AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

How Do You Know

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service


Oscar-winner Reese Witherspoon and Paul Rudd star in "How Do You Know."
An uncomfortable blend of self-absorption and sexual waywardness on the part of its major characters prevents the cheerless romantic comedy "How Do You Know" (Columbia) from engaging viewers.

Instead, the few laughs and insights provided by writer-director James L. Brooks' script hardly seem worthwhile, all the more so given that subjects such as womanizing and single motherhood are played for laughs.

Having just been cut from her team, champion softball player Lisa (Reese Witherspoon)—a dedicated athlete who has poured her all into the sport—faces an uncertain professional future. Her amorous prospects don't seem much more promising when she wakes up on the morning after a one-night stand beside major league baseball player Matty (Owen Wilson).

Though good-natured, Matty is also an unabashed philanderer who—as Lisa discovers—keeps a closet in his apartment stocked with women's clothing for the convenience of his overnight "guests."

When Matty's straightforwardness about his lifestyle inspires Lisa to recognize that a satisfying roll in the hay was all she was really after, this is not only treated as some sort of positive revelation but, paradoxically, as the basis for an ongoing relationship between the two.

But Lisa is still playing the field, so she accepts a dinner invitation from neurotic businessman George (Paul Rudd). Facing an indictment for stock fraud that could land him in jail—and destroy the company founded by his hard-driving dad, Charles (Jack Nicholson)—George is as forlorn as Lisa.

Though the pair passes their first meal together in miserable silence, contemplating their woes, George is nonetheless drawn to his new companion.

As matters progress, Lisa moves in with Matty, but keeps George stringing along as well. While Lisa tries to choose between her suitors, this oddly unsympathetic trio wastes the audience's time endlessly analyzing their every emotion and reaction. Does Lisa want to talk about her fears or just keep mum? Should Matty really have said what he just did or was it a big mistake? And what should George do about his bullying father?

A subplot about George's plucky secretary, Annie (Kathryn Hahn), finds her pregnant but unmarried. While the story line moves toward an acceptable resolution, there is no suggestion along the way that her behavior involves any questionable moral choices. Rather, her out-of-control hormones are treated as comic fodder.

Although themes dealing with the insecurity that accompanies unemployment and the complications caused by financial double-dealing may be intended to strike a timely chord with moviegoers, the real question raised by this exercise in extended navel-gazing is not so much "how do you know?" as "why should you care?"

The film contains brief nongraphic sexual activity, a nonmarital situation, a promiscuity theme, an out-of-wedlock pregnancy, a birth-control reference, at least one use of profanity as well as a couple of rough and a few crude words. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III—adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13—parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

*****
John Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.


Search reviews at CatholicMovieReviews.org


Thank you for your comments. Editors will review all posts before they are visible on the website.

blog comments powered by Disqus







John Kanty: John was a country lad who made good in the big city and the big university of Kraków, Poland. After brilliant studies he was ordained a priest and became a professor of theology. The inevitable opposition which saints encounter led to his being ousted by rivals and sent to be a parish priest at Olkusz. An extremely humble man, he did his best, but his best was not to the liking of his parishioners. Besides, he was afraid of the responsibilities of his position. But in the end he won his people’s hearts. After some time he returned to Kraków and taught Scripture for the remainder of his life. 
<p>He was a serious man, and humble, but known to all the poor of Kraków for his kindness. His goods and his money were always at their disposal, and time and again they took advantage of him. He kept only the money and clothes absolutely needed to support himself. He slept little, and then on the floor, ate sparingly, and took no meat. He made a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, hoping to be martyred by the Turks. He made four pilgrimages to Rome, carrying his luggage on his back. When he was warned to look after his health, he was quick to point out that, for all their austerity, the fathers of the desert lived remarkably long lives.</p> American Catholic Blog If we can see the face of God in the child whose birth we celebrate, then we will see the face of God in the man whose death has set us free, whose blood inebriates our hearts and causes them to sing, glory to God in the highest and on earth peace to those on whom his favor rests.

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
Thirsting for God
Feast on these daily reflections from Mother Teresa to discover the secrets of a life fully surrendered to God.
Sisterhood of Saints
Enjoy a daily dose of guidance and inspiration from widely known female saints such as Sts. Monica, Teresa of Avila, Thérèse of Lisieux, Joan, and Bernadette.
New from Richard Rohr
"This Franciscan message is sorely needed in the world...." —Publishers Weekly
Who Inspired Thomas Merton?
Learn new ways of living in harmony with God, creation, and others, courtesy of St. Francis and Thomas Merton.
A New Daily Devotional for 2015
"A practical and appealing daily guide to the Poor Man of Assisi." —Margaret Carney, O.S.F., president, St. Bonaventure University

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Advent - "O Antiphons"
“Come, O Emmanuel” Use a Catholic Greetings e-card to share your Christmas Eve plans.
Advent - "O Antiphons"
“Come, O King of the Nations” Use Catholic Greetings to remind friends of holiday get-togethers.
Fourth Sunday of Advent - "O Antiphons"
"Come, O Radiant Dawn" Before dinner this evening gather your family around the Advent wreath and light all four candles.
Fourth Sunday of Advent - "O Antiphons"
“Come, O Key of David” Before dinner this evening gather your family around the Advent wreath and light all four candles.
Advent - "O Antiphons"
“Come, O Root of Jesse” Christmas is less than a week away! Take time now to schedule e-cards for a later delivery.



Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2014