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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Resident Evil: Afterlife

By
Kurt Jensen
Source: Catholic News Service


Boris Kodjoe and Milla Jovovich star in "Resident Evil: Afterlife."
Those pesky zombies, oh, my. They get themselves a virus manufactured by an evil corporation, and the next thing you know, the undead start mobbing around saying "Argh!" a lot, waving their arms and craving people as snacks.

That's the substance of "Resident Evil: Afterlife" (Screen Gems), the fourth entry in the gory franchise based on the video game. It has only 3-D to commend it this time around, which makes it moderately more interesting, if not less of a completely dull waste of time.

Writer-director Paul W.S. Anderson puts Milla Jovovich as Alice back into the black tights to fight off the zombies and rescue a small band of humans in post-apocalyptic Los Angeles. She teams up with lissome pal Claire Redfield (Ali Larter of TV's "Heroes") as they help the group of intrepid stereotypes—bossy Hollywood producer Bennett (Kim Coates), aspiring actress Jill (Sienna Guillory reprising the role) and so on.

Much of the film transpires inside the one building the zombies have trouble with—a former maximum-security prison in which the humans take refuge. Hey, what luck! There's a huge stash of automatic weapons! There's also a little red airplane that can travel amazing distances without the need to refuel!

All battles, of course, are in slow-motion. Most of the dialogue would have been improved greatly sped up.

The film contains fleeting rough, crude and profane language, flying knives, cartoonish gun violence and, this being in 3-D, abundant splattering zombie heads. The Catholic News Service classification is L—limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R—restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

*****
Kurt Jensen is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.


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<p>When nobles in Hungary became dissatisfied with their king, they prevailed upon Casimir’s father, the king of Poland, to send his son to take over the country. Casimir obeyed his father, as many young men over the centuries have obeyed their government. The army he was supposed to lead was clearly outnumbered by the “enemy”; some of his troops were deserting because they were not paid. At the advice of his officers, Casimir decided to return home. </p><p>His father was irked at the failure of his plans, and confined his 15-year-old son for three months. The lad made up his mind never again to become involved in the wars of his day, and no amount of persuasion could change his mind. He returned to prayer and study, maintaining his decision to remain celibate even under pressure to marry the emperor’s daughter. </p><p>He reigned briefly as king of Poland during his father’s absence. He died of lung trouble at 23 while visiting Lithuania, of which he was also Grand Duke. He was buried in Vilnius, Lithuania.</p> American Catholic Blog We renew and deepen our dedication to God and express that by sacrificing something meaningful to us. But as we go about our fasting and almsgiving, let’s not forget to give him some extra time in prayer.


 
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