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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Red Riding Hood

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service


Amanda Seyfried stars in "Red Riding Hood."
A tipoff to the off-kilter portrayal of the church that mars "Red Riding Hood" (Warner Bros.)—an uninvolving update of the classic fairy tale—comes when an attendant gravely announces the arrival on the scene of "His Eminence, Father Solomon."

Such an ecclesiastical gaffe might be forgiven with a smile, did not Father Solomon (Gary Oldman) shortly turn out to be a cynical, sensual inquisitor. A priest renowned for laying lycanthropes low, he has come to the imaginary medieval village of Daggerhorn, where we lay our scene, to rid it of its resident werewolf.

(You can almost hear the pitch meeting: "He's not just a wolf, he's a werewolf!")

Said creature—long held in check by the townsfolk's offering of a chained pig for him to devour every full moon—has lately returned to the rampage, with fatal consequences for the sister of the titular maiden (Amanda Seyfried) who here goes by the name Valerie.

Poor Valerie's life is complicated enough without marauding monsters to worry about. As the opening scenes reveal, she is caught in a love triangle with Peter (Shiloh Fernandez)—the youth she has loved since childhood—in one corner, and Henry (Max Irons)—scion of the richest family in town to whom she has been unwillingly betrothed—in the other.

Valerie, needless to say, lives only for romance, but her more practical-minded parents Suzette (Virginia Madsen) and Cesaire (Billy Burke) think hubby Henry will put food on the table. Where is a girl to turn for solace? Why to Grandmother's (Julie Christie) house, of course.

Father Solomon, meanwhile, has infected Daggerhorn with paranoia by announcing to the assembled citizenry that the wolf-man is no stranger, but someone in their very midst.

This might have been the departure point for an interesting study in mutual suspicion, along the lines of Arthur Miller's anti-McCarthy allegory, "The Crucible."

Instead, Father Solomon busies himself torturing a defenseless half-wit before setting his prosecutorial sights on Valerie, after deciding the girl in the harlot-colored hood—who, it turns out, can communicate with his beastly adversary—is a witch.

Peter and Henry put their rivalry aside and struggle gallantly to spring her from Solomon's clutches. (Even so, one doubts the appearance, anytime soon, of T-shirts reading "Camp Peter" or "Camp Henry.")

Though screenwriter David Leslie Johnson is to be commended for turning out a script virtually devoid of objectionable language, he has included a scene where only chance intervenes to prevent the physical consummation of Valerie and Peter's bond.

As directed by Catherine Hardwicke, moreover, the glum proceedings are low on entertainment value or emotional impact. As for the complexities of church history embodied in Father Solomon's problematic persona, while well-grounded adults may be counted on to sort them through, they make this "Twilight" wannabe totally unsuitable for its targeted teen audience.

The film contains a skewed treatment of Catholicism, brief nongraphic premarital sexual activity and moderate but sometimes gory violence. The Catholic News Service classification is L—limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13—parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

*****
John Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.





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Antonio Lucci: Antonio studied with and was a friend of St. Francesco Antonio Fasani, who after Antonio Lucci’s death testified at the diocesan hearings regarding the holiness of Lucci. 
<p>Born in Agnone in southern Italy, a city famous for manufacturing bells and copper crafts, he was given the name Angelo at Baptism. He attended the local school run by the Conventual Franciscans and joined them at the age of 16. Antonio completed his studies for the priesthood in Assisi, where he was ordained in 1705. Further studies led to a doctorate in theology and appointments as a teacher in Agnone, Ravello and Naples. He also served as guardian in Naples. </p><p>Elected minister provincial in 1718, the following year he was appointed professor at St. Bonaventure College in Rome, a position he held until Pope Benedict XIII chose him as bishop of Bovino (near Foggia) in 1729. The pope explained, "I have chosen as bishop of Bovino an eminent theologian and a great saint." </p><p>His 23 years as bishop were marked by visits to local parishes and a renewal of gospel living among the people of his diocese. He dedicated his episcopal income to works of education and charity. At the urging of the Conventual minister general, Bishop Lucci wrote a major book about the saints and blesseds in the first 200 years of the Conventual Franciscans. </p><p>He was beatified in 1989, three years after his friend Francesco Antonio Fasani was canonized.</p> American Catholic Blog Not too many people need academia to teach them the power of positives. That has been known since Adam and Eve. The soul of strong family life is wrapped throughout with positives—love, affection, praise, commitment. The more a child receives the positives, the less he gives the negatives.

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