AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Secretariat

By
Joseph McAleer
Source: Catholic News Service


Diane Lane stars in "Secretariat."
Not many Hollywood films open by quoting the Book of Job on the grandeur of horses: "In frenzied excitement he eats up the ground; he paws fiercely, rejoicing in his strength, and charges into the fray, afraid of nothing, when the trumpet sounds." (Job 39: 21-24, New International Version).

But then, not many films are as exceptional as "Secretariat" (Disney), an exuberant and inspirational retelling of the real-life story of—arguably—the greatest racehorse of all time.

"Secretariat" is more than just a rousing sports movie. Much like "Seabiscuit," "Secretariat" explores the human dynamics surrounding the animal, extolling the importance of family and the virtues of perseverance and courage. Viewers of faith, moreover, will appreciate a strong undercurrent of religious fervor.

There's quite a saga behind the 1973 Triple Crown winner. Diane Lane plays Penny Tweedy, the nonequine lead. When her mother dies, and her father, Christopher (Scott Glenn), a prominent breeder, becomes incapacitated, Penny returns to her roots on a Virginia horse farm. Though proud and happy as a housewife, Penny rises to the defense of the failing business and assumes control.

Blessed events are about to happen to the stable's two mares, sired by the famous stallion Bold Ruler, owned by Ogden Phipps (James Cromwell). Ogden and Christopher had agreed to a coin toss to decide ownership of the offspring, and Penny upholds the plan. Ogden wins the toss, and chooses what he thinks will prove the better racehorse. Penny disagrees, and the rest, as they say, is history.

There's something special about Secretariat right from the start. Gentle-hearted groom Eddie Sweat (Nelsan Ellis) marvels when the foal jumps, moments after being born: "Have you ever seen that, a colt stand up so fast on his feet?"

But the road to racing success is a rocky one. Large and chestnut-colored, "Big Red" (Secretariat's first name) is fat and lazy and branded the underdog. "He eats too much, sleeps too much, and lays against the back of the starting gate like he's in the Caribbean," laments his hard-driving trainer, Lucien Laurin (John Malkovich).

After Penny's father dies, the taxman cometh, and Penny is pressured by her brother and husband to sell the farm and the horses. She is determined to see through her father's dream, juggling family commitments while battling sexism in the male-dominated horse world. At her side is her father's indomitable assistant, Miss Ham (Margo Martindale), who rechristens Big Red "Secretariat" after her first choice, "Deo Volente" ("God Willing"), is turned down.

Nobody messes with this dynamic duo, and Penny earns a reputation for being "tough as nails." Against all odds, Secretariat emerges as a winner, and Penny's success inspires others, especially her family.

"Secretariat" barrels towards the Triple Crown as its climax. These are re-created with skill, with the viewer plunged right into the middle of the action, dirt flying and horses heaving as the soundtrack soars with Negro spirituals.

Directed by Randall Wallace (who wrote the screenplay for the 1995 blockbuster "Braveheart"), "Secretariat" is at once a thrilling sports movie and a moving family drama. Unencumbered by any really objectionable elements, this cinematic champ can be cheered on by a wide audience.

The film contains some tense emotional moments and heated arguments. The Catholic News Service classification is A-II—adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG—parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.

*****
Joseph McAleer is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.


Search reviews at CatholicMovieReviews.org


Thank you for your comments. Editors will review all posts before they are visible on the website.

blog comments powered by Disqus







Peter Canisius: The energetic life of Peter Canisius should demolish any stereotypes we may have of the life of a saint as dull or routine. Peter lived his 76 years at a pace which must be considered heroic, even in our time of rapid change. A man blessed with many talents, Peter is an excellent example of the scriptural man who develops his talents for the sake of the Lord’s work. 
<p>He was one of the most important figures in the Catholic Reformation in Germany. His was such a key role that he has often been called the “second apostle of Germany” in that his life parallels the earlier work of Boniface (June 5). </p><p>Although Peter once accused himself of idleness in his youth, he could not have been idle too long, for at the age of 19 he received a master’s degree from the university at Cologne. Soon afterwards he met Peter Faber, the first disciple of Ignatius Loyola (July 31), who influenced Peter so much that he joined the recently formed Society of Jesus. </p><p>At this early age Peter had already taken up a practice he continued throughout his life—a process of study, reflection, prayer and writing. After his ordination in 1546, he became widely known for his editions of the writings of St. Cyril of Alexandria and St. Leo the Great. Besides this reflective literary bent, Peter had a zeal for the apostolate. He could often be found visiting the sick or prisoners, even when his assigned duties in other areas were more than enough to keep most people fully occupied. </p><p>In 1547 Peter attended several sessions of the Council of Trent, whose decrees he was later assigned to implement. After a brief teaching assignment at the Jesuit college at Messina, Peter was entrusted with the mission to Germany—from that point on his life’s work. He taught in several universities and was instrumental in establishing many colleges and seminaries. He wrote a catechism that explained the Catholic faith in a way which common people could understand—a great need of that age. </p><p>Renowned as a popular preacher, Peter packed churches with those eager to hear his eloquent proclamation of the gospel. He had great diplomatic ability, often serving as a reconciler between disputing factions. In his letters (filling eight volumes) one finds words of wisdom and counsel to people in all walks of life. At times he wrote unprecedented letters of criticism to leaders of the Church—yet always in the context of a loving, sympathetic concern. </p><p>At 70 Peter suffered a paralytic seizure, but he continued to preach and write with the aid of a secretary until his death in his hometown (Nijmegen, Netherlands) on December 21, 1597.</p> American Catholic Blog While we await the full and unending experience of God drawing near to us, we must continue to work in the vineyard. We must continue to make God’s love real in every condition and circumstance of our lives.

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
Sisterhood of Saints
Enjoy a daily dose of guidance and inspiration from widely known female saints such as Sts. Monica, Teresa of Avila, Thérèse of Lisieux, Joan, and Bernadette.
New from Richard Rohr
"This Franciscan message is sorely needed in the world...." —Publishers Weekly
Who Inspired Thomas Merton?
Learn new ways of living in harmony with God, creation, and others, courtesy of St. Francis and Thomas Merton.
A New Daily Devotional for 2015
"A practical and appealing daily guide to the Poor Man of Assisi." —Margaret Carney, O.S.F., president, St. Bonaventure University
Celebrate the Centenary of Thomas Merton's birth
One of Merton's most enduring and popular works, now in audio!

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Fourth Sunday of Advent - "O Antiphons"
"Come, O Radiant Dawn" Before dinner this evening gather your family around the Advent wreath and light all four candles.
Fourth Sunday of Advent - "O Antiphons"
“Come, O Key of David” Before dinner this evening gather your family around the Advent wreath and light all four candles.
Advent - "O Antiphons"
“Come, O Root of Jesse” Christmas is less than a week away! Take time now to schedule e-cards for a later delivery.
Advent - "O Antiphons"
“Come, O Lord” Send an e-card to celebrate the third week of Advent.
Advent - "O Antiphons"
“Come, O Wisdom” The liturgical countdown to Christmas begins today.



Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2014