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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Step Up 3D

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service


Rick Malambri and Sharni Vinson star in "Step Up 3D."
Three-dimensional effects enhance the precision choreography showcased in "Step Up 3D" (Disney).

But the nimble numbers in this tale retreading familiar Hollywood themes of dream fulfillment and the self-selecting circle of friends as do-it-yourself substitute family are interspersed with flat-footed dialogue, a creaky plot and some provocative moves and lyrics.

This third installment of the street stomping franchise, which began with 2006's "Step Up," shifts the setting from Baltimore to New York and focuses on Luke (Rick Malambri), the charismatic and caring leader of a Gotham dance crew called the Pirates.

Discovering, in rapid succession, the hoofing gifts of New York University freshman Moose (Adam G. Sevani) and nightclub denizen Natalie (Sharni Vinson), Luke recruits them for the group, taking slightly nerdy engineering student Moose under his man-of-the-world wing while quickly succumbing to Natalie's charms. Luke, we learn, needs all the help he can get to win the upcoming, multi-round dance championship called World Jam, the proceeds from which will forestall foreclosure on the loft where he and the Pirates live and practice.

But Moose is plagued by academic and amorous distractions, the latter caused by his high school best bud and fellow NYU frosh Camille (Alyson Stoner), who secretly yearns to be more than just pals, while Natalie—despite her sensitive support for Luke's potential as a would-be filmmaker—is not, alas, all she seems. Also hindering Luke's quest for the World Jam prize money is former friend-turned-rival Julien (Joe Slaughter), the scheming, underhanded frontman for the Pirates' main opposition, the Samurai.

Inept storytelling aside—oh, no, Moose's big test is the same night as the next World Jam match!—there's a generally buoyant feel to the proceedings in director Jon M. Chu's follow-up to his 2008 feature debut "Step Up 2: The Streets," best exemplified perhaps by a sidewalks-of-New York set piece shared by Moose and Camille that cleverly evokes classic Tinseltown fare of the Astaire-Rogers and Gene Kelly variety.

Both of the main romantic relationships are wholesome, straying no further than Luke and Natalie's occasional dance-floor clinch. And the passing flashes of humor in Amy Andelson and Emily Meyer's script—several of them playing on the stereotype of the hard-boiled Gothamite -- mostly hit the mark, though some viewers of faith may be put off by a joking application of the phrase "What would Jesus do?"

The film contains at least one use of the S-word, occasional crass language, a mildly irreverent joke and scenes of moderately suggestive dancing. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III—adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13— parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

*****
John Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.



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Wolfgang of Regensburg: Wolfgang was born in Swabia, Germany, and was educated at a school located at the abbey of Reichenau. There he encountered Henry, a young noble who went on to become Archbishop of Trier. Meanwhile, Wolfgang remained in close contact with the archbishop, teaching in his cathedral school and supporting his efforts to reform the clergy. 
<p>At the death of the archbishop, Wolfgang chose to become a Benedictine monk and moved to an abbey in Einsiedeln, now part of Switzerland. Ordained a priest, he was appointed director of the monastery school there. Later he was sent to Hungary as a missionary, though his zeal and good will yielded limited results. </p><p>Emperor Otto II appointed him Bishop of Regensburg near Munich. He immediately initiated reform of the clergy and of religious life, preaching with vigor and effectiveness and always demonstrating special concern for the poor. He wore the habit of a monk and lived an austere life. </p><p>The draw to monastic life never left him, including the desire for a life of solitude. At one point he left his diocese so that he could devote himself to prayer, but his responsibilities as bishop called him back. </p><p>In 994 Wolfgang became ill while on a journey; he died in Puppingen near Linz, Austria. He was canonized in 1052. His feast day is celebrated widely in much of central Europe. </p> American Catholic Blog Keep your gaze always on our most beloved Jesus, asking him in the depths of his heart what he desires for you, and never deny him anything even if it means going strongly against the grain for you. –Blessed Maria Sagrario of St. Aloysius Gonzaga

 
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