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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Morning Glory

By
John P. McCarthy
Source: Catholic News Service


Rachel McAdams, Diane Keaton and Harrison Ford star in "Morning Glory."
It's no surprise that the newsroom comedy "Morning Glory" (Paramount) brings to mind the classic sitcom "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" and the 1987 feature film "Broadcast News." Both were created by James L. Brooks, who wasn't involved in this project but whose influence is keenly felt.

While "Morning Glory" lacks the sharp wit of "Broadcast News," the modest success of this screwball, working-girl comedy can be attributed to the portrayal of the central character, Becky Fuller, by Canadian actress Rachel McAdams. Miss Fuller sparkles as a worthy big-screen successor to that iconic Twin Cities' newswoman, Ms. Mary Richards.

After being fired for budgetary reasons from a local morning show in New Jersey, 28-year-old Becky lands a job in Manhattan as the executive producer of "Daybreak," the struggling morning offering of a national network.

Preternaturally vivacious and enthusiastic, Becky is extremely capable, despite coming across as slightly ditzy. Tasked with reviving the under-budgeted, perpetually ridiculed program, she arranges for venerable reporter Mike Pomeroy (Harrison Ford) to assume co-anchor duties alongside Colleen Peck (Diane Keaton).

Thanks to McAdams, who has received strong notices for her work in movies such as "Mean Girls" and "The Notebook," "Morning Glory" has an appealing glow without ever achieving comedic glory.

With Ford and Keaton tending to growl and grimace without much conviction, there's significant pressure on McAdams to carry the film, just as there is on Becky to salvage "Daybreak." The key is that she never makes Becky's verve seem like "repellant moxie," despite Mike's initially harsh assessment to that effect.

Becky's optimism and can-do spirit is the most salubrious aspect of "Morning Glory." Her adeptness at playing hardball with colleagues when necessary proves she's no Pollyanna, however; likewise her morally unacceptable decision to sleep with fellow producer Adam Bennett (Patrick Wilson).

Unfortunately, Aline Brosh McKenna's script ultimately sides with fluff over substance given that Becky's mission becomes persuading dinosaur Mike to relax his standards. Unfortunately, her philosophy that "no story is too high or too low to reach for" is borne out as the movie gently mocks then ultimately celebrates the public's assumed preference for light fare over hard news.

In addition to leaning on the talents of his versatile star, director Robert Michell ("Notting Hill") lets music and montages do most of the storytelling. The dialogue is sprinkled throughout with ribald remarks that—along with that unseen coupling—make "Morning Glory" acceptable only for mature audiences.

The film contains nongraphic sexual activity, an off-screen encounter, several uses of profanity, two instances of rough language, much crude and crass talk, numerous scatological and sexual references and a drug reference. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III—adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13—parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.
______________________________
John P. McCarthy is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.


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Stephen of Mar Saba: A "do not disturb" sign helped today's saint find holiness and peace. 
<p>Stephen of Mar Saba was the nephew of St. John Damascene, who introduced the young boy to monastic life beginning at age 10. When he reached 24, Stephen served the community in a variety of ways, including guest master. After some time he asked permission to live a hermit's life. The answer from the abbot was yes and no: Stephen could follow his preferred lifestyle during the week, but on weekends he was to offer his skills as a counselor. Stephen placed a note on the door of his cell: "Forgive me, Fathers, in the name of the Lord, but please do not disturb me except on Saturdays and Sundays." </p><p>Despite his calling to prayer and quiet, Stephen displayed uncanny skills with people and was a valued spiritual guide. </p><p>His biographer and disciple wrote about Stephen: "Whatever help, spiritual or material, he was asked to give, he gave. He received and honored all with the same kindness. He possessed nothing and lacked nothing. In total poverty he possessed all things." </p><p>Stephen died in 794.</p> American Catholic Blog Father, grant us the grace to be humble and content to place ourselves at your service. You know the role you want us to play in your kingdom. Following where you lead is the only sure way to find success and enjoy the adventure. We ask your grace to know this, in Jesus's name, Amen.


 
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