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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

The Lincoln Lawyer

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service


Michael Pena and Matthew McConaughey star in the thriller "The Lincoln Lawyer."
A generally engaging central character, convincingly brought to life by Matthew McConaughey, lends verve to "The Lincoln Lawyer" (Lionsgate). Yet, though vibrant, this thriller is also frequently seamy and includes numerous moral and visual elements that narrowly circumscribe its appropriate audience.

McConaughey plays the titular Los Angeles attorney, Michael "Mick" Haller, a peripatetic defender of petty criminals whose classic Lincoln Continental—license plate: "NTGUILTY"—serves as his traveling office. Though given to ethical corner-cutting, Mick is fundamentally decent, and usually has his clients' best interests at heart.

On the personal side, too, Mick longs to reconcile with his ex-wife, Maggie (Marisa Tomei), a prosecutor with whom he has a young daughter.

When Mick is offered the chance to represent Beverly Hills playboy Louis Roulet (Ryan Phillippe), scion of a powerful real estate dynasty, it seems like an easy step up to the big time. All the more so, since the high-profile case against Louis—he's charged with the attempted murder of a girl he picked up in a singles bar—at first seems quite flimsy.

Clues uncovered by Mick's intrepid investigator—and longtime friend—Frank Levin (William H. Macy), however, soon suggest a murkier scenario.

Driven by McConaughey's kinetic performance, director Brad Furman's adaptation of Michael Connelly's novel makes for a lively drama, both inside the courtroom and beyond.

But its protagonist's occasional scams and eventual resort to borderline vigilantism, his client's libertine lifestyle and—above all—acrid flashbacks detailing violent sexual assaults all mark this whodunit as off-limits for young or casual viewers. Well-grounded adults disposed to take on challenging material, on the other hand, may discern at least a few glints amid the grit.

The film contains considerable explicit violence—including scenes of rape—vigilantism issues, brief nongraphic marital lovemaking, fleeting rear nudity, a half-dozen uses of profanity, a few rough terms and much crude and crass language. The Catholic News Service classification is L—limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R—restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

*****
John Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.




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Irenaeus: The Church is fortunate that Irenaeus was involved in many of its controversies in the second century. He was a student, well trained, no doubt, with great patience in investigating, tremendously protective of apostolic teaching, but prompted more by a desire to win over his opponents than to prove them in error. 
<p>As bishop of Lyons he was especially concerned with the Gnostics, who took their name from the Greek word for “knowledge.” Claiming access to secret knowledge imparted by Jesus to only a few disciples, their teaching was attracting and confusing many Christians. After thoroughly investigating the various Gnostic sects and their “secret,” Irenaeus showed to what logical conclusions their tenets led. These he contrasted with the teaching of the apostles and the text of Holy Scripture, giving us, in five books, a system of theology of great importance to subsequent times. Moreover, his work, widely used and translated into Latin and Armenian, gradually ended the influence of the Gnostics. </p><p>The circumstances and details about his death, like those of his birth and early life in Asia Minor, are not at all clear.</p> American Catholic Blog Remember this: the Lord wants us to be at peace, and the closer we are to Him, the more peaceful we feel. Peace is a good indicator that our actions are pleasing to Him. On the other hand, a persistent lack of peace typically indicates that the Lord is trying to get your attention. Give Him that attention, and He will show you what's up!

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