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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

The Karate Kid

By
John P. McCarthy
Source: Catholic News Service


Jackie Chan and Jaden Smith star in a scene from the movie "The Karate Kid."
The ambitious desire to modernize a classic has led to many a debacle, as has the aim of cashing in on a past financial success. Fortunately, misgivings about this update of 1984's popular "The Karate Kid" dissipate once it begins to unreel.

No doubt, the producers of 2010's "The Karate Kid" (Columbia) aren't standing on the shoulders of an artistic giant, and commercial considerations are never far from their minds (hence the hiring of teen sensation Justin Bieber to croon on the soundtrack). Yet the movie stirs and satisfies, exhibiting sufficient fealty to the original while improving on its production values.

Setting it in Beijing makes sense, as does casting Jaden Smith in the title role and international action star Jackie Chan as his unassuming mentor. Switching from karate, with its Japanese provenance, to kung fu is not an issue. Other embellishments on the timeless underdog story are likewise organic and positive.  The major flaw is a grandiose musical score, which telegraphs plot points and nearly overwhelms the film, thus accentuating its relatively long running time.

The new "Karate Kid" is also designed to showcase modern China, a function it fulfills by highlighting the architectural feats connected with the 2008 Olympics and through visits to the Forbidden City, a scenic mountain sanctuary, and the Great Wall.

Mostly because of chop-socky violence, it may be inappropriate for young moviegoers. But guardians should feel free to use their judgment about individual sensitivities, being aware that kids' attention may wander given the movie's length. Generic references to Eastern spirituality and the use of an ancient Chinese healing art are no cause for concern.

Like the original, this entertaining melodrama teaches valuable lessons regarding body and spirit. Director Harald Zwart stages the action sequences and quieter moments with sufficient adroitness. Whereas Pat Morita dominated the first version (receiving an Oscar nomination for his efforts), here Smith —son of Will and Jada Pinkett Smith—shines brightest thanks to his own charisma and Chan's restrained, caricature-free performance.

The film contains hard-hitting and occasionally cruel but not graphic martial arts violence, including a boy being struck across the face by an adult, the use of a crass term for the human posterior, some mild toilet humor, one instance of sexual innuendo, and an unnecessary kiss between pre-teens. The Catholic News Service classification is A-II -- adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG -- parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.
*****
John P. McCarthy is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.




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Catherine of Siena: The value Catherine makes central in her short life and which sounds clearly and consistently through her experience is complete surrender to Christ. What is most impressive about her is that she learns to view her surrender to her Lord as a goal to be reached through time. 
<p>She was the 23rd child of Jacopo and Lapa Benincasa and grew up as an intelligent, cheerful and intensely religious person. Catherine disappointed her mother by cutting off her hair as a protest against being overly encouraged to improve her appearance in order to attract a husband. Her father ordered her to be left in peace, and she was given a room of her own for prayer and meditation. </p><p>She entered the Dominican Third Order at 18 and spent the next three years in seclusion, prayer and austerity. Gradually a group of followers gathered around her—men and women, priests and religious. An active public apostolate grew out of her contemplative life. Her letters, mostly for spiritual instruction and encouragement of her followers, began to take more and more note of public affairs. Opposition and slander resulted from her mixing fearlessly with the world and speaking with the candor and authority of one completely committed to Christ. She was cleared of all charges at the Dominican General Chapter of 1374. </p><p>Her public influence reached great heights because of her evident holiness, her membership in the Dominican Third Order, and the deep impression she made on the pope. She worked tirelessly for the crusade against the Turks and for peace between Florence and the pope </p><p>In 1378, the Great Schism began, splitting the allegiance of Christendom between two, then three, popes and putting even saints on opposing sides. Catherine spent the last two years of her life in Rome, in prayer and pleading on behalf of the cause of Urban VI and the unity of the Church. She offered herself as a victim for the Church in its agony. She died surrounded by her "children" and was canonized in 1461. </p><p>Catherine ranks high among the mystics and spiritual writers of the Church. In 1939, she and Francis of Assisi were declared co-patrons of Italy. Paul VI named her and Teresa of Avila doctors of the Church in 1970. Her spiritual testament is found in <i>The Dialogue</i>.</p> American Catholic Blog The gates of hell cannot withstand the power of heaven. Gates of sin melt in the presence of saving grace; gates of death fall in the presence of eternal life; gates of falsehood collapse in the presence of living truth; gates of violence are flattened in the presence of divine love. These are the tools with which Christ has equipped his Church.

Divine Science Michael Dennin

 
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