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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

You Again

By
Joseph McAleer
Source: Catholic News Service

The phrase "best friends forever" (BFF) takes on a whole new meaning in "You Again" (Disney/Touchstone), an entertaining, multigenerational comedy in which grown-ups find it hard to leave the dramas—and traumas—of their teen years behind.

Amid the resurgence of teen angst and unresolved conflicts, the film offers refreshingly positive messages about the importance of family, forgiveness, and reconciliation.

Twenty-something Marni (Kristen Bell) seemingly has it all: looks, confidence, and a dream job. But appearances are deceiving; Marni flies home for the wedding of her brother, Will (Jimmy Wolk), only to discover that he is marrying Joanna (Odette Yustman), the girl who constantly terrorized her in high school.

In flashbacks, we learn that Marni was a "Class 1 Geek," and that Joanna was the self-proclaimed warden of the "prison" she called grades 9-12. Marni relives the ridicule she thought she had left far behind. "High school was a horror movie," she says. "This wedding weekend is the sequel."

Eight years have passed since graduation, and Joanna is now a respected nurse and pillar of the community as well as a beloved future member of Marni's family. Joanna claims not to remember Marni, but Marni is not convinced. She sets out to prove that people do not change. "Who you are in high school determines who you are for the rest of your life," Marni intones.

It seems no one can escape high school, not even the older generation. Marni's mother, Gail (Jamie Lee Curtis), discovers that Joanna's aunt, Ramona (Sigourney Weaver), is her student-era best friend-turned-rival whom she hasn't seen in decades. Though content in her role as family matriarch, Gail grows to resent the twice-divorced hotel heiress Ramona.

Both actresses enjoy hamming it up with sparring matches that recall scenes on the primetime TV dramas "Dynasty" and "Dallas"—a parallel reinforced when their shared high school sweetheart, Richie (none other than Patrick Duffy), turns up.

Then there's Grandma Bunny, played by the ubiquitous Betty White, who has issues of her own. In addition to flirting with every younger man in sight, Grandma needs help putting in her dentures, an incident that provides one of the film's gross-out moments.

Beyond the catfights, dance competitions, cheerleading demonstrations, karaoke and wedding planning, "You Again" takes time to offer solid advice on forgiveness. "Everyone deserves a second chance," Gail tells Marni, urging her to accept the past and move on. "We are our experiences. They made you into the woman you are today."

Though directed with a light touch by Andy Fickman ("Race to Witch Mountain"), so much is going on in "You Again"—what with dishes being hurled through the air and characters falling into swimming pools—that viewers may sympathize with Gail's husband, Mark (Victor Garber), who throws up his hands and exclaims, "I've not the slightest clue how things work in the girl world."

The film contains mild slapstick violence and some double-entendres. The Catholic News Service classification is A-II—adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG—parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.

*****
McAleer is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.


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Gregory the Great: Coming events cast their shadows before: Gregory was the prefect of Rome before he was 30. After five years in office he resigned, founded six monasteries on his Sicilian estate and became a Benedictine monk in his own home at Rome. 
<p>Ordained a priest, he became one of the pope's seven deacons, and also served six years in the East as papal representative in Constantinople. He was recalled to become abbot, and at the age of 50 was elected pope by the clergy and people of Rome. </p><p>He was direct and firm. He removed unworthy priests from office, forbade taking money for many services, emptied the papal treasury to ransom prisoners of the Lombards and to care for persecuted Jews and the victims of plague and famine. He was very concerned about the conversion of England, sending 40 monks from his own monastery. He is known for his reform of the liturgy, for strengthening respect for doctrine. Whether he was largely responsible for the revision of "Gregorian" chant is disputed. </p><p>Gregory lived in a time of perpetual strife with invading Lombards and difficult relations with the East. When Rome itself was under attack, he interviewed the Lombard king. </p><p>An Anglican historian has written: "It is impossible to conceive what would have been the confusion, the lawlessness, the chaotic state of the Middle Ages without the medieval papacy; and of the medieval papacy, the real father is Gregory the Great." </p><p>His book, <i>Pastoral Care</i>, on the duties and qualities of a bishop, was read for centuries after his death. He described bishops mainly as physicians whose main duties were preaching and the enforcement of discipline. In his own down-to-earth preaching, Gregory was skilled at applying the daily gospel to the needs of his listeners. Called "the Great," Gregory has been given a place with Augustine (August 28), Ambrose (December 7) and Jerome (September 30)as one of the four key doctors of the Western Church.</p> American Catholic Blog The pierced, open side of Christ on the cross, which makes visible the Sacred Heart of the Son of God, remains “the way in” to knowledge of Jesus Christ.

 
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