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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service


Soren, voiced by Jim Sturgess, from the animated film "Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole."
The visually engaging 3D animated adventure "Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole" (Warner Bros.) offers family audiences a sound, if not overly original, narrative of downtrodden right versus overweening might. But intense scenes of animal combat preclude endorsement for the very youngest of this otherwise unobjectionable tale.

Director Zack Snyder's somewhat bulky adaptation of the first three novels in Kathryn Lasky's popular "Guardians of Ga'Hoole" series of children's books centers on plucky owlet Soren (voice of Jim Sturgess).

Raised on bedtime stories about a legendary band of heroic warrior owls known as the Guardians, young dreamer Soren—who aspires to follow in the Guardians' footsteps—finds his courage put to the test when he and his brother, Kludd (voice of Ryan Kwanten), fall from their nest while learning to fly and are kidnapped.

Transported to the dark lair of a force of militaristic owls who call themselves the Pure Ones, Soren is consigned to slavery by their scheming sovereign, Queen Nyra (voice of Helen Mirren). But the cynical Kludd—who resolutely denies the existence of the Guardians—turns collaborator and is assigned to military training as one of Nyra's minions.

Soren befriends and protects diminutive fellow captive Gylfie (voice of Emily Barclay) and, with the help of a sympathetic guard, the pair escapes. They embark on a trying quest to enlist the help of the Guardians—who prove to be real after all—to defeat Nyra's malicious plans for using secret technology to dominate all other owls.

Along with story elements that evoke traditional tales of chivalry—including Soren's eventual squire-like apprenticeship with knightly Ezylryb (voice of Geoffrey Rush), a veteran Guardian—there are also strong echoes of the ideological struggle underlying World War II.

Thus the Pure Ones, who worship power and brute force, spout rhetoric about the superiority of their subspecies that recalls the Nazis' malignant racial theories. Under the leadership of the Churchillian Ezylryb and his cautious fellow commander, Allomere (voice of Sam Neill), by contrast, the Guardians—whose motto is "mend the broken, make strong the weak and vanquish evil"—resort to force only with reluctance and in the cause of justice.

While a series of harsh, though far from graphic, airborne duels between owls armed with razor-sharp metal talons reinforce this peace-loving message, they will likely scare small fry who may also be disturbed by the variety of dangers to which Soren is subjected.

As for adult Catholics, they may be left pondering the fact that Nyra's nightmarish realm is called the "St. Aegolius Academy for Orphaned Owls." Is this meant to be a jibe at totalitarian doublespeak or a swipe at church-run institutions? As penned by John Orloff and Emil Stern, the script gives no definitive hint.

Passing references to an owl deity named Glaux are equally vague. Is this simply the owl name for God or are the nocturnal birds on to something we humans have missed?

"Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole" will be shown on both Imax and conventional screens.

The film contains strong, though stylized, violence and situations of peril. The Catholic News Service classification is A-II—adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG—parental guidance suggested.

*****
John Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.


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Wolfgang of Regensburg: Wolfgang was born in Swabia, Germany, and was educated at a school located at the abbey of Reichenau. There he encountered Henry, a young noble who went on to become Archbishop of Trier. Meanwhile, Wolfgang remained in close contact with the archbishop, teaching in his cathedral school and supporting his efforts to reform the clergy. 
<p>At the death of the archbishop, Wolfgang chose to become a Benedictine monk and moved to an abbey in Einsiedeln, now part of Switzerland. Ordained a priest, he was appointed director of the monastery school there. Later he was sent to Hungary as a missionary, though his zeal and good will yielded limited results. </p><p>Emperor Otto II appointed him Bishop of Regensburg near Munich. He immediately initiated reform of the clergy and of religious life, preaching with vigor and effectiveness and always demonstrating special concern for the poor. He wore the habit of a monk and lived an austere life. </p><p>The draw to monastic life never left him, including the desire for a life of solitude. At one point he left his diocese so that he could devote himself to prayer, but his responsibilities as bishop called him back. </p><p>In 994 Wolfgang became ill while on a journey; he died in Puppingen near Linz, Austria. He was canonized in 1052. His feast day is celebrated widely in much of central Europe. </p> American Catholic Blog Keep your gaze always on our most beloved Jesus, asking him in the depths of his heart what he desires for you, and never deny him anything even if it means going strongly against the grain for you. –Blessed Maria Sagrario of St. Aloysius Gonzaga

 
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