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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service


Soren, voiced by Jim Sturgess, from the animated film "Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole."
The visually engaging 3D animated adventure "Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole" (Warner Bros.) offers family audiences a sound, if not overly original, narrative of downtrodden right versus overweening might. But intense scenes of animal combat preclude endorsement for the very youngest of this otherwise unobjectionable tale.

Director Zack Snyder's somewhat bulky adaptation of the first three novels in Kathryn Lasky's popular "Guardians of Ga'Hoole" series of children's books centers on plucky owlet Soren (voice of Jim Sturgess).

Raised on bedtime stories about a legendary band of heroic warrior owls known as the Guardians, young dreamer Soren—who aspires to follow in the Guardians' footsteps—finds his courage put to the test when he and his brother, Kludd (voice of Ryan Kwanten), fall from their nest while learning to fly and are kidnapped.

Transported to the dark lair of a force of militaristic owls who call themselves the Pure Ones, Soren is consigned to slavery by their scheming sovereign, Queen Nyra (voice of Helen Mirren). But the cynical Kludd—who resolutely denies the existence of the Guardians—turns collaborator and is assigned to military training as one of Nyra's minions.

Soren befriends and protects diminutive fellow captive Gylfie (voice of Emily Barclay) and, with the help of a sympathetic guard, the pair escapes. They embark on a trying quest to enlist the help of the Guardians—who prove to be real after all—to defeat Nyra's malicious plans for using secret technology to dominate all other owls.

Along with story elements that evoke traditional tales of chivalry—including Soren's eventual squire-like apprenticeship with knightly Ezylryb (voice of Geoffrey Rush), a veteran Guardian—there are also strong echoes of the ideological struggle underlying World War II.

Thus the Pure Ones, who worship power and brute force, spout rhetoric about the superiority of their subspecies that recalls the Nazis' malignant racial theories. Under the leadership of the Churchillian Ezylryb and his cautious fellow commander, Allomere (voice of Sam Neill), by contrast, the Guardians—whose motto is "mend the broken, make strong the weak and vanquish evil"—resort to force only with reluctance and in the cause of justice.

While a series of harsh, though far from graphic, airborne duels between owls armed with razor-sharp metal talons reinforce this peace-loving message, they will likely scare small fry who may also be disturbed by the variety of dangers to which Soren is subjected.

As for adult Catholics, they may be left pondering the fact that Nyra's nightmarish realm is called the "St. Aegolius Academy for Orphaned Owls." Is this meant to be a jibe at totalitarian doublespeak or a swipe at church-run institutions? As penned by John Orloff and Emil Stern, the script gives no definitive hint.

Passing references to an owl deity named Glaux are equally vague. Is this simply the owl name for God or are the nocturnal birds on to something we humans have missed?

"Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole" will be shown on both Imax and conventional screens.

The film contains strong, though stylized, violence and situations of peril. The Catholic News Service classification is A-II—adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG—parental guidance suggested.

*****
John Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.


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Sharbel Makhluf: Although this saint never traveled far from the Lebanese village of Beka-Kafra, where he was born, his influence has spread widely. 
<p>Joseph Zaroun Makluf was raised by an uncle because his father, a mule driver, died when Joseph was only three. At the age of 23, Joseph joined the Monastery of St. Maron at Annaya, Lebanon, and took the name Sharbel in honor of a second-century martyr. He professed his final vows in 1853 and was ordained six years later. </p><p>Following the example of the fifth-century St. Maron, Sharbel lived as a hermit from 1875 until his death. His reputation for holiness prompted people to seek him to receive a blessing and to be remembered in his prayers. He followed a strict fast and was very devoted to the Blessed Sacrament. When his superiors occasionally asked him to administer the sacraments to nearby villages, Sharbel did so gladly. </p><p>He died in the late afternoon on Christmas Eve. Christians and non-Christians soon made his tomb a place of pilgrimage and of cures. Pope Paul VI beatified him in 1965 and canonized him 12 years later.</p> American Catholic Blog You cannot claim to be ‘for Christ’ and espouse a political cause that implies callous indifference to the needs of millions of human beings and even cooperate in their destruction.

 
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