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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Jumping the Broom

By
Kurt Jensen
Source: Catholic News Service


Laz Alonso and Paula Patton star in a scene from the movie "Jumping the Broom."
Expertly performed faith-tinged family comedies such as "Jumping the Broom" (TriStar) are such a rare and welcome treat, is it even fair to quibble?

We must. The family secret at the heart of the plot is so emotionally painful and morally and legally complex, it would stop people in their tracks in real life, after which they would probably seek out the likes of Dr. Phil.

There is a clergyman on hand -- the Rev. James, played by Bishop T.D. Jakes, senior pastor of the Potter's Field megachurch in Dallas, and also a producer of this film. But director Salim Akil and screenwriters Elizabeth Hunter and Arlene Gibbs use him mostly as window dressing; he offers some wisdom about soul mates early on, and delivers a sermonette at the end.

But, in between, the characters are left to sort out their serious conflicts without his counsel.

It's a false note in an otherwise engaging story about the lead-up to a Martha's Vineyard wedding. The nuptials will unite stockbroker Jason Taylor (Laz Alonso), the son of overprotective Brooklyn postal worker Pam (Loretta Devine), who struggles with anger issues, and lawyer Sabrina Watson (Paula Patton), the daughter of wealthy Claudine and Greg (Angela Bassett and Brian Stokes Mitchell), who are edging toward a divorce.

There are unexpected twists mixed in with the helpings of sweet potato pie and the time-honored formula of upscale vs. downscale. Sabrina and Jason have known each other only six months, and because of a promise she made to God about leading a chaste life, they're not having premarital sex.

Pam's devoted Bible reading, though sincerely pursued, is shown to be less than effective in keeping her on the side of righteousness. And, of course, the Watsons' money and accoutrements prove useless in shielding them from devastating family issues.

Problems are resolved in a series of quick conversations, since the bickering and divergences between the two families (both mothers are masters of the comic slow burn) are mere speed bumps on the way to...well, it is a comedy.

The film contains mature themes; fleeting, mild sexual banter; and a couple of references to masturbation. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III—adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13—parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

*****
Kurt Jensen is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.



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Peter Chrysologus: A man who vigorously pursues a goal may produce results far beyond his expectations and his intentions. Thus it was with Peter of the Golden Words, as he was called, who as a young man became bishop of Ravenna, the capital of the empire in the West. 
<p>At the time there were abuses and vestiges of paganism evident in his diocese, and these he was determined to battle and overcome. His principal weapon was the short sermon, and many of them have come down to us. They do not contain great originality of thought. They are, however, full of moral applications, sound in doctrine and historically significant in that they reveal Christian life in fifth-century Ravenna. So authentic were the contents of his sermons that, some 13 centuries later, he was declared a doctor of the Church by Pope Benedict XIII. He who had earnestly sought to teach and motivate his own flock was recognized as a teacher of the universal Church. </p><p>In addition to his zeal in the exercise of his office, Peter Chrysologus was distinguished by a fierce loyalty to the Church, not only in its teaching, but in its authority as well. He looked upon learning not as a mere opportunity but as an obligation for all, both as a development of God-given faculties and as a solid support for the worship of God. </p><p>Some time before his death, St. Peter returned to Imola, his birthplace, where he died around A.D. 450.</p> American Catholic Blog Prayer should be more listening than speaking. God gave you two ears and one mouth...use them proportionately.

 
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