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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Pirates of the Caribbean:
On Stranger Tides


By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

In this fourth “Pirates of the Caribbean” film, Captain Jack Sparrow is once again trying to escape from the British – this time causing pirate-style chaos right in the center London. He carriage-surfs, much to the delight of the audience. He must discover who is impersonating him and how to find a ship, since the Black Pearl has been sunk, while checking in with his dad (Keith Richards) before shoving off.

This time, it is imperative that he beat the Spaniards and his pirate nemesis Barbarossa (Geoffrey Rush), who has a legitimate commission from King George to find the fountain of youth, before anyone else.

Sparrow ends up on the ship run by the pirate Blackbeard (Ian McShane) and his supposed daughter, Anjelica (Penelope Cruz). Sparrow and Anjelica know one another and they spend the film sparring with one another as much as everyone else.

The film actually addresses themes of religion, superstition, fantasy, redemption through mankind’s endless search for eternal youth so as to avoid death. There’s commentary on clerical missionaries and celibacy, but I am not sure how serious this is meant to be. The voodoo doll, that everyone knows is superstition, calls for some conversation between parents and children, just to make sure they understand it as a comic device rather than a supernatural way to control people.

Any other film might get bogged down in details or a message, but “On Stranger Tides” keeps tying the themes up with weaving rope and sails – literally. The scenic effects, special effects, and art direction express the complex craft of making a highly entertaining multimillion dollar film that keeps our attention from the opening scene.
There are not many female characters in the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise, and it is interesting to analyze their roles in the stories. This is why you must stay with this film until the last credit rolls, or you might get the wrong idea about who really wins the day.




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Cyril of Alexandria: Saints are not born with halos around their heads. Cyril, recognized as a great teacher of the Church, began his career as archbishop of Alexandria, Egypt, with impulsive, often violent, actions. He pillaged and closed the churches of the Novatian heretics (who required those who denied the faith to be rebaptized), participated in the deposing of St. John Chrysostom (September 13) and confiscated Jewish property, expelling the Jews from Alexandria in retaliation for their attacks on Christians. 
<p>Cyril’s importance for theology and Church history lies in his championing the cause of orthodoxy against the heresy of Nestorius, who taught that in Christ there were two persons, one human and one divine.</p><p>The controversy centered around the two natures in Christ. Nestorius would not agree to the title “God-bearer” for Mary (January 1). He preferred “Christ-bearer,” saying there are two distinct persons in Christ (divine and human) joined only by a moral union. He said Mary was not the mother of God but only of the man Christ, whose humanity was only a temple of God. Nestorianism implied that the humanity of Christ was a mere disguise. </p><p>Presiding as the pope’s representative at the Council of Ephesus (431), Cyril condemned Nestorianism and proclaimed Mary truly the “God-bearer” (the mother of the one Person who is truly God and truly human). In the confusion that followed, Cyril was deposed and imprisoned for three months, after which he was welcomed back to Alexandria as a second Athanasius (the champion against Arianism). </p><p>Besides needing to soften some of his opposition to those who had sided with Nestorius, Cyril had difficulties with some of his own allies, who thought he had gone too far, sacrificing not only language but orthodoxy. Until his death, his policy of moderation kept his extreme partisans under control. On his deathbed, despite pressure, he refused to condemn the teacher of Nestorius.</p> American Catholic Blog Father, I have come to the understanding that Jesus asks very little from us, only that we accept him as our friend and love him and care for one another. How simple! And yet how difficult! Please give me grace not to disappoint him, who has given his all for me. I ask this in Jesus's name, Amen.

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