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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Predators

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service

Toward the end of "Predators" (Fox), a character camouflages himself by covering his torso with mud. That's an apt symbol for this dreary sci-fi sequel which, despite a halfhearted last-reel lesson about the need to maintain civilized values, is mostly a bespattered survey of nasty ways to die.

As for Alex Litvak's script, it's chockablock with obscenities throughout, and even the second-to-last word of dialogue is an unprintable one.

Director Nimrod Antal's addition to the thriller franchise that began with 1987's "Predator" pits a random collection of human warriors and criminals against the invisibility-cloaked aliens of the title, who are out to hunt hominids for sport. The extraterrestrials' chosen hunting ground is a steamy jungle into which each of the earthlings has been unwillingly, and mysteriously, parachuted.

Along with their eventual leader, experienced mercenary Royce (Adrien Brody), this unsavory gang includes—but is not limited to—Israeli Defense Forces sniper Isabelle (Alice Braga), serial killer Stans (Walton Goggins), drug-gang enforcer Cuchillo (Danny Trejo) and Russian Special Forces operative Nikolai (Oleg Taktarov). (Given the premise, you can tell Nikolai has been up to no good in Chechnya even before he mentions it.)

A seemingly incongruous addition to their company is respectable and mild-mannered physician Edwin (Topher Grace).

As this motley crew dodges deadly booby traps, alien warthogs and the daggerlike appendages their pursuers are capable of sprouting at all the wrong moments, they cross paths with Noland (Laurence Fishburne), a slightly addled veteran of the aliens' cat-and-mouse ordeal.

But this encounter turns out to be just a detour in their bloody quest for survival, which sees the group gradually whittled down by impalings, eviscerations and other unpleasant spectacles.

The film contains frequent graphic violence, some of it gruesome, a few uses of profanity and pervasive rough and crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is O—morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R—restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

*****
John Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.



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Peter Regalado: Peter lived at a very busy time in history. The Great Western Schism (1378-1417) was settled at the Council of Constance (1414-1418). France and England were fighting the Hundred Years’ War, and in 1453 the Byzantine Empire was completely wiped out by the loss of Constantinople to the Turks. At Peter’s death the age of printing had just begun in Germany, and Columbus's arrival in the New World was less than 40 years away. 
<p>Peter came from a wealthy and pious family in Valladolid, Spain. At the age of 13, he was allowed to enter the Conventual Franciscans. Shortly after his ordination, he was made superior of the friary in Aguilar. He became part of a group of friars who wanted to lead a life of greater poverty and penance. In 1442 he was appointed head of all the Spanish Franciscans in his reform group. </p><p>Peter led the friars by his example. A special love of the poor and the sick characterized Peter. Miraculous stories are told about his charity to the poor. For example, the bread never seemed to run out as long as Peter had hungry people to feed. Throughout most of his life, Peter went hungry; he lived only on bread and water. </p><p>Immediately after his death on March 31, 1456, his grave became a place of pilgrimage. Peter was canonized in 1746.</p> American Catholic Blog Father, Jesus offered us the greatest gift he could–Himself as the food for ourselves–and the people's rejection of that gift broke His heart. Yet many Christians do the same thing today by reducing the gift of Christ’s body and blood to near symbolism. Father, help us to understand and accept Jesus as He is and never let us be a disappointment to Him! We ask this in His name, Amen.


 
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