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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Mr. Popper's Penguins

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

Imagine if you were an only child and your father was seldom at home because he was wandering the earth looking for adventure. He would call or write, but eventually as you grew up, you almost forgot him.

This is the case of Mr. Popper (Jim Carrey). He is a hotshot Manhattan real estate broker with an assistant Pippi (Ophelia Lovibond) speaks with words that mostly begin with the letter “p”.  Mr. Popper and his wife Amanda (Carla Giugno) are divorced.  Their two children love their dad, but “Popper” as they all call him, is not very good at family life.

One day a crate is delivered to Mr. Popper’s condo and inside is a Gentoo penguin. Through a misunderstanding, five more arrive in the next crate. Popper doesn’t have permission to have pets and penguins are not meant to be in a New York condo, so a series of misadventures ensue that are pretty funny.

The film is based on the 1938 children’s classic by Richard and Florence Atwater. I have not read the book, but others who have say this film version is just not the same. Certainly it has been updated to reflect the social mores of today. Also, the film correctly places these penguins in Antarctica rather than the North Pole – there is no evidence that any penguins have colonized north of the equator.

Besides the film’s silly physical comedy, Angela Lansbury plays the owner of the Tavern on the Green in Central Park. Popper is supposed to convince her to sell it, but she will only sell to a person of character. Popper has a lot of growing up to do to meet her standards.

I often wonder if it is right to capture animals for zoos or to use wild animals in films and circuses for our entertainment. The American Humane Society http://americanhumaneblog.org/2011/06/the-real-star-of-mr-poppers-penguins-jim-carrey-or-the-gentoo/ gave “Mr. poppers Penguins” a “There were no animals harmed” rating of  “outstanding”.

The Catechism of the Catholic Church offers this as guidance: “It is contrary to human dignity to cause animals to suffer or die needlessly. It is likewise unworthy to spend money on them that should as a priority go to the relief of human misery. One can love animals; one should not direct to them the affection due only to persons.” (CCC #2418)

Actually, the Poppers get it right. But filmmakers and others who remove animals from their natural habitats for our entertainment, have some explaining to do.


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Our Lady of Lourdes: On December 8, 1854, Pope Pius IX proclaimed the dogma of the Immaculate Conception in the apostolic constitution <i>Ineffabilis Deus</i>. A little more than three years later, on February 11, 1858, a young lady appeared to Bernadette Soubirous. This began a series of visions. During the apparition on March 25, the lady identified herself with the words: “I am the Immaculate Conception.” 
<p>Bernadette was a sickly child of poor parents. Their practice of the Catholic faith was scarcely more than lukewarm. Bernadette could pray the Our Father, the Hail Mary and the Creed. She also knew the prayer of the Miraculous Medal: “O Mary conceived without sin.” </p><p>During interrogations Bernadette gave an account of what she saw. It was “something white in the shape of a girl.” She used the word <i>aquero</i>, a dialect term meaning “this thing.” It was “a pretty young girl with a rosary over her arm.” Her white robe was encircled by a blue girdle. She wore a white veil. There was a yellow rose on each foot. A rosary was in her hand. Bernadette was also impressed by the fact that the lady did not use the informal form of address (<i>tu</i>), but the polite form (<i>vous</i>). The humble virgin appeared to a humble girl and treated her with dignity. </p><p>Through that humble girl, Mary revitalized and continues to revitalize the faith of millions of people. People began to flock to Lourdes from other parts of France and from all over the world. In 1862 Church authorities confirmed the authenticity of the apparitions and authorized the cult of Our Lady of Lourdes for the diocese. The Feast of Our Lady of Lourdes became worldwide in 1907.</p> American Catholic Blog While the term social justice has received negative connotations in some circles in recent years due to certain media misrepresentations of the tradition, the vocation of all Christian women and men to work toward the common good, protect the dignity of all human life, strive toward ending violence in all forms, and providing for the welfare of all people remains integral to who we are as bearers of the name Christ.

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