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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Madea's Big Happy Family

By
Kurt Jensen
Source: Catholic News Service


David Mann and Tyler Perry star in a scene from the movie "Madea's Big Happy Family."
Tyler Perry's broadly drawn morality plays, which include the stage version of "Madea's Big Happy Family" (Lionsgate), have proven so surefire with their targeted audience as to be critic-proof.

In these earthy, over-the-top crowd-pleasers, insults fly, family problems are solved, children learn to defer to adults and short-tempered Madea (Perry in a muumuu) occasionally slaps wrongdoers -- to wild audience cheers. But there's a warm heart somewhere as well as a happy ending; the plays exist in a sentimental universe of their own.

In motion picture form, however, the flaws become more apparent, and they're not above criticism -- nor should they be.

The problem is not in the simple plot, in which Madea's appealingly gentle niece Shirley (Loretta Devine) learns she has terminal cancer and tries to gather her three adult children—Tammy (Natalie Desselle Reid), Kimberly (Shannon Kane) and Byron (Shad "Bow Wow" Moss)—at her house to tell them the bad news.

The grown siblings, we discover, are all locked in dysfunctional relationships, sometimes with insolent children, while recently released ex-con Byron is also dabbling again in the drug dealing that landed him in jail.

The genuinely troublesome parts of this adaptation—which Perry both wrote and directed—consist of bug-eyed characterizations and comments that invoke not so much old racial stereotypes, as newly minted ones of Perry's own creation. These begin with Madea's pot-smoking sister Aunt Bam (Cassi Davis), who supposedly has co-matriarch status with Madea as a moral force, but spends the first half of the film in a literal haze.

There's a particularly ugly comment, moreover, aimed by Madea at husband Joe (also Perry) when she refers to him as a "silverback."

Worthy messages about spouses respecting each other, children obeying adults and families learning to function as a unit while buffeted by the stresses of modern life get somewhat overshadowed by all this unsettling material.

Madea, to Tyler's credit, is never as simplistic as the Atlanta milieu in which she's placed. Although she has no particular religious precepts of her own—she explains that she knows God is angry at her—she fully expects her relatives to live up to the Christian faith they profess to have, and she manages to produce a few fractured Biblical quotations along the way.

Such an off-kilter but engaged approach to religion could yield some interesting results; it's too bad they're largely lost in a flurry of slaps upside the head.

The film contains marijuana use, some adult humor, fleeting crass language and slapstick violence. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III—adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13—parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

*****
Kurt Jensen is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.



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Junipero Serra: In 1776, when the American Revolution was beginning in the east, another part of the future United States was being born in California. That year a gray-robed Franciscan founded Mission San Juan Capistrano, now famous for its annually returning swallows. San Juan was the seventh of nine missions established under the direction of this indomitable Spaniard. 
<p>Born on Spain’s island of Mallorca, Serra entered the Franciscan Order, taking the name of St. Francis’ childlike companion, Brother Juniper. Until he was 35, he spent most of his time in the classroom—first as a student of theology and then as a professor. He also became famous for his preaching. Suddenly he gave it all up and followed the yearning that had begun years before when he heard about the missionary work of St. Francis Solanus in South America. Junipero’s desire was to convert native peoples in the New World. </p><p>Arriving by ship at Vera Cruz, Mexico, he and a companion walked the 250 miles to Mexico City. On the way Junipero’s left leg became infected by an insect bite and would remain a cross—sometimes life-threatening—for the rest of his life. For 18 years he worked in central Mexico and in the Baja Peninsula. He became president of the missions there. </p><p>Enter politics: the threat of a Russian invasion south from Alaska. Charles III of Spain ordered an expedition to beat Russia to the territory. So the last two <i>conquistadors</i>—one military, one spiritual—began their quest. José de Galvez persuaded Junipero to set out with him for present-day Monterey, California. The first mission founded after the 900-mile journey north was San Diego (1769). That year a shortage of food almost canceled the expedition. Vowing to stay with the local people, Junipero and another friar began a novena in preparation for St. Joseph’s day, March 19, the scheduled day of departure. On that day, the relief ship arrived. </p><p>Other missions followed: Monterey/Carmel (1770); San Antonio and San Gabriel (1771); San Luís Obispo (1772); San Francisco and San Juan Capistrano (1776); Santa Clara (1777); San Buenaventura (1782). Twelve more were founded after Serra’s death. </p><p>Junipero made the long trip to Mexico City to settle great differences with the military commander. He arrived at the point of death. The outcome was substantially what Junipero sought: the famous “Regulation” protecting the Indians and the missions. It was the basis for the first significant legislation in California, a “Bill of Rights” for Native Americans. </p><p>Because the Native Americans were living a nonhuman life from the Spanish point of view, the friars were made their legal guardians. The Native Americans were kept at the mission after Baptism lest they be corrupted in their former haunts—a move that has brought cries of “injustice” from some moderns. </p><p>Junipero’s missionary life was a long battle with cold and hunger, with unsympathetic military commanders and even with danger of death from non-Christian native peoples. Through it all his unquenchable zeal was fed by prayer each night, often from midnight till dawn. He baptized over 6,000 people and confirmed 5,000. His travels would have circled the globe. He brought the Native Americans not only the gift of faith but also a decent standard of living. He won their love, as witnessed especially by their grief at his death. He is buried at Mission San Carlo Borromeo, Carmel, and was beatified in 1988.</p> American Catholic Blog God is great. God is good. And God, in his fatherly love, has a plan for our lives that will work out for our benefit and salvation. All we have to do is trust and obey.

Spiritual Resilience

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Blessed Junipero Serra
This Franciscan friar was instrumental in founding many of California’s mission churches.

Happy Birthday
May this birthday mark the beginning of new and exciting adventures!

Sts. Peter and Paul
Honored both separately and together, these apostles were probably martyred during the reign of the emperor Nero.

Wedding
Help the bride and groom see their love as a mirror of God’s love.

Our Lady of Perpetual Help
God gave Mary to us as a help in our quest for holiness.




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