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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Morning Glory

By
John P. McCarthy
Source: Catholic News Service


Rachel McAdams, Diane Keaton and Harrison Ford star in "Morning Glory."
It's no surprise that the newsroom comedy "Morning Glory" (Paramount) brings to mind the classic sitcom "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" and the 1987 feature film "Broadcast News." Both were created by James L. Brooks, who wasn't involved in this project but whose influence is keenly felt.

While "Morning Glory" lacks the sharp wit of "Broadcast News," the modest success of this screwball, working-girl comedy can be attributed to the portrayal of the central character, Becky Fuller, by Canadian actress Rachel McAdams. Miss Fuller sparkles as a worthy big-screen successor to that iconic Twin Cities' newswoman, Ms. Mary Richards.

After being fired for budgetary reasons from a local morning show in New Jersey, 28-year-old Becky lands a job in Manhattan as the executive producer of "Daybreak," the struggling morning offering of a national network.

Preternaturally vivacious and enthusiastic, Becky is extremely capable, despite coming across as slightly ditzy. Tasked with reviving the under-budgeted, perpetually ridiculed program, she arranges for venerable reporter Mike Pomeroy (Harrison Ford) to assume co-anchor duties alongside Colleen Peck (Diane Keaton).

Thanks to McAdams, who has received strong notices for her work in movies such as "Mean Girls" and "The Notebook," "Morning Glory" has an appealing glow without ever achieving comedic glory.

With Ford and Keaton tending to growl and grimace without much conviction, there's significant pressure on McAdams to carry the film, just as there is on Becky to salvage "Daybreak." The key is that she never makes Becky's verve seem like "repellant moxie," despite Mike's initially harsh assessment to that effect.

Becky's optimism and can-do spirit is the most salubrious aspect of "Morning Glory." Her adeptness at playing hardball with colleagues when necessary proves she's no Pollyanna, however; likewise her morally unacceptable decision to sleep with fellow producer Adam Bennett (Patrick Wilson).

Unfortunately, Aline Brosh McKenna's script ultimately sides with fluff over substance given that Becky's mission becomes persuading dinosaur Mike to relax his standards. Unfortunately, her philosophy that "no story is too high or too low to reach for" is borne out as the movie gently mocks then ultimately celebrates the public's assumed preference for light fare over hard news.

In addition to leaning on the talents of his versatile star, director Robert Michell ("Notting Hill") lets music and montages do most of the storytelling. The dialogue is sprinkled throughout with ribald remarks that—along with that unseen coupling—make "Morning Glory" acceptable only for mature audiences.

The film contains nongraphic sexual activity, an off-screen encounter, several uses of profanity, two instances of rough language, much crude and crass talk, numerous scatological and sexual references and a drug reference. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III—adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13—parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.
______________________________
John P. McCarthy is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.


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Giles: Despite the fact that much about St. Giles is shrouded in mystery, we can say that he was one of the most popular saints in the Middle Ages. Likely, he was born in the first half of the seventh century in southeastern France. That is where he built a monastery that became a popular stopping-off point for pilgrims making their way to Compostela in Spain and the Holy Land.<br /><br />In England, many ancient churches and hospitals were dedicated to Giles. One of the sections of the city of Brussels is named after him. In Germany, Giles was included among the so-called 14 Holy Helpers, a popular group of saints to whom people prayed, especially for recovery from disease and for strength at the hour of death. Also among the 14 were Sts. Christopher, Barbara and Blaise. Interestingly, Giles was the only non-martyr among them. Devotion to the "Holy Helpers" was especially strong in parts of Germany and in Hungary and Sweden. Such devotion made his popularity spread. Giles was soon invoked as the patron of the poor and the disabled.<br /><br />The pilgrimage center that once drew so many fell into disrepair some centuries after Giles' death. American Catholic Blog The ascension is about the final reunion of what appeared to be separated for a while: earth and heaven, human and divine, matter and Spirit. If the Christ is the archetype of the full human journey, now we know how it all resolves itself in the end. “So that where I am, you also will be” (John 14:3).

 
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