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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Bridesmaids

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

Annie (Kristen Wiig) is a down-on-her-luck friend and maid of honor to Lillian (Maya Rudolph). Annie also has relationship issues and the man (Jon Hamm) she is sleeping with has no intention of making a commitment.

Problems start when Helen (Rose Byrne) becomes part of the bridal party. She is wealthy, unhappy, and lonely – and will become Lillian’s new sister-in-law. Annie is jealous of Helen’s ability to provide every good thing to make the wedding perfect and throws a hilarious fit. They reconcile and Annie shares memories of growing up as best friends with Lillian.  Helen uses this information to garner Lillian’s favor and events collude to almost bring down the wedding.

Some will think this is a vulgar movie, and some parts of it are. I hesitated before seeing it because it seemed as if were the girls’ answer to “The Hangover” and “The Hangover II” phenomenon of raunch.

Note that Judd Apatow is one of the producers for “Bridesmaids”; he gave us “The Forty Year-Old Virgin” and “Knocked Up”. He uses a “bait and switch” technique to get the attention of male viewers – he creates the grungiest sex and body parts and functions scenarios only to have the main characters realize how superficial their lives are and that relationships, marriage, and family matter.

Director Paul Feig does the same thing in “Bridesmaids”. Some of the scenes were unnecessary and will offend sensibilities, as will the language, but at its core, the film has so much heart and sweetness. The main characters do grow and change for the better, and it’s really funny. Thank God the girls never made it to Vegas (the airlines put them off at Casper International Airport in Wyoming. I went there once to give some presentations and there are antelope grazing beside the tiny terminal; very funny moment.)

So this review is not a recommendation, but there are probably young women in your life that will see it. The question is: what will they learn? I would hope their take away is that casual sex is demeaning and disappointing and that friendships are fragile but they can last forever if we tend to them.


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<p>James was born in the Marche of Ancona, in central Italy along the Adriatic Sea. After earning doctorates in canon and civil law at the University of Perugia, he joined the Friars Minor and began a very austere life. He fasted nine months of the year; he slept three hours a night. St. Bernardine of Siena told him to moderate his penances. </p><p>James studied theology with St. John of Capistrano. Ordained in 1420, James began a preaching career that took him all over Italy and through 13 Central and Eastern European countries. This extremely popular preacher converted many people (250,000 at one estimate) and helped spread devotion to the Holy Name of Jesus. His sermons prompted numerous Catholics to reform their lives and many men joined the Franciscans under his influence. </p><p>With John of Capistrano, Albert of Sarteano and Bernardine of Siena, James is considered one of the "four pillars" of the Observant movement among the Franciscans. These friars became known especially for their preaching. </p><p>To combat extremely high interest rates, James established <i>montes pietatis</i> (literally, mountains of charity)--nonprofit credit organizations that lent money at very low rates on pawned objects. </p><p>Not everyone was happy with the work James did. Twice assassins lost their nerve when they came face to face with him. James died in 1476 and was canonized in 1726.</p> American Catholic Blog We all have fears, but we don’t have to be afraid. Jesus is always with us to protect us and give us courage. We only have to remember that the battle is the Lord’s. When Jesus gives us the victory, let’s be sure to thank Him and praise Him for what He has done.

 
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