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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Everything Must Go

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

Nick Halsey (Will Farrell) loses his job in sales, his wife, and his home on the same day. He is a recovering alcoholic but lapses into a haze of beer-induced drunkenness, laying in his easy chair in the front lawn. Nick has no idea what to do about his situation. When the cops inform him that he cannot live in his front yard, his AA sponsor, Frank (Michael Pena), a detective, gets him a permit for a yard sale.

Meanwhile, a kid named Kenny (Christopher Jordan Wallace) starts hanging around and Nick hires him to watch his stuff. They become friends and Nick teaches Kenny some baseball while Kenny picks up the art of sales very quickly. A new neighbor moves in across the street, Samantha (Rebecca Hall), who is pregnant with her first child. She and Nick are friendly as she waits for her husband to arrive. She is a photographer and Nick gives her an old camera that belonged to his mother.

Nick is on a five-day journey to find himself. The loss of his job and wife is the start he needs to divest himself of the rest of his belongings. He visits an old girl friend, and realizes he cannot go home again. He is depressed and offers bleak observations to Samantha. She goes home, hurt.

“Everything Must Go” is a kind of parable that lays out the options for middle-aged people who find themselves at a crucial moment, a crossroads, even if it only means crossing the front yard. Nick was treading water, going nowhere at work or in his marriage. He and his wife had decided not to have children. Nick tried drowning in his misery, tried re-connecting with his past, tries to connect with his wife who will not take his calls. In order to go forward, he must unload all the material and in a sense, spiritual, baggage he has accumulated, and start fresh.

The thing is, none of us can go it alone. Kenny and Samantha each contribute to Nick’s future. He also makes a grand front-yard gesture that sets him free.

The film was written and directed by first-timer Dan Rush. He took difficult material and with a good script and Will Farrell’s ability to make a boring character interesting and entertaining, gives thoughtful audiences something that transcends the ordinary, ever so slightly, and maybe just enough.
 


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Augustine of Canterbury: In the year 596, some 40 monks set out from Rome to evangelize the Anglo-Saxons in England. Leading the group was Augustine, the prior of their monastery in Rome. Hardly had he and his men reached Gaul (France) when they heard stories of the ferocity of the Anglo-Saxons and of the treacherous waters of the English Channel. Augustine returned to Rome and to the pope who had sent them—St. Gregory the Great (September 3 )—only to be assured by him that their fears were groundless. 
<p>Augustine again set out. This time the group crossed the English Channel and landed in the territory of Kent, ruled by King Ethelbert, a pagan married to a Christian, Bertha. Ethelbert received them kindly, set up a residence for them in Canterbury and within the year, on Pentecost Sunday, 597, was himself baptized. After being consecrated a bishop in France, Augustine returned to Canterbury, where he founded his see. He constructed a church and monastery near where the present cathedral, begun in 1070, now stands. As the faith spread, additional sees were established at London and Rochester. </p><p>Work was sometimes slow and Augustine did not always meet with success. Attempts to reconcile the Anglo-Saxon Christians with the original Briton Christians (who had been driven into western England by Anglo-Saxon invaders) ended in dismal failure. Augustine failed to convince the Britons to give up certain Celtic customs at variance with Rome and to forget their bitterness, helping him evangelize their Anglo-Saxon conquerors </p><p>Laboring patiently, Augustine wisely heeded the missionary principles—quite enlightened for the times—suggested by Pope Gregory the Great: purify rather than destroy pagan temples and customs; let pagan rites and festivals be transformed into Christian feasts; retain local customs as far as possible. The limited success Augustine achieved in England before his death in 605, a short eight years after he arrived in England, would eventually bear fruit long after in the conversion of England. Augustine of Canterbury can truly be called the “Apostle of England.”</p> American Catholic Blog When we go through pain it is easy to feel abandoned or forgotten, but suffering doesn’t mean God doesn’t love us, He does. Even Jesus suffered, and He was completely without sin.

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CATHOLIC GREETINGS
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Rejoice with a friend who is transitioning from the highs and lows of daily employment.

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Remember today all those who have fought and died for peace.

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As Church we rely on the Holy Spirit to form us in the image of Christ.

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