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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

A Better Life

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

Carlos (Demián Bichir) works as a gardener in East Los Angeles. His boss, Blasco (Joaquin Cosio) is an undocumented worker like himself, but who has saved enough money to return to Mexico. He convinces Carlos to borrow money to buy the truck  and his client list. Carlos turns to his sister (Dolores Heredia), who has legal status because of her marriage, and she gives him money she has saved for a rainy day.

Carlos is raising his teenaged son Luis (Jose Julian) alone. Luis was born in the U.S. but his mother left the family early on. Carlos sleeps on the couch so his son can have his own room, like a normal kid. Jose is surly and unappreciative toward his father and is trying to join a gang.

Carlos seems fulfilled as he drives his truck past the crowd of day workers hoping to be hired. He chooses a man who had once shared his lunch with Carlos as they both waited for someone to hire them. Then disaster strikes. Director Chris Weitz (“About a Boy”), with a nod to the Vittorio de Sica 1948 film “Bicycle Thieves”,  notches up the anxiety level when the man steals Carlos’ truck. Without his truck, Carlos will lose everything he has gained to make a better life for his son.

The rest of the film shows Carlos and Jose searching for the truck demonstrating smart detective skills with few resources, Jose flirting with gang membership and loyalty to his father, and evading the immigration authorities.

“A Better Life” asks the audience to consider what it is like to come from a place of little or opportunity to make a better life. The issue of undocumented workers, or as they are often referred to as “illegal immigrants” or “Illegal aliens”, is a touchy one in the United States today. Yet, the situation of undocumented workers, or those whose parents are undocumented but whose children were born in the U.S., who contribute much to our country by doing work no one else will do, as well as building up church participation, is precisely where Christian discipleship and authentic citizenship intersect; they are compatible – not mutually exclusive.  As followers of Jesus we can help create a way forward that is just for all.
“A Better Life” is a touching film, and some may think it is heavy on message. The acting is good, and held my interest from the very beginning. Some may take issue with the ending, however, people are resilient, and the bonds of family very strong.


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Pierre Toussaint: 
		<p>Born in modern-day Haiti and brought to New York City as a slave, Pierre died a free man, a renowned hairdresser and one of New York City’s most well-known Catholics. <br /><br />Pierre Bérard, a plantation owner, made Toussaint a house slave and allowed his grandmother to teach her grandson how to read and write. In his early 20s, Pierre, his younger sister, his aunt and two other house slaves accompanied their master’s son to New York City because of political unrest at home. Apprenticed to a local hairdresser, Pierre learned the trade quickly and eventually worked very successfully in the homes of rich women in New York City. <br /><br />When his master died, Pierre was determined to support his master’s widow, himself and the other house slaves. He was freed shortly before the widow’s death in 1807. </p>
		<p>Four years later he married Marie Rose Juliette, whose freedom he had purchased. They later adopted Euphémie, his orphaned niece. Both preceded him in death. He attended daily Mass at St. Peter’s Church on Barclay Street, the same parish that St. Elizabeth Seton attended. <br /><br />Pierre donated to various charities, generously assisting blacks and whites in need. He and his wife opened their home to orphans and educated them. The couple also nursed abandoned people who were suffering from yellow fever. Urged to retire and enjoy the wealth he had accumulated, Pierre responded, “I have enough for myself, but if I stop working I have not enough for others.” <br /><br />He was originally buried outside St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral, where he was once refused entrance because of his race. His sanctity and the popular devotion to him caused his body to be moved to St. Patrick’s Cathedral on Fifth Avenue. <br /><br />Pierre Toussaint was declared Venerable in 1996.</p>
American Catholic Blog It’s through suffering that we grow in endurance, character, and ultimately, in hope. Our suffering is not without value if we know Jesus. When you are suffering, you can pray and unite your sufferings to the only one who truly loves you perfectly or knows all you are feeling.

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CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Ven. Pierre Toussaint
This former slave is one of many American holy people whose life particularly models Christian values.

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Rejoice with a friend who is transitioning from the highs and lows of daily employment.

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Memorial Day (U.S.)
Remember today all those who have fought and died for peace.

Pentecost
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