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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Despicable Me

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service


Steve Carell voices the character of Gru in the animated film "Despicable Me."
Though he aspires to be the world's most terrible villain, Gru (voice of Steve Carell)—the character at the heart of "Despicable Me" (Universal), an enchanting 3-D animated comedy—is, in reality, only a slightly wicked rogue who ultimately proves to be a softhearted hero.

With an East European accent somewhat reminiscent of Boris Badenov, the comic heavy of the 1960s television cartoon "The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show," Gru occupies the kind of darkly gothic house the Munsters of roughly the same TV era might have comfortably called home.

In between his usually inept larger schemes—such as attempts to steal world landmarks such as the Eiffel Tower—Gru engages in such petty misdeeds as using a "freeze ray" to immobilize a line of fellow customers so he won't have to wait behind them for service.

Challenged by an upstart rival— a nerdy newcomer among evildoers who calls himself Vector (voice of Jason Segel)—Gru embarks on a project he hopes will establish his credentials as the planet's supreme baddie once and for all. With the help of mad scientist Dr. Nefario (voice of Russell Brand) and an army of comically mumbling undersized minions (think Twinkies come to life and sporting goggles), Gru plots to steal the moon out of the sky, no less.

As part of this nefarious plan, Gru winds up taking three young orphans under his wing: Margo (voice of Miranda Cosgrove), Edith (voice of Dana Gaier) and Agnes (voice of Elsie Fisher). Predictably—though nonetheless enjoyably—his temporary adoption of this trio of cuties has a life-altering effect on the would-be tough guy.

In their feature debut, co-directors Chris Renaud and Pierre Coffin—who also provide voice work for those irrepressible minions (along with Jemaine Clement)—serve up a delightfully humorous conversion tale spun around themes of loyalty and the transformative power of family love.

Timely satire is included in the form of Mr. Perkins (voice of Will Arnett), the bloated, ruthless CEO of the straightforwardly named "Bank of Evil," while Julie Andrews provides the voice of Gru's perpetually grumpy, eternally unimpressed mother.

Catholic viewers will especially appreciate a scene of the little orphans devoutly reciting their bedtime prayers.

Though the gentle proceedings—ably designed to appeal to both children and their seniors—unroll without the inclusion of any genuinely troublesome material, a few effects that might scare the most timid and a touch of mild bathroom humor may raise concerns with some parents.

The Catholic News Service classification is A-I—general patronage. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG—parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.

*****
John Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.


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Elizabeth of Portugal: Elizabeth is usually depicted in royal garb with a dove or an olive branch. At her birth in 1271, her father, Pedro III, future king of Aragon, was reconciled with his father, James, the reigning monarch. This proved to be a portent of things to come. Under the healthful influences surrounding her early years, she quickly learned self-discipline and acquired a taste for spirituality. Thus fortunately prepared, she was able to meet the challenge when, at the age of 12, she was given in marriage to Denis, king of Portugal. She was able to establish for herself a pattern of life conducive to growth in God’s love, not merely through her exercises of piety, including daily Mass, but also through her exercise of charity, by which she was able to befriend and help pilgrims, strangers, the sick, the poor—in a word, all those whose need came to her notice. At the same time she remained devoted to her husband, whose infidelity to her was a scandal to the kingdom. 
<p>He, too, was the object of many of her peace endeavors. She long sought peace for him with God, and was finally rewarded when he gave up his life of sin. She repeatedly sought and effected peace between the king and their rebellious son, Alfonso, who thought that he was passed over to favor the king’s illegitimate children. She acted as peacemaker in the struggle between Ferdinand, king of Aragon, and his cousin James, who claimed the crown. And finally from Coimbra, where she had retired as a Franciscan tertiary to the monastery of the Poor Clares after the death of her husband, she set out and was able to bring about a lasting peace between her son Alfonso, now king of Portugal, and his son-in-law, the king of Castile.</p> American Catholic Blog In the name of the Father, use my mind to bring you honor, and of the Son, fill my heart to spread your word, and of the Holy Spirit, strengthen me to carry you out to all the world. Amen.

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