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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Thor

By
John P. McCarthy
Source: Catholic News Service

Over the centuries, Norse mythology, like its Greek and Roman counterparts, has been appropriated by artists seeking to enlighten as well as by those with the more modest goal of providing entertainment. Based on the exploits of the titular Marvel Comics superhero, "Thor" (Paramount) falls satisfyingly into the latter category.

The potential blockbuster's contributions to cinema, let alone to Western civilization, are negligible, yet it has enough positive qualities to constitute a commendable diversion. While no one will mistake the hammer-wielding protagonist for, say, Wagner's Parsifal or Siegfried, the story's Christian framework is readily discernable, even to moviegoers with less-than-Wagnerian attention spans.

At first glance, British actor/director Kenneth Branagh, best known for his Shakespeare adaptations, was a curious choice to direct. But the decision pays off. Exhibiting a mature, light touch, he presents the epic yarn with economy, balancing thematic portentousness with significant humor.

So, while "Thor" sometimes resembles a mash-up of "Clash of the Titans" and "Race to Witch Mountain," it also bears the intelligent markings of the "Iron Man" mold. Those anticipating a loud, headache-inducing picture will be pleasantly surprised. On the other hand, those looking for cutting-edge special effects may be disappointed. Once again, the 3-D formatting seems obligatory rather than enhancing.

As he's about to crown Thor (Chris Hemsworth) his successor, Odin (Anthony Hopkins), king of the celestial realm of Asgard, instead banishes his son and heir to Earth. Thor's brother Loki (Tom Hiddleston) has engineered the exile by goading the hotheaded warrior-prince to defy Odin and break a truce with the race of Frost Giants.

Down on Earth—in the desert outskirts of a small New Mexico town, to be exact—Thor meets comely astrophysicist Jane Foster (Natalie Portman) and her team, who try to hide the strapping alien from federal authorities. Back up in Asgard, the dissembling Loki seizes the throne from an incapacitated Odin.

Switching back and forth between its two settings, the movie doesn't spend much time explicating any one aspect of the scenario. Branagh and company trust their viewers and the result is neither mindless nor too taxing. However, the pared-down storytelling does make the climax seem fairly abrupt and the rush to a sequel more transparent than usual.

Visually, the special effects are no better than passable. But successful jokes—stemming mostly from the incongruity between Thor's stiff manner and the vagaries of modern life, best represented by Jane's droll assistant Darcy (Kat Dennings)—do provide a counterpoint to the cosmic melodrama.

The notion of a self-sacrificing hero who overcomes pride and takes redemptive action for others certainly registers. And because the narrative has many Christian echoes, "Thor" can't be criticized for propagating a pagan worldview. Besides, the theological implications of the underlying myth are never seriously explored.

The bond between Thor and Jane is both believable and restrained, leading only to a single passionate kiss. While its violence quotient renders "Thor" inappropriate for small children, parents needn't be alarmed if mature middle-schoolers ask to attend.

Such pure models of heroism and nobility are quite rare on screen nowadays, after all, and therefore quite refreshing.

The film contains much moderately intense, but bloodless, hand-to-hand combat, a few scary sequences and a couple of mild oaths. The Catholic News Service classification is A-II—adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13—parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

*****
John P. McCarthy is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.



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Gabriel of Our Lady of Sorrows: Born in Italy into a large family and baptized Francis, he lost his mother when he was only four years old. He was educated by the Jesuits and, having been cured twice of serious illnesses, came to believe that God was calling him to the religious life. Young Francis wished to join the Jesuits but was turned down, probably because of his age, not yet 17. Following the death of a sister to cholera, his resolve to enter religious life became even stronger and he was accepted by the Passionists. Upon entering the novitiate he was given the name Gabriel of Our Lady of Sorrows.
<p>Ever popular and cheerful, Gabriel quickly was successful in his effort to be faithful in little things. His spirit of prayer, love for the poor, consideration of the feelings of others, exact observance of the Passionist Rule as well as his bodily penances—always subject to the will of his wise superiors— made a deep impression on everyone.
</p><p>His superiors had great expectations of Gabriel as he prepared for the priesthood, but after only four years of religious life symptoms of tuberculosis appeared. Ever obedient, he patiently bore the painful effects of the disease and the restrictions it required, seeking no special notice. He died peacefully on February 27, 1862, at age 24, having been an example to both young and old.
</p><p>Gabriel of Our Lady of Sorrows was canonized in 1920.</p> American Catholic Blog Life is not always happy, but our connections to others can create a simple and grace-filled quiet celebration of our own and others’ lives. These others are the presence of Christ in our lives.


 
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