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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Resident Evil: Afterlife

By
Kurt Jensen
Source: Catholic News Service


Boris Kodjoe and Milla Jovovich star in "Resident Evil: Afterlife."
Those pesky zombies, oh, my. They get themselves a virus manufactured by an evil corporation, and the next thing you know, the undead start mobbing around saying "Argh!" a lot, waving their arms and craving people as snacks.

That's the substance of "Resident Evil: Afterlife" (Screen Gems), the fourth entry in the gory franchise based on the video game. It has only 3-D to commend it this time around, which makes it moderately more interesting, if not less of a completely dull waste of time.

Writer-director Paul W.S. Anderson puts Milla Jovovich as Alice back into the black tights to fight off the zombies and rescue a small band of humans in post-apocalyptic Los Angeles. She teams up with lissome pal Claire Redfield (Ali Larter of TV's "Heroes") as they help the group of intrepid stereotypes—bossy Hollywood producer Bennett (Kim Coates), aspiring actress Jill (Sienna Guillory reprising the role) and so on.

Much of the film transpires inside the one building the zombies have trouble with—a former maximum-security prison in which the humans take refuge. Hey, what luck! There's a huge stash of automatic weapons! There's also a little red airplane that can travel amazing distances without the need to refuel!

All battles, of course, are in slow-motion. Most of the dialogue would have been improved greatly sped up.

The film contains fleeting rough, crude and profane language, flying knives, cartoonish gun violence and, this being in 3-D, abundant splattering zombie heads. The Catholic News Service classification is L—limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R—restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

*****
Kurt Jensen is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.


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John Vianney: A man with vision overcomes obstacles and performs deeds that seem impossible. John Vianney was a man with vision: He wanted to become a priest. But he had to overcome his meager formal schooling, which inadequately prepared him for seminary studies. 
<p>His failure to comprehend Latin lectures forced him to discontinue. But his vision of being a priest urged him to seek private tutoring. After a lengthy battle with the books, John was ordained. </p><p>Situations calling for “impossible” deeds followed him everywhere. As pastor of the parish at Ars, John encountered people who were indifferent and quite comfortable with their style of living. His vision led him through severe fasts and short nights of sleep. (Some devils can only be cast out by prayer and fasting.) </p><p>With Catherine Lassagne and Benedicta Lardet, he established La Providence, a home for girls. Only a man of vision could have such trust that God would provide for the spiritual and material needs of all those who came to make La Providence their home. </p><p>His work as a confessor is John Vianney’s most remarkable accomplishment. In the winter months he was to spend 11 to 12 hours daily reconciling people with God. In the summer months this time was increased to 16 hours. Unless a man was dedicated to his vision of a priestly vocation, he could not have endured this giving of self day after day. </p><p>Many people look forward to retirement and taking it easy, doing the things they always wanted to do but never had the time. But John Vianney had no thoughts of retirement. As his fame spread, more hours were consumed in serving God’s people. Even the few hours he would allow himself for sleep were disturbed frequently by the devil. </p><p>Who, but a man with vision, could keep going with ever-increasing strength? In 1929, Pope Pius XI named him the patron of parish priests worldwide.</p> American Catholic Blog The most beautiful and spontaneous expressions of joy which I have seen during my life were by poor people who had little to hold on to. –Pope Francis

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