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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Country Strong

By
Kurt Jensen
Source: Catholic News Service


Oscar-winner Gwyneth Paltrow and Tim McGraw star in "Country Strong."
"Country Strong" (Screen Gems) wears its mawkish cliches proudly on its flannel sleeves.

That's often not a bad thing—or at least excusable—if all you're looking for is a guilty-pleasure, two-hour escape of nonstop and quite effective country music. Were it only that simple.

Instead, writer-director Shana Feste sends four one-dimensional characters—all of them shown to be moral and caring when their ambitions or pathologies haven't taken over—spinning like pinballs in a twangy, shopworn tale of substance abuse, adultery and the grim lifestyle played out on a tour bus.

It's the DNA of most country songs—the sad ones, anyway—but it's likely to insult its target audience, who are perfectly capable of appreciating a better-limned story.

Gwyneth Paltrow is Kelly Canter, an emotionally fragile country queen who fell into a spiral of alcohol and drugs that resulted in a miscarriage five months into a pregnancy.

Just getting out of rehab as the story begins, Kelly is also coping with a loveless marriage to her ambitious and manipulative promoter James (Tim McGraw). As she explains to her on-again-off-again lover Beau Hutton (Garrett Hedlund), "We don't kiss with our mouths open anymore."

Right away, James puts Kelly on a comeback tour that is supposed to end in a triumphal return to Dallas, the scene of her miscarriage and disastrous public meltdown. Beau is a very appealing country singer himself, and James pairs him with neurotic beauty queen-turned-singer Chiles Stanton (Leighton Meester)—on whom he has designs as well—to serve as Kelly's warm-up act.

Kelly—whose mascara is running in nearly every scene (sometimes she's holding a bottle of booze, too, just to underline the point)—is, of course, in no shape to perform. She can't finish a song in Houston, is too drunk to perform on "Austin City Limits" and is jealous of Chiles' youth and beauty. She also occasionally engages in promiscuous sex.

Beau always cares, which is why—in a thoroughly immoral and messy state of, well, affairs—both women share him. James, by contrast, is only interested in getting his wife on stage before the cheering throngs.

In one tasteless sequence involving an image-burnishing visit for the Make-A-Wish Foundation, Kelly warmly improvises a song for a cancer-stricken boy in his classroom. Watching, James briefly realizes why he loved Kelly in the first place and—as her band plays—they pair up and dance, ignoring the sick lad.

At that point we're forced to wonder: "Who cares what happens to these two self-absorbed clods?"

The film contains scenes of implied adulterous and premarital sex, pervasive crude language and fleeting profanity. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III—adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13—parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

*****
Kurt Jensen is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.


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John Bosco: John Bosco’s theory of education could well be used in today’s schools. It was a preventive system, rejecting corporal punishment and placing students in surroundings removed from the likelihood of committing sin. He advocated frequent reception of the sacraments of Penance and Holy Communion. He combined catechetical training and fatherly guidance, seeking to unite the spiritual life with one’s work, study and play. 
<p>Encouraged during his youth to become a priest so he could work with young boys, John was ordained in 1841. His service to young people started when he met a poor orphan and instructed him in preparation for receiving Holy Communion. He then gathered young apprentices and taught them catechism. </p><p>After serving as chaplain in a hospice for working girls, John opened the Oratory of St. Francis de Sales for boys. Several wealthy and powerful patrons contributed money, enabling him to provide two workshops for the boys, shoemaking and tailoring. </p><p>By 1856, the institution had grown to 150 boys and had added a printing press for publication of religious and catechetical pamphlets. His interest in vocational education and publishing justify him as patron of young apprentices and Catholic publishers. </p><p>John’s preaching fame spread and by 1850 he had trained his own helpers because of difficulties in retaining young priests. In 1854 he and his followers informally banded together, inspired by St. Francis de Sales [January 24]. </p><p>With Pope Pius IX’s encouragement, John gathered 17 men and founded the Salesians in 1859. Their activity concentrated on education and mission work. Later, he organized a group of Salesian Sisters to assist girls.</p> American Catholic Blog How do you expect to reach your own perfection by leading someone else’s life? His sanctity will never be yours; you must have the humility to work out your own salvation in a darkness where you are absolutely alone.

 
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