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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Bridesmaids

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

Annie (Kristen Wiig) is a down-on-her-luck friend and maid of honor to Lillian (Maya Rudolph). Annie also has relationship issues and the man (Jon Hamm) she is sleeping with has no intention of making a commitment.

Problems start when Helen (Rose Byrne) becomes part of the bridal party. She is wealthy, unhappy, and lonely – and will become Lillian’s new sister-in-law. Annie is jealous of Helen’s ability to provide every good thing to make the wedding perfect and throws a hilarious fit. They reconcile and Annie shares memories of growing up as best friends with Lillian.  Helen uses this information to garner Lillian’s favor and events collude to almost bring down the wedding.

Some will think this is a vulgar movie, and some parts of it are. I hesitated before seeing it because it seemed as if were the girls’ answer to “The Hangover” and “The Hangover II” phenomenon of raunch.

Note that Judd Apatow is one of the producers for “Bridesmaids”; he gave us “The Forty Year-Old Virgin” and “Knocked Up”. He uses a “bait and switch” technique to get the attention of male viewers – he creates the grungiest sex and body parts and functions scenarios only to have the main characters realize how superficial their lives are and that relationships, marriage, and family matter.

Director Paul Feig does the same thing in “Bridesmaids”. Some of the scenes were unnecessary and will offend sensibilities, as will the language, but at its core, the film has so much heart and sweetness. The main characters do grow and change for the better, and it’s really funny. Thank God the girls never made it to Vegas (the airlines put them off at Casper International Airport in Wyoming. I went there once to give some presentations and there are antelope grazing beside the tiny terminal; very funny moment.)

So this review is not a recommendation, but there are probably young women in your life that will see it. The question is: what will they learn? I would hope their take away is that casual sex is demeaning and disappointing and that friendships are fragile but they can last forever if we tend to them.


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Peter Chrysologus: A man who vigorously pursues a goal may produce results far beyond his expectations and his intentions. Thus it was with Peter of the Golden Words, as he was called, who as a young man became bishop of Ravenna, the capital of the empire in the West. 
<p>At the time there were abuses and vestiges of paganism evident in his diocese, and these he was determined to battle and overcome. His principal weapon was the short sermon, and many of them have come down to us. They do not contain great originality of thought. They are, however, full of moral applications, sound in doctrine and historically significant in that they reveal Christian life in fifth-century Ravenna. So authentic were the contents of his sermons that, some 13 centuries later, he was declared a doctor of the Church by Pope Benedict XIII. He who had earnestly sought to teach and motivate his own flock was recognized as a teacher of the universal Church. </p><p>In addition to his zeal in the exercise of his office, Peter Chrysologus was distinguished by a fierce loyalty to the Church, not only in its teaching, but in its authority as well. He looked upon learning not as a mere opportunity but as an obligation for all, both as a development of God-given faculties and as a solid support for the worship of God. </p><p>Some time before his death, St. Peter returned to Imola, his birthplace, where he died around A.D. 450.</p> American Catholic Blog Just as Jesus resolutely traveled to Jerusalem, knowing that crucifixion awaited him, we know that we need to seek God’s will and embrace God’s support in all situations—even the necessarily painful ones.

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