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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Bridesmaids

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

Annie (Kristen Wiig) is a down-on-her-luck friend and maid of honor to Lillian (Maya Rudolph). Annie also has relationship issues and the man (Jon Hamm) she is sleeping with has no intention of making a commitment.

Problems start when Helen (Rose Byrne) becomes part of the bridal party. She is wealthy, unhappy, and lonely – and will become Lillian’s new sister-in-law. Annie is jealous of Helen’s ability to provide every good thing to make the wedding perfect and throws a hilarious fit. They reconcile and Annie shares memories of growing up as best friends with Lillian.  Helen uses this information to garner Lillian’s favor and events collude to almost bring down the wedding.

Some will think this is a vulgar movie, and some parts of it are. I hesitated before seeing it because it seemed as if were the girls’ answer to “The Hangover” and “The Hangover II” phenomenon of raunch.

Note that Judd Apatow is one of the producers for “Bridesmaids”; he gave us “The Forty Year-Old Virgin” and “Knocked Up”. He uses a “bait and switch” technique to get the attention of male viewers – he creates the grungiest sex and body parts and functions scenarios only to have the main characters realize how superficial their lives are and that relationships, marriage, and family matter.

Director Paul Feig does the same thing in “Bridesmaids”. Some of the scenes were unnecessary and will offend sensibilities, as will the language, but at its core, the film has so much heart and sweetness. The main characters do grow and change for the better, and it’s really funny. Thank God the girls never made it to Vegas (the airlines put them off at Casper International Airport in Wyoming. I went there once to give some presentations and there are antelope grazing beside the tiny terminal; very funny moment.)

So this review is not a recommendation, but there are probably young women in your life that will see it. The question is: what will they learn? I would hope their take away is that casual sex is demeaning and disappointing and that friendships are fragile but they can last forever if we tend to them.


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Paul Miki and Companions: Nagasaki, Japan, is familiar to Americans as the city on which the second atomic bomb was dropped, immediately killing over 37,000 people. Three and a half centuries before, 26 martyrs of Japan were crucified on a hill, now known as the Holy Mountain, overlooking Nagasaki. Among them were priests, brothers and laymen, Franciscans, Jesuits and members of the Secular Franciscan Order; there were catechists, doctors, simple artisans and servants, old men and innocent children—all united in a common faith and love for Jesus and his Church. 
<p>Brother Paul Miki, a Jesuit and a native of Japan, has become the best known among the martyrs of Japan. While hanging upon a cross, Paul Miki preached to the people gathered for the execution: “The sentence of judgment says these men came to Japan from the Philippines, but I did not come from any other country. I am a true Japanese. The only reason for my being killed is that I have taught the doctrine of Christ. I certainly did teach the doctrine of Christ. I thank God it is for this reason I die. I believe that I am telling only the truth before I die. I know you believe me and I want to say to you all once again: Ask Christ to help you to become happy. I obey Christ. After Christ’s example I forgive my persecutors. I do not hate them. I ask God to have pity on all, and I hope my blood will fall on my fellow men as a fruitful rain.” </p><p>When missionaries returned to Japan in the 1860s, at first they found no trace of Christianity. But after establishing themselves they found that thousands of Christians lived around Nagasaki and that they had secretly preserved the faith. Beatified in 1627, the martyrs of Japan were finally canonized in 1862.</p> American Catholic Blog By way of analogy, we are taught that we all have the same sun shining on us and we all have the same rain falling on us. It is how we deal with sun and rain, how we deal with the happy and the not-so-happy things of life that causes our interior weather. Basically, we do it to ourselves.

The Gospel of John the Gospel of Relationship

 
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