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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Resident Evil: Afterlife

By
Kurt Jensen
Source: Catholic News Service


Boris Kodjoe and Milla Jovovich star in "Resident Evil: Afterlife."
Those pesky zombies, oh, my. They get themselves a virus manufactured by an evil corporation, and the next thing you know, the undead start mobbing around saying "Argh!" a lot, waving their arms and craving people as snacks.

That's the substance of "Resident Evil: Afterlife" (Screen Gems), the fourth entry in the gory franchise based on the video game. It has only 3-D to commend it this time around, which makes it moderately more interesting, if not less of a completely dull waste of time.

Writer-director Paul W.S. Anderson puts Milla Jovovich as Alice back into the black tights to fight off the zombies and rescue a small band of humans in post-apocalyptic Los Angeles. She teams up with lissome pal Claire Redfield (Ali Larter of TV's "Heroes") as they help the group of intrepid stereotypes—bossy Hollywood producer Bennett (Kim Coates), aspiring actress Jill (Sienna Guillory reprising the role) and so on.

Much of the film transpires inside the one building the zombies have trouble with—a former maximum-security prison in which the humans take refuge. Hey, what luck! There's a huge stash of automatic weapons! There's also a little red airplane that can travel amazing distances without the need to refuel!

All battles, of course, are in slow-motion. Most of the dialogue would have been improved greatly sped up.

The film contains fleeting rough, crude and profane language, flying knives, cartoonish gun violence and, this being in 3-D, abundant splattering zombie heads. The Catholic News Service classification is L—limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R—restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

*****
Kurt Jensen is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.




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Madeleine Sophie Barat: The legacy of Madeleine Sophie Barat can be found in the more than 100 schools operated by her Society of the Sacred Heart, institutions known for the quality of the education made available to the young. 
<p>Sophie herself received an extensive education, thanks to her brother, Louis, 11 years older and her godfather at Baptism. Himself a seminarian, he decided that his younger sister would likewise learn Latin, Greek, history, physics and mathematics—always without interruption and with a minimum of companionship. By age 15, she had received a thorough exposure to the Bible, the teachings of the Fathers of the Church and theology. Despite the oppressive regime Louis imposed, young Sophie thrived and developed a genuine love of learning. </p><p>Meanwhile, this was the time of the French Revolution and of the suppression of Christian schools. The education of the young, particularly young girls, was in a troubled state. At the same time, Sophie, who had concluded that she was called to the religious life, was persuaded to begin her life as a nun and as a teacher. She founded the Society of the Sacred Heart, which would focus on schools for the poor as well as boarding schools for young women of means; today, co-ed Sacred Heart schools can be found as well as schools exclusively for boys. </p><p>In 1826, her Society of the Sacred Heart received formal papal approval. By then she had served as superior at a number of convents. In 1865, she was stricken with paralysis; she died that year on the feast of the Ascension. </p><p>Madeleine Sophie Barat was canonized in 1925.</p> American Catholic Blog Where we spend eternity is 100 percent under our control. God’s Word makes our options very clear: we can cooperate with the grace that Christ merited for us on the cross, or we can reject it and keep to our own course.

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