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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Midnight in Paris

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

Director/writer Woody Allen’s film opened the Cannes Film Festival earlier this month and it is indeed one of his best films in a long time; clever, sharp, entertaining and though not overly self-conscious as Allen’s films can be, the litany of writers and artists in the film meet Allen’s cinematic requirement for neurosis.

Gil (Owen Wilson) is in Paris with his fiancé Inez (Rachel McAdams) and her parents who have business in the city of lights. Gil is a screenwriter trying to write a novel about a man who runs a nostalgia shop. When a friend of Inez, Paul (Michael Sheen) and his wife run into them in a restaurant, Gil wants nothing to do with the boorish, pseudo-intellectual professor. Instead of dancing, he goes for a walk.

At midnight, a vintage car stops in front of him, and F. Scott Fitzgerald (Tom Hiddleston) and his wife Zelda (Alison Pill) invite him to come along to a party. There he meets expats, or the famous Lost Generation, from America and other countries who form the vibrant artist community of Paris in the 1920s; include Cole Porter and Spanish filmmaker Luis Buñuel.

The funniest encounter is with Hemingway who tosses off words straight from his novels with references to his “A Moveable Feast” and seems itching for a fight. Gil runs into a litany of famous people and falls for Picasso’s mistress, Adrianna (Marion Cotillard)  who wants to live in 1890’s Paris, the city’s “Golden Age”.

Hemingway, or Fitzgerald, tells Gil that “Nostalgia is a flaw of the romantic imagination” and that nostalgia is denial.

There’s something to this, I think. After one of my younger sisters and I saw the 1992 Merchant-Ivory period masterpiece “Howard’s End”, she said, “I was born in the wrong place and the wrong time.” And then she sighed as she grasped her young daughter’s hand to return home.

Gil realizes that living in the present, while appreciating the past, is probably the best way –and that the icons of the past were just humans, too, gifted and flawed. And he decides to move to Paris.




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Sharbel Makhluf: Although this saint never traveled far from the Lebanese village of Beka-Kafra, where he was born, his influence has spread widely. 
<p>Joseph Zaroun Makluf was raised by an uncle because his father, a mule driver, died when Joseph was only three. At the age of 23, Joseph joined the Monastery of St. Maron at Annaya, Lebanon, and took the name Sharbel in honor of a second-century martyr. He professed his final vows in 1853 and was ordained six years later. </p><p>Following the example of the fifth-century St. Maron, Sharbel lived as a hermit from 1875 until his death. His reputation for holiness prompted people to seek him to receive a blessing and to be remembered in his prayers. He followed a strict fast and was very devoted to the Blessed Sacrament. When his superiors occasionally asked him to administer the sacraments to nearby villages, Sharbel did so gladly. </p><p>He died in the late afternoon on Christmas Eve. Christians and non-Christians soon made his tomb a place of pilgrimage and of cures. Pope Paul VI beatified him in 1965 and canonized him 12 years later.</p> American Catholic Blog Bluntly put, children are amateur and immature observers. In the short term, they aren’t always attracted to even the best of examples. Only as they move beyond childhood do they come to fully appreciate and emulate their parents’ ways. Much of good parenting doesn’t make its mark until years later.

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