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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Machete

By
John P. McCarthy
Source: Catholic News Service

Considering that the Arizona Legislature has recently brought the issue of illegal immigration to the fore, the arrival of the ultraviolent "Machete" (Fox), about a Mexican vigilante handy with sharp objects, is nothing if not timely.

In keeping with the grimy exploitation flicks of the 1970s he so admires, writer-director-producer Robert Rodriguez goes out of his way to tickle and offend. But by championing the rights of undocumented workers and pushing Latino power more generally, Rodriguez gives his latest a thought-provoking veneer that can be recognized apart from its perversities and stylistic aplomb.

Make no mistake: Jocular splatter, not political satire, is the name of the game here and "Machete" is a blunt, lurid instrument. Its genesis was a fake trailer that appeared between the two films Rodriguez and Quentin Tarantino released as the double-bill "Grindhouse" in 2007. That talked-about teaser introduced the eponymous hero played by actor Danny Trejo, whose menacing visage will be instantly recognizable from scores of supporting film and television roles.

As fleshed out in this brutal scenario, Machete is an ex-Federale whose wife and daughter are murdered by the drug lord Torrez (Steven Seagal). Presumed dead, Machete bides his time for three years working as a day laborer in a Texas border town until, on the basis of his fearsome appearance, he's hired by crooked businessman Booth (Jeff Fahey) to kill a right-wing, anti-immigration state senator named John McLaughlin (Robert De Niro).

Unbeknownst to Machete and the conspirators who double-cross him, this assassination attempt will lead Machete to Torrez and help him empower the Mexican underclass at the same time.

Virtually impossible to sideline for more than a few frames, Machete fells opponents with an array of implements. We witness countless impalings, severed appendages, and decapitations, along with the requisite spurting of blood. In the movie's most disgusting, over-the-top scene, Machete fashions an escape rope out of a thug's intestines.

Viewers should be especially forewarned about Padre, a gun-toting Catholic priest played by Cheech Marin. Padre pays for desecrating his vows and violating numerous commandments by being nailed to a cross in the sanctuary of his church. As with most everything in this B-movie context, this torture sequence is difficult to take seriously, though that doesn't minimize the wince factor or its patent inappropriateness.

The same holds for the character of Booth's daughter April, played by Lindsay Lohan. A drug-addled wastrel, she has a liaison with Machete and her own mother, and then seeks revenge for her father's murder while wearing a nun's habit. Machete also gets cozy with a beautiful U.S. immigration agent named Sartana (Jessica Alba) and the militant Luz (Michelle Rodriguez), who runs a taco truck as a front for an underground network that supports Hispanic aliens.

Finally, no one watching "Machete" can fail to think about the real-life suffering caused by the drug trade and the migration of the desperate across the U.S.-Mexico border. Fortunately, in the real world, there are individuals and organizations that stand up for the less fortunate without employing Machete's immoral methods.

The film contains much gore; myriad acts of violence; sacrilegious behavior and banter; blatant sexuality, including much upper female nudity; semi-graphic encounters; pervasive rough language and profanity; considerable innuendo; torture; and vigilante justice. The Catholic News Service classification is O—morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R—restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

*****
John P. McCarthy is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.


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Anthony Claret: The "spiritual father of Cuba" was a missionary, religious founder, social reformer, queen’s chaplain, writer and publisher, archbishop and refugee. He was a Spaniard whose work took him to the Canary Islands, Cuba, Madrid, Paris and to the First Vatican Council. 
<p>In his spare time as weaver and designer in the textile mills of Barcelona, he learned Latin and printing: The future priest and publisher was preparing. Ordained at 28, he was prevented by ill health from entering religious life as a Carthusian or as a Jesuit, but went on to become one of Spain’s most popular preachers. </p><p>He spent 10 years giving popular missions and retreats, always placing great emphasis on the Eucharist and devotion to the Immaculate Heart of Mary. Her rosary, it was said, was never out of his hand. At 42, beginning with five young priests, he founded a religious institute of missionaries, known today as the Claretians. </p><p>He was appointed to head the much-neglected archdiocese of Santiago in Cuba. He began its reform by almost ceaseless preaching and hearing of confessions, and suffered bitter opposition mainly for opposing concubinage and giving instruction to black slaves. A hired assassin (whose release from prison Anthony had obtained) slashed open his face and wrist. Anthony succeeded in getting the would-be assassin’s death sentence commuted to a prison term. His solution for the misery of Cubans was family-owned farms producing a variety of foods for the family’s own needs and for the market. This invited the enmity of the vested interests who wanted everyone to work on a single cash crop—sugar. Besides all his religious writings are two books he wrote in Cuba: <i>Reflections on Agriculture</i> and <i>Country Delights</i>. </p><p>He was recalled to Spain for a job he did not relish—being chaplain for the queen. He went on three conditions: He would reside away from the palace, he would come only to hear the queen’s confession and instruct the children and he would be exempt from court functions. In the revolution of 1868, he fled with the queen’s party to Paris, where he preached to the Spanish colony. </p><p>All his life Anthony was interested in the Catholic press. He founded the Religious Publishing House, a major Catholic publishing venture in Spain, and wrote or published 200 books and pamphlets. </p><p>At Vatican I, where he was a staunch defender of the doctrine of infallibility, he won the admiration of his fellow bishops. Cardinal Gibbons of Baltimore remarked of him, "There goes a true saint." At the age of 63, he died in exile near the border of Spain.</p> American Catholic Blog The greatest tragedy of our world is that men do not know, really know, that God loves them. Some believe it in a shadowy sort of way. If they were to really think about it they would soon realize that their belief in God’s love for them is very remote and abstract. Because of this lack of realization of God’s love for them, men do not know how to love God back. —Catherine de Hueck Doherty

 
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