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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

The Eagle

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service


Jamie Bell and Channing Tatum star in "The Eagle."
The contradictions of imperialism and the relationship of a marginal culture to a temporarily dominant one are background themes that add some depth to the period action-adventure movie "The Eagle" (Focus).

Even so, adults and mature teens who approach this vigorous screen version of Rosemary Sutcliff's popular 1954 novel "The Eagle of the Ninth" looking for nothing more than a swords-and-sandals outing—or a toga-toting buddy movie—will likely come away satisfied as well.

Taking that outing and making for an unlikely pair of pals are Marcus Aquila (Channing Tatum), a young Roman soldier stationed in second-century Britain, and his native slave, Esca (Jamie Bell). Together they embark on a quest to recover the titular military symbol lost 20 years earlier when the legion Marcus' father, Flavius, commanded disappeared, under unexplained circumstances, in the wilds of modern-day Scotland.

Tormented since childhood by Flavius' ambiguous legacy—did Dad fight to the end or show cowardice by abandoning this gilded emblem of Rome's honor?—Marcus hopes to restore both national and familial pride by returning the totem to imperial custody.

But to achieve this, he will have to journey beyond Hadrian's Wall, the northern limit of the Empire, an undertaking considered impossibly reckless by the cautious uncle (Donald Sutherland) at whose villa Marcus has been recuperating from the battle wounds that put an end to his active military career.

In fact, once he enters this alien world populated by hostile Britons, Marcus will be wholly dependent on Esca as interpreter and guide. Yet, Esca himself is unsure of his loyalties.

As the enslaved son of a local chieftain killed by the occupier, Esca detests Rome and everything it represents. But his first encounter with his master ended with Marcus saving the lad's life, an act Esca —no stranger to the concept of honor himself -- feels duty-bound to repay with faithful service.

Their arduous journey sees the fraught relationship between these representatives of competing civilizations veer from friendship to hostility to mutual understanding, and displays the moral shadings present in both their communities.

Director Kevin Macdonald keeps the pace lively and the battles mostly gore-free while a sense of conflict-transcending human solidarity helps leaven the macho atmosphere that permeates Jeremy Brock's screenplay. (Not only is there no "love angle" in the story, there's nary a female character to be seen.)

Despite the elements listed below, the moral lessons awaiting attentive viewers of this historical expedition make it probably acceptable for older adolescents.

The film contains considerable but largely bloodless combat violence, brief distant images of unclothed corpses, a single use of the S-word and a couple of crass terms. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III—adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13—parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

*****
John Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.


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Conrad of Parzham: Conrad spent most of his life as porter in Altoetting, Bavaria, letting people into the friary and indirectly encouraging them to let God into their lives. 
<p>His parents, Bartholomew and Gertrude Birndorfer, lived near Parzham, Bavaria. In those days this region was recovering from the Napoleonic wars. A lover of solitary prayer and a peacemaker as a young man, Conrad joined the Capuchins as a brother. He made his profession in 1852 and was assigned to the friary in Altoetting. That city’s shrine to Mary was very popular; at the nearby Capuchin friary there was a lot of work for the porter, a job Conrad held for 41 years. </p><p>At first some of the other friars were jealous that such a young friar held this important job. Conrad’s patience and holy life overcame their doubts. As porter he dealt with many people, obtaining many of the friary supplies and generously providing for the poor who came to the door. He treated them all with the courtesy Francis expected of his followers. </p><p>Conrad’s helpfulness was sometimes unnerving. Once Father Vincent, seeking quiet to prepare a sermon, went up the belltower of the church. Conrad tracked him down when someone wanting to go to confession specifically requested Father Vincent. </p><p>Conrad also developed a special rapport with the children of the area. He enthusiastically promoted the Seraphic Work of Charity, which aided neglected children. </p><p>Conrad spent hours in prayer before the Blessed Sacrament. He regularly asked the Blessed Mother to intercede for him and for the many people he included in his prayers. The ever-patient Conrad was canonized in 1934.</p> American Catholic Blog We let the devil exist by continuing to rebel against God. Satan tempts us, but we choose to sin. The devil can’t read our minds, but he can see our weaknesses. God has overcome the snares of the devil, though. When we live in Him, we have no reason to fear.


 
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