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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service


Soren, voiced by Jim Sturgess, from the animated film "Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole."
The visually engaging 3D animated adventure "Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole" (Warner Bros.) offers family audiences a sound, if not overly original, narrative of downtrodden right versus overweening might. But intense scenes of animal combat preclude endorsement for the very youngest of this otherwise unobjectionable tale.

Director Zack Snyder's somewhat bulky adaptation of the first three novels in Kathryn Lasky's popular "Guardians of Ga'Hoole" series of children's books centers on plucky owlet Soren (voice of Jim Sturgess).

Raised on bedtime stories about a legendary band of heroic warrior owls known as the Guardians, young dreamer Soren—who aspires to follow in the Guardians' footsteps—finds his courage put to the test when he and his brother, Kludd (voice of Ryan Kwanten), fall from their nest while learning to fly and are kidnapped.

Transported to the dark lair of a force of militaristic owls who call themselves the Pure Ones, Soren is consigned to slavery by their scheming sovereign, Queen Nyra (voice of Helen Mirren). But the cynical Kludd—who resolutely denies the existence of the Guardians—turns collaborator and is assigned to military training as one of Nyra's minions.

Soren befriends and protects diminutive fellow captive Gylfie (voice of Emily Barclay) and, with the help of a sympathetic guard, the pair escapes. They embark on a trying quest to enlist the help of the Guardians—who prove to be real after all—to defeat Nyra's malicious plans for using secret technology to dominate all other owls.

Along with story elements that evoke traditional tales of chivalry—including Soren's eventual squire-like apprenticeship with knightly Ezylryb (voice of Geoffrey Rush), a veteran Guardian—there are also strong echoes of the ideological struggle underlying World War II.

Thus the Pure Ones, who worship power and brute force, spout rhetoric about the superiority of their subspecies that recalls the Nazis' malignant racial theories. Under the leadership of the Churchillian Ezylryb and his cautious fellow commander, Allomere (voice of Sam Neill), by contrast, the Guardians—whose motto is "mend the broken, make strong the weak and vanquish evil"—resort to force only with reluctance and in the cause of justice.

While a series of harsh, though far from graphic, airborne duels between owls armed with razor-sharp metal talons reinforce this peace-loving message, they will likely scare small fry who may also be disturbed by the variety of dangers to which Soren is subjected.

As for adult Catholics, they may be left pondering the fact that Nyra's nightmarish realm is called the "St. Aegolius Academy for Orphaned Owls." Is this meant to be a jibe at totalitarian doublespeak or a swipe at church-run institutions? As penned by John Orloff and Emil Stern, the script gives no definitive hint.

Passing references to an owl deity named Glaux are equally vague. Is this simply the owl name for God or are the nocturnal birds on to something we humans have missed?

"Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole" will be shown on both Imax and conventional screens.

The film contains strong, though stylized, violence and situations of peril. The Catholic News Service classification is A-II—adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG—parental guidance suggested.

*****
John Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.


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John of Capistrano: It has been said the Christian saints are the world’s greatest optimists. Not blind to the existence and consequences of evil, they base their confidence on the power of Christ’s redemption. The power of conversion through Christ extends not only to sinful people but also to calamitous events. 
<p>Imagine being born in the 14th century. One-third of the population and nearly 40 percent of the clergy were wiped out by the bubonic plague. The Western Schism split the Church with two or three claimants to the Holy See at one time. England and France were at war. The city-states of Italy were constantly in conflict. No wonder that gloom dominated the spirit of the culture and the times. </p><p>John Capistrano was born in 1386. His education was thorough. His talents and success were great. When he was 26 he was made governor of Perugia. Imprisoned after a battle against the Malatestas, he resolved to change his way of life completely. At the age of 30 he entered the Franciscan novitiate and was ordained a priest four years later. </p><p>His preaching attracted great throngs at a time of religious apathy and confusion. He and 12 Franciscan brethren were received in the countries of central Europe as angels of God. They were instrumental in reviving a dying faith and devotion. </p><p>The Franciscan Order itself was in turmoil over the interpretation and observance of the Rule of St. Francis. Through John’s tireless efforts and his expertise in law, the heretical Fraticelli were suppressed and the "Spirituals" were freed from interference in their stricter observance. </p><p>He helped bring about a reunion with the Greek and Armenian Churches, unfortunately only a brief arrangement. </p><p>When the Turks captured Constantinople in 1453, he was commissioned to preach a crusade for the defense of Europe. Gaining little response in Bavaria and Austria, he decided to concentrate his efforts in Hungary. He led the army to Belgrade. Under the great General John Hunyadi, they gained an overwhelming victory, and the siege of Belgrade was lifted. Worn out by his superhuman efforts, Capistrano was an easy prey to an infection after the battle. He died October 23, 1456.</p> American Catholic Blog When we are linked by the power of prayer, we as it were, hold each other’s hand as we walk side by side along a slippery path; and thus by the bounteous disposition of charity, it comes about that the harder each one leans on the other, the more firmly we are riveted together in brotherly love. —St. Gregory the Great

 
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