indeed convert souls. Few saints of God are more popular than this young nun. Her autobiography, <i>The Story of a Soul</i>, is read and loved throughout the world. Thérèse Martin entered the convent at the age of 15 and died in 1897 at the age of 24. She was canonized in 1925, and two years later she and St. Francis Xavier were declared co-patrons of the missions. 
<p>Life in a Carmelite convent is indeed uneventful and consists mainly of prayer and hard domestic work. But Thérèse possessed that holy insight that redeems the time, however dull that time may be. She saw in quiet suffering redemptive suffering, suffering that was indeed her apostolate. Thérèse said she came to the Carmel convent "to save souls and pray for priests." And shortly before she died, she wrote: "I want to spend my heaven doing good on earth." </p><p>On October 19, 1997, Saint John Paul II proclaimed her a Doctor of the Church, the third woman to be so recognized, in light of her holiness and the influence on the Church of her teaching on spirituality. Her parents, Louis and Zélie were beatified in 2008.</p> American Catholic Blog How glorious, how holy and wonderful it is to have a Father in Heaven.

 
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