AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

My Soul to Take 3-D

By
John P. McCarthy
Source: Catholic News Service

Wes Craven, the horror auteur best known for unleashing Freddy Krueger in 1984's "A Nightmare on Elm Street," is back at it with another, much less memorable bogeyman. There's little chance the slasher behind the mayhem in "My Soul to Take 3-D" (Universal) will enter the horror movie pantheon, let alone secure a place in pop culture lore.

Taking an 18th-century children's prayer as his jumping-off point, writer-director Craven offers a cheaply effective diversion. Unlike others working in the genre today, he doesn't rely on stomach-churning gore or sadistic torture to frighten audiences; he knows how to make viewers jump the old-fashioned way. That's probably the best that can be said about this picture, however, since there's enough bloody violence and other unsavory material to render it inappropriate.

In the hamlet of Riverton, Mass., someone begins stalking seven teenagers who were born the night a serial killer known as the Riverton Ripper supposedly died. Everyone in town is obsessed with this homegrown criminal, a husband and father named Abel Plenkov (Raul Esparza), who suffered from multiple personality disorder and even murdered his pregnant wife.

The day after a ritual bonfire commemorating Plenkov's spree, the targeted youths spend tense hours at school on their 16th birthdays. Is the Ripper still alive or did he find a way to endure inside someone else—by possessing their soul, perhaps? The most likely vessel is a tremulous kid nicknamed Bug (Max Thieriot) whose best friend, Alex (John Magaro), also came into the world on that fateful night. The two are bullied by the cool clique, which happens to include two peers—the "jock" and the "pretty girl"—who share their birthday.

No matter how much Craven tries to ornament the action with talk of soul-eating and bad seeds versus good seeds, it boils down to people confined to a house trying to avoid being butchered. He goes out of his way to mock religious faith, in particular any ability it may have to shield believers from harm. Penelope (Zena Grey), one of the seven marked teens, is a fanatical Christian who believes in the power of prayer. Needless to say, her 16th birthday is her last.

"My Soul to Take" isn't boring, but it's far from original or, pardon the bad pun, cutting-edge. There is absolutely no justification for exhibiting it in 3-D and asking moviegoers to spend extra for virtually nonexistent visual effects.

Craven knows how to craft suspense and spook audiences using low-tech means. That doesn't mean he should or that anyone need take notice of the instantly disposable result.

The film contains numerous acts of bloody violence, including a suicide and multiple stabbings and slashings; pervasive rough language and profanity; disrespectful attitudes toward religion and prayer; and a number of sexual references and banter involving teenagers. The Catholic News Service classification is O—morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R—restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

*****
John P. McCarthy is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.


Search reviews at CatholicMovieReviews.org


Thank you for your comments. Editors will review all posts before they are visible on the website.

blog comments powered by Disqus







Ansgar: The “apostle of the north” (Scandinavia) had enough frustrations to become a saint—and he did. He became a Benedictine at Corbie, France, where he had been educated. Three years later, when the king of Denmark became a convert, Ansgar went to that country for three years of missionary work, without noticeable success. Sweden asked for Christian missionaries, and he went there, suffering capture by pirates and other hardships on the way. Fewer than two years later, he was recalled, to become abbot of New Corbie (Corvey) and bishop of Hamburg. The pope made him legate for the Scandinavian missions. Funds for the northern apostolate stopped with Emperor Louis’s death. After 13 years’ work in Hamburg, Ansgar saw it burned to the ground by invading Northmen; Sweden and Denmark returned to paganism. 
<p>He directed new apostolic activities in the North, traveling to Denmark and being instrumental in the conversion of another king. By the strange device of casting lots, the king of Sweden allowed the Christian missionaries to return. </p><p>Ansgar’s biographers remark that he was an extraordinary preacher, a humble and ascetical priest. He was devoted to the poor and the sick, imitating the Lord in washing their feet and waiting on them at table. He died peacefully at Bremen, Germany, without achieving his wish to be a martyr. </p><p>Sweden became pagan again after his death, and remained so until the coming of missionaries two centuries later.</p> American Catholic Blog Every vocation is a vocation to sacrifice and to joy. It is a call to the knowledge of God, to the recognition of God as our Father, to joy in the understanding of His mercy.

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
The Wisdom of Merton
Explore Merton's wisdom distilled from his books and journals.
It's the Centennial of Thomas Merton's birth
Listen to a best-loved book by one of the greatest spiritual writers of our time!
Who Inspired Thomas Merton?

Discover the Franciscan traces in Merton's work and learn new ways of living in harmony with God, creation, and others.

New for Lent 2015
This Lent, detach yourself from the busyness of everyday life and find stillness and silence.
Discover the Princess Within
The Princess Guide uses fairy tales to inspire young women to dignity, femininity, and fervent faith.

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Year for Consecrated Life
Remember the contributions of religious priests, brothers, and sisters in a special way throughout this year.
St. John Bosco
As an educator, this saint is one of the patrons of Catholic schools and students.
Peace
End this month as you began the year. Share peaceful thoughts with friends and family.
Catholic Schools Week
Through the Catholic school system, parents know that their children are being formed as well as informed.
Sacrament of Marriage
In imitation of Christ, the vocation to marriage can create a relationship for healing and forgiveness.



Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2015