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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

The Last Exorcism

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service


Ashley Bell, Patrick Fabian, Louis Herthum and Caleb Landry Jones star in "The Last Exorcism." The Catholic News Service classification is L—limited adult audience.
"There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy." So says the haunted Prince of Denmark in the first act of Shakespeare's "Hamlet," and so the main character discovers in the middling fright fest "The Last Exorcism" (Lionsgate).

While the gore factor is kept comparatively low in director Daniel Stamm's Gothic outing, an ambiguous approach to faith and a dark occult atmosphere make this feature inappropriate for all but well-grounded and judicious adult viewers.

Preparing to perform the titular rite, as the film opens, is Baton Rouge-based evangelical minister and self-confessed charlatan Cotton Marcus (Patrick Fabian). Alarmed by news reports of a boy who was injured during an exorcism, Cotton has decided to abandon the practice, which he regards as nothing more than an opportunity to fleece over-credulous believers.

To publicize the trickery behind his supposed confrontations with Satan, Cotton has invited documentary filmmaker Iris Reisen (Iris Bahr) and her cameraman to tag along for his swan song as he responds to the anguished summons of fervent farmer Louis Sweetzer (Louis Herthum). The farmer fears that his 16-year-old daughter, Nell (Ashley Bell), is possessed.

Armed with elaborate special-effects gadgetry, including a crucifix that gives off smoke at the press of a button, Cotton arrives at the predictably spooky Sweetzer homestead and goes through the motions of liberating Nell's soul. But he gets more than he bargained for when the girl begins to show signs that she is indeed in the grip of something, or someone, supernatural.

Though shaky on the details -- as an evangelical, for instance, Cotton would be far more likely to make use of a plain cross than a crucifix in his staged efforts to send the devil packing -- the script by Huck Botko and Andrew Gurland does toy cleverly with the modern presumption that all phenomena can be explained scientifically.

But the corrosive cynicism Cotton displays in the buildup to his encounter with Nell, which includes scornful references to an "exorcism academy" sponsored by the Vatican, will not sit well with Catholic audiences. And the diabolical doings of the movie's climax are not for the impressionable.

The film contains a complex treatment of religion, sacrilegious activity, some gruesome images, at least two uses of profanity, brief sexual talk and references to incest and homosexuality. The Catholic News Service classification is L -- limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13 -- parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

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Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.



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Thomas the Apostle: Poor Thomas! He made one remark and has been branded as “Doubting Thomas” ever since. But if he doubted, he also believed. He made what is certainly the most explicit statement of faith in the New Testament: “My Lord and My God!” (see John 20:24-28) and, in so expressing his faith, gave Christians a prayer that will be said till the end of time. He also occasioned a compliment from Jesus to all later Christians: “Have you come to believe because you have seen me? Blessed are those who have not seen and have believed” (John 20:29). 
<p>Thomas should be equally well known for his courage. Perhaps what he said was impetuous—since he ran, like the rest, at the showdown—but he can scarcely have been insincere when he expressed his willingness to die with Jesus. The occasion was when Jesus proposed to go to Bethany after Lazarus had died. Since Bethany was near Jerusalem, this meant walking into the very midst of his enemies and to almost certain death. Realizing this, Thomas said to the other apostles, “Let us also go to die with him” (John 11:16b).</p> American Catholic Blog Slow down as you make the Sign of the Cross. Intentionally purify your mind and your heart, and ask God to strengthen you to carry his love to the world.

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