AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Nanny McPhee Returns

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service


Lil Woods, Asa Butterfield, Oscar Steer and Emma Thompson, right, star in "Nanny McPhee Returns."
A sweetly nostalgic tale underpinned by lessons both children and their seniors would do well to take to heart, "Nanny McPhee Returns" (Universal) contains nothing genuinely objectionable. Running gags featuring mildly gross barnyard humor and a few scenes of slapstick violence, though, may give some parents pause.

Emma Thompson reprises her work as both writer and star, once again personifying the eerie but magically effective matron of the title in this second screen adventure based on Christianna Brand's "Nurse Matilda" series of children's books. This time she transports herself to wartime Britain—the first film was set in Victorian times—where she comes to the rescue of frazzled rural mother Isabel Green (Maggie Gyllenhaal).

With husband Rory (Ewan McGregor) away at the front, Isabel is failing spectacularly to cope with the raucous squabbling between her farm-bred brood—elder son Norman (Asa Butterfield), daughter Megsie (Lil Woods) and tow-headed tot Vincent (Oscar Steer)—and their snobbish London cousins Celia and Cyril Gray (Rosie Taylor-Ritson and Eros Vlahos). The latter are freshly arrived evacuees whose parents have sent them to the countryside for safety.

Thoroughly unimpressed by their new surroundings—surveying the Green's manure-laden farmyard, Cyril, in one of the script's many verbal and visual jokes on the subject, compares it to a "British museum of poo"—Celia and Cyril show an aggressive peevishness we later learn is due, at least in part, to parental indifference and emotional repression. Their temporarily fatherless cousins, needless to say, match them insult for insult and, all too soon, blow for blow.

Mysteriously appearing on Isabel's doorstep, the initially frightful-faced Nanny—who gets to look more and more like Emma Thompson as her charges' behavior improves—sets to work using the powers primarily vested in her gnarly (in every sense) walking stick to set things right. She soon has the children learning to cooperate, to share, to show courage in pursuing important goals and—especially after the war comes home to them in a potentially tragic fashion—to have faith in happy endings.

Nanny also works to thwart the schemes of Isabel's conniving brother-in-law Phil (Rhys Ifans) who—for reasons of his own—has been pressing Isabel to sign away the family homestead in Rory's absence.

Though the background conflict is intended to be both World War II and an archetypical, timeless struggle, the simple joys that delight the children—a picnic, a treat of ginger beer and the like—seem like those of an earlier era. And the closest thing to modern technology on display is an eccentric contraption of Rory's invention designed to calm piglets by simultaneously playing music to them on a gramophone and wielding a set of brushes to scratch their tummies soothingly.

Under the influence of one of Nanny's spells, said piglets contradict an old expression by flying through the air, then get together for a demonstration of balletic swimming that Esther Williams herself might have envied. Such scenes typify the silly but innocent fun of this family-friendly sequel.

The Catholic News Service classification is A-I—general patronage. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG—parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.

*****
John Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.


Search reviews at CatholicMovieReviews.org


Thank you for your comments. Editors will review all posts before they are visible on the website.

blog comments powered by Disqus







Emmanuel Ruiz and Companions: Not much is known of the early life of Emmanuel Ruiz, but details of his heroic death in defense of the faith have come down to us.
<p>Born of humble parents in Santander, Spain, he became a Franciscan priest and served as a missionary in Damascus. This was at a time when anti-Christian riots shook Syria and thousands lost their lives in just a short time.</p><p>Among these were Emmanuel, superior of the Franciscan convent, seven other friars and three laymen. When a menacing crowd came looking for the men, they refused to renounce their faith and become Muslims. The men were subjected to horrible tortures before their martyrdom.</p><p>Emmanuel, his brother Franciscans and the three Maronite laymen were beatified in 1926 by Pope Pius XI.</p> American Catholic Blog Lord, your mother gave us the rosary to save us from the evil world. Help us to spread her devotion. Help us to honor her request that we pray the rosary. Help us meditate on your life and the grace of salvation you bring us.

Stumble Virtue Vice and the Space Between

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Caregiver
Our lives are interwoven with one another and we are called to respond generously to those in need.

Birthday
Send a wish that each tomorrow of the coming year will be full of life and peace!

Mary's Flower - Columbine
Mary, let us follow your footprints. Even better, teach us to walk in your shoes.

Independence Day
Happy Fourth of July from Catholic Greetings and AmericanCatholic.org!

Name Day
No e-card for their patron? Don't worry, a name day greeting fills the bill!




Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2015