AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service

With a magnetic performance by Michael Douglas—reprising his role as iconic, scruples-free wheeler-dealer Gordon Gekko—offset by heavy-handed attempts at social commentary and a central romantic relationship that puts the sexual cart before the marital horse, the high stakes drama "Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps" (Fox) makes for an uneven sequel.

Yet, throughout a somewhat over-lengthy series of plot twists, director Oliver Stone's follow-up to his 1987 hit "Wall Street" consistently affirms anti-materialist, broadly pro-family and even—implicitly at least—pro-life values that viewers of faith will find congenial.

Screenwriters Allan Loeb and Stephen Schiff pick up the story with the disgraced Gekko's 2001 release from prison. Having done his time for securities fraud, the ex-big shot finds no one, and nothing, waiting for him on the outside.

Jump forward seven years and Gekko has become a successful author and an accurate prophet of impending collapse whose best-seller's title asks, in a play on his famous mantra from the first film, "Is Greed Good?"

Joining the audience for one of Gekko's publicity appearance—at New York's Jesuit-run Fordham University—is current financial high flyer Jake Moore (Shia LaBeouf). Jake's interest in Gekko is personal as well as professional since he has been living with, and has just become engaged to, Gekko's estranged daughter, Winnie (Carey Mulligan).

Gekko is anxious to reconcile with Winnie, who blames him for her drug-addicted brother's death from an overdose. He finds a willing partner in Jake, and the two make a deal: Jake will work to soften Winnie's feelings toward Dad, and Gekko will assist Jake in his business vendetta against ruthless mogul Bretton James (Josh Brolin).

As partially revealed in earlier scenes, Bretton's stealthy machinations led to the ruin both of Jake's firm and of its founder—also Jake's beloved mentor—Louis Zabel (Frank Langella).

Jake sincerely believes that Winnie will benefit from her father's renewed presence in her life and, lacking Louis' support, he is himself in search of a paternal figure to whom he can turn for guidance. But he gets more than he bargained for out of his arrangement with Gekko, realizing too late that Gekko's plaintive identification of Winnie as "all I have left" has more than one meaning.

Perhaps even more so than in the first installment, Douglas' Gekko is a fascinating compound of charisma, corruption and a few remaining shards of human decency. While his plea that the hi-jinks of Bretton and his ilk—supposedly modeled on real life excesses—are far worse than anything he ever attempted may be blatantly self-serving, a variety of developments demonstrate that Gekko's time behind bars has brought about at least a partial conversion.

This second "Wall Street" succeeds best when it maintains that kind of sharp focus on the personal, but feels bloated and ineffective when it pans out to make sweeping indictments of complex patterns of economic behavior that, however disastrous their consequences, defy easy analysis.

The film contains cohabitation, brief sexual imagery and occasional sexual references, several uses of profanity, at least two instances of rough language and a few crude and some crass terms. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III—adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13—parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

*****
John Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.



Search reviews at CatholicMovieReviews.org


Thank you for your comments. Editors will review all posts before they are visible on the website.

blog comments powered by Disqus







Mary Magdalene de' Pazzi: Mystical ecstasy is the elevation of the spirit to God in such a way that the person is aware of this union with God while both internal and external senses are detached from the sensible world. Mary Magdalene de' Pazzi was so generously given this special gift of God that she is called the "ecstatic saint." 
<p>She was born into a noble family in Florence in 1566. The normal course would have been for Catherine de' Pazzi to have married wealth and enjoyed comfort, but she chose to follow her own path. At nine she learned to meditate from the family confessor. She made her first Communion at the then-early age of 10 and made a vow of virginity one month later. When 16, she entered the Carmelite convent in Florence because she could receive Communion daily there. </p><p>Catherine had taken the name Mary Magdalene and had been a novice for a year when she became critically ill. Death seemed near so her superiors let her make her profession of vows from a cot in the chapel in a private ceremony. Immediately after, she fell into an ecstasy that lasted about two hours. This was repeated after Communion on the following 40 mornings. These ecstasies were rich experiences of union with God and contained marvelous insights into divine truths. </p><p>As a safeguard against deception and to preserve the revelations, her confessor asked Mary Magdalene to dictate her experiences to sister secretaries. Over the next six years, five large volumes were filled. The first three books record ecstasies from May of 1584 through Pentecost week the following year. This week was a preparation for a severe five-year trial. The fourth book records that trial and the fifth is a collection of letters concerning reform and renewal. Another book, <i>Admonitions</i>, is a collection of her sayings arising from her experiences in the formation of women religious. </p><p>The extraordinary was ordinary for this saint. She read the thoughts of others and predicted future events. During her lifetime, she appeared to several persons in distant places and cured a number of sick people. </p><p>It would be easy to dwell on the ecstasies and pretend that Mary Magdalene only had spiritual highs. This is far from true. It seems that God permitted her this special closeness to prepare her for the five years of desolation that followed when she experienced spiritual dryness. She was plunged into a state of darkness in which she saw nothing but what was horrible in herself and all around her. She had violent temptations and endured great physical suffering. She died in 1607 at 41, and was canonized in 1669.</p> American Catholic Blog Let us never tire, therefore, of seeking the Lord—of letting ourselves be sought by him—of tending over our relationship with him in silence and prayerful listening. Let us keep our gaze fixed on him, the center of time and history; let us make room for his presence within us.

The Gospel of John the Gospel of Relationship

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Pentecost
As Church we rely on the Holy Spirit to form us in the image of Christ.

Graduation
Let a special graduate know how proud you are of their accomplishment.

Friendship
Catholic Greetings e-cards help you connect with long-distance friends.

Reception into Full Communion
Participate in welcoming those completing their Christian initiation, and recall your own commitment to the faith.

Ordination Anniversary
Use Catholic Greetings to acknowledge your pastor’s ordination or pastoral anniversary.




Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2015