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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Bridesmaids

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

Annie (Kristen Wiig) is a down-on-her-luck friend and maid of honor to Lillian (Maya Rudolph). Annie also has relationship issues and the man (Jon Hamm) she is sleeping with has no intention of making a commitment.

Problems start when Helen (Rose Byrne) becomes part of the bridal party. She is wealthy, unhappy, and lonely – and will become Lillian’s new sister-in-law. Annie is jealous of Helen’s ability to provide every good thing to make the wedding perfect and throws a hilarious fit. They reconcile and Annie shares memories of growing up as best friends with Lillian.  Helen uses this information to garner Lillian’s favor and events collude to almost bring down the wedding.

Some will think this is a vulgar movie, and some parts of it are. I hesitated before seeing it because it seemed as if were the girls’ answer to “The Hangover” and “The Hangover II” phenomenon of raunch.

Note that Judd Apatow is one of the producers for “Bridesmaids”; he gave us “The Forty Year-Old Virgin” and “Knocked Up”. He uses a “bait and switch” technique to get the attention of male viewers – he creates the grungiest sex and body parts and functions scenarios only to have the main characters realize how superficial their lives are and that relationships, marriage, and family matter.

Director Paul Feig does the same thing in “Bridesmaids”. Some of the scenes were unnecessary and will offend sensibilities, as will the language, but at its core, the film has so much heart and sweetness. The main characters do grow and change for the better, and it’s really funny. Thank God the girls never made it to Vegas (the airlines put them off at Casper International Airport in Wyoming. I went there once to give some presentations and there are antelope grazing beside the tiny terminal; very funny moment.)

So this review is not a recommendation, but there are probably young women in your life that will see it. The question is: what will they learn? I would hope their take away is that casual sex is demeaning and disappointing and that friendships are fragile but they can last forever if we tend to them.


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James Oldo: You’ve heard rags-to-riches stories. Today, we celebrate the reverse. 
<p>James of Oldo was born into a well-to-do family near Milan in 1364. He married a woman who, like him, appreciated the comforts that came with wealth. But an outbreak of plague drove James, his wife and their three children out of their home and into the countryside. Despite those precautions, two of his daughters died from the plague, James determined to use whatever time he had left to build up treasures in heaven and to build God’s realm on earth. </p><p>He and his wife became Secular Franciscans. James gave up his old lifestyle and did penance for his sins. He cared for a sick priest, who taught him Latin. Upon the death of his wife, James himself became a priest. His house was transformed into a chapel where small groups of people, many of them fellow Secular Franciscans, came for prayer and support. James focused on caring for the sick and for prisoners of war. He died in 1404 after contracting a disease from one of his patients. </p><p>James Oldo was beatified in 1933.</p> American Catholic Blog Even when skies are grey and clouds heavy with tears, the sun rises. So to with our souls, burdened by life’s sins and still He rises.

 
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