AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Green Lantern

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service


Ryan Reynolds stars in a scene from the movie "Green Lantern."
It's an unsettling sign when a contemporary film might aptly be subtitled "Triumph of the Will" -- the moniker, of course, of Leni Riefenstahl's 1935 pro-Nazi "documentary" and a phrase that highlights the Hitler movement's debt to the atheistic, nihilist philosophy of Friederich Nietzsche (1844-1900).

But such, surprisingly enough, is the case with the mediocre comic-book adaptation "Green Lantern" (Warner Bros.), an adventure whose underlying mythos pits will against fear, glorifying the former and claiming for it powers that are at best unrealistic and at worst unintentionally blasphemous.

Granted, director Martin Campbell's screen version of a set of tales that date back to 1940 is a sci-fi fantasy, and one within which the will is consistently directed and trained to good ends. Adult viewers, accordingly, will likely have little difficulty either sorting through the values on offer or dismissing the muddled metaphysics out of hand.

Responsible parents of faith, nonetheless, will be reluctant to have their targeted teens exposed to a set of ideas—e.g., "Will turns thought into reality," meaning, in this case, physical reality—that seem tainted by a range of crackpot ideologies.

The man eventually achieving whatever his mind is conceiving is devil-may-care test pilot Hal Jordan (Ryan Reynolds). Through a set of circumstances—and a wad of exposition—best left on screen, Jordan suddenly finds himself endowed with superhuman powers and enlisted, somewhat against his will, in the ranks of an elite force of intergalactic warriors.

Presenting the yang to Hal's yin is brooding biology professor Dr. Hector Hammond (Peter Sarsgaard).

When Hammond is accidentally infected with super-villain negative energy—via another chain of events over which we needn't tarry—it offers him the chance to act on his long-standing jealousy of Hal's on-again, off-again relationship with aeronautics executive Carol Ferris (Blake Lively) whom both men have known—and, presumably, loved—since childhood.

The effects-driven proceedings that follow do see Hal struggling to become more responsible—in the bedroom as well as on the cosmic beat. (We know his behavior within the first forum is in need of rehabilitation since the opening scene shows him parting company with an acquaintance of recent vintage after what was clearly a one-night stand.)

But scenes in which Hal creates physical objects by willing them into existence—a form of creativity reserved to God alone—as well as a script that presents the will, properly channeled, as the strongest force in the universe suggest a worldview not easily squared with the teachings of Scripture. Well-grounded grown-ups may want to hunt for that congruence; youngsters should not undertake the search.

The film contains themes requiring mature discernment, much bloodless violence, implied casual sex, a few uses of profanity as well as some crude language and sexual references. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III—adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13—parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

*****
John Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.



Search reviews at CatholicMovieReviews.org


Thank you for your comments. Editors will review all posts before they are visible on the website.

blog comments powered by Disqus







Wolfgang of Regensburg: Wolfgang was born in Swabia, Germany, and was educated at a school located at the abbey of Reichenau. There he encountered Henry, a young noble who went on to become Archbishop of Trier. Meanwhile, Wolfgang remained in close contact with the archbishop, teaching in his cathedral school and supporting his efforts to reform the clergy. 
<p>At the death of the archbishop, Wolfgang chose to become a Benedictine monk and moved to an abbey in Einsiedeln, now part of Switzerland. Ordained a priest, he was appointed director of the monastery school there. Later he was sent to Hungary as a missionary, though his zeal and good will yielded limited results. </p><p>Emperor Otto II appointed him Bishop of Regensburg near Munich. He immediately initiated reform of the clergy and of religious life, preaching with vigor and effectiveness and always demonstrating special concern for the poor. He wore the habit of a monk and lived an austere life. </p><p>The draw to monastic life never left him, including the desire for a life of solitude. At one point he left his diocese so that he could devote himself to prayer, but his responsibilities as bishop called him back. </p><p>In 994 Wolfgang became ill while on a journey; he died in Puppingen near Linz, Austria. He was canonized in 1052. His feast day is celebrated widely in much of central Europe. </p> American Catholic Blog Keep your gaze always on our most beloved Jesus, asking him in the depths of his heart what he desires for you, and never deny him anything even if it means going strongly against the grain for you. –Blessed Maria Sagrario of St. Aloysius Gonzaga

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
Peace and Good
"A practical and appealing guide to the Poor Man of Assisi." —Margaret Carney, O.S.F., president, St. Bonaventure University
New from Jon Sweeney!
What changed to make a rebellious, reveling young man become the most popular saint in history?
New from Servant!
"Valuable and inspiring wisdom for everyone." —Ralph Martin, S.T.D., author, The Legacy of the New Evangelization
Thomas Merton
"Padovano's presentation of Thomas Merton is second to none." —Paul M. Pearson, director, Thomas Merton Center
When the Church Was Young
Be inspired and challenged by the lives and insights of the Church's early, important teachers.

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
All Hallows' Eve
Christians can celebrate Halloween because we believe that good will always triumph over evil.
Congratulations
Share the joy of a special occasion by sending a Catholic Greetings e-card!
Halloween
Welcome Friday evening's goblins with treats and blessings!
St. Jude
Countless generations of Catholics have brought their prayers and their tears to this patron of hopeless causes.
Happy Birthday
You are one of a kind. There has never been another you.



Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2014