AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Source Code

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service


Michelle Monaghan and Jake Gyllenhaal star in "Source Code."
Taut direction by Duncan Jones and game performances all around help disguise the logical conundrums underlying the time travel-themed sci-fi thriller "Source Code" (Summit).

As for the musings on life, death and parallel existences that crop up in Ben Ripley's screenplay, these are too confused either to challenge or reinforce beliefs of any stripe. Instead we're left—as the closing credits roll—with a perfectly acceptable, though hardly original, message about seizing the day.

At the other end of the film's sometimes grim and often claustrophobic proceedings, we're as befuddled as he is when heroic Afghan War veteran Capt. Colter Stevens (Jake Gyllenhaal) awakens to find himself inhabiting the body of a stranger. Accompanied, apparently, by his girlfriend (Michelle Monaghan), said alter ego is a passenger on a Chicago-bound commuter train.

Long before Stevens can even begin to figure out what he's doing there, however, the train is suddenly engulfed by a huge explosion, with obviously fatal consequences for everyone on board.

Jolted awake again—this time in an environment that resembles the helicopter he pilots in combat—Stevens gradually discovers that he's part of a cutting-edge antiterrorism operation being run by Air Force Capt. Colleen Goodwin (Vera Farmiga).

As Goodwin explains via a video hookup, Stevens' task is to keep reliving the last eight minutes of the other man's life until he can identify the plotter who bombed the train, thereby forestalling a far worse follow-up attack.

The technology enabling Stevens to do so has been developed by Dr. Rutledge (Jeffrey Wright), an obviously over-intense, perhaps quasi-mad military scientist with an interest in harnessing the "afterglow" of dying people's consciousness.

As "Groundhog Day" meets a Kafka novel, the downbeat atmosphere is offset by an emphasis on Stevens' humanity. Thus we witness him falling for Monaghan's character in one reality—their unique circumstances, needless to say, preclude any premarital shenanigans—and soliciting Goodwin's help to reconnect with his estranged father in the other.

Both experiences eventually involve a blurring of chronology—not to mention the relation of cause and effect—that defies sober analysis. But most viewers will likely be happy enough with the surface entertainment on offer not to ask too many probing questions.

The film contains recurring action violence, some of it potentially disturbing, brief gory medical images, about a half-dozen uses of profanity, at least one instance of the F-word and some crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III—adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13—parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

*****

Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.



Search reviews at CatholicMovieReviews.org


Thank you for your comments. Editors will review all posts before they are visible on the website.

blog comments powered by Disqus







Maria Goretti: One of the largest crowds ever assembled for a canonization—250,000—symbolized the reaction of millions touched by the simple story of Maria Goretti. 
<p>She was the daughter of a poor Italian tenant farmer, had no chance to go to school, never learned to read or write. When she made her First Communion not long before her death at age 12, she was one of the larger and somewhat backward members of the class. </p><p>On a hot afternoon in July, Maria was sitting at the top of the stairs of her house, mending a shirt. She was not quite 12 years old, but physically mature. A cart stopped outside, and a neighbor, Alessandro, 18 years old, ran up the stairs. He seized her and pulled her into a bedroom. She struggled and tried to call for help. “No, God does not wish it," she cried out. "It is a sin. You would go to hell for it.” Alessandro began striking at her blindly with a long dagger. </p><p>She was taken to a hospital. Her last hours were marked by the usual simple compassion of the good—concern about where her mother would sleep, forgiveness of her murderer (she had been in fear of him, but did not say anything lest she cause trouble to his family) and her devout welcoming of Viaticum, her last Holy Communion. She died about 24 hours after the attack. </p><p>Her murderer was sentenced to 30 years in prison. For a long time he was unrepentant and surly. One night he had a dream or vision of Maria, gathering flowers and offering them to him. His life changed. When he was released after 27 years, his first act was to go to beg the forgiveness of Maria’s mother. </p><p>Devotion to the young martyr grew, miracles were worked, and in less than half a century she was canonized. At her beatification in 1947, her mother (then 82), two sisters and a brother appeared with Pope Pius XII on the balcony of St. Peter’s. Three years later, at her canonization, a 66-year-old Alessandro Serenelli knelt among the quarter-million people and cried tears of joy.</p> American Catholic Blog Lord, may the medals we wear be constant reminders of the lives they depict. While wearing them, may we be blessed through the saints’ intercession and protected from harm. Help us to continue to spread the messages of Jesus and Mary and the saints and angels.

The Gospel of John the Gospel of Relationship

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Birthday
Send a wish that each tomorrow of the coming year will be full of life and peace!

Mary's Flower - Columbine
Mary, let us follow your footprints. Even better, teach us to walk in your shoes.

Independence Day
Happy Fourth of July from Catholic Greetings and AmericanCatholic.org!

Name Day
No e-card for their patron? Don't worry, a name day greeting fills the bill!

Vacation
Enter the holiday spirit by sending an e-card to schedule a summer cookout!




Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2015