AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Seasonal
Saints
Special Reports
Movies
Social Media
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds

advertisement
ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Just Wright

By
Kurt Jensen
Source: Catholic News Service


Common and Queen Latifah star in a scene from the movie "Just Wright."
The familiar elements of both romantic comedy and inspirational sports films are seamlessly blended in "Just Wright" (Fox Searchlight).

Queen Latifah plays Leslie Wright, a super-competent physical therapist and hardcore New Jersey Nets fan who has come to accept—however ruefully—her status as every guy's nonromantic homegirl.

Her younger, attractive "godsister," Morgan Alexander (Paula Patton)—who lives with Leslie and Leslie's parents, Lloyd and Janice (James Pickens Jr. and Pam Grier)—has a singular ambition: to become the wife of a professional basketball player. Morgan is hopelessly shallow, interested only in status and shopping.

When Leslie has a chance encounter with New Jersey Nets star Scott McKnight (rapper Common), he finds her confidence and sunny personality appealing, and invites her to a party at his mansion. Leslie brings the flirtatious Morgan along; Scott impulsively falls for Morgan, and almost as quickly, decides to marry her.

This could be just another bitter episode for Leslie, except that Scott gets a potentially career-ending knee injury. Morgan finds Scott's fetching blond therapist a threat, so she asks Leslie to move in and go to work in her stead.

Unwilling to endure possible hardship, Morgan eventually runs off when it looks as if the Nets won't give Scott a new contract.

Will Scott's knee recover in time for the playoffs? Will Leslie's tough love restore the whole man? Will they bond over their love of classic jazz, and will he finally see that Leslie is perfect for him? Well, the script has the Nets in the NBA finals, so those willing to surrender to all the fantasy elements will likely have a very good time indeed.

Director Sanaa Hamri and screenwriter Michael Elliot (who wrote the engaging 2002 basketball comedy "Like Mike") use the lightest of touches to create a warm, likable environment and convey a message about relationships founded on enduring values.

Probably acceptable for more mature teens, despite the elements listed below.

The film contains a single use of crude language and an implied premarital encounter. The Catholic News Service classification is A-II—adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG—parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.

*****
Kurt Jensen is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.


Search reviews at CatholicMovieReviews.org


Thank you for your comments. Editors will review all posts before they are visible on the website.

blog comments powered by Disqus






Conrad of Parzham: Conrad spent most of his life as porter in Altoetting, Bavaria, letting people into the friary and indirectly encouraging them to let God into their lives. 
<p>His parents, Bartholomew and Gertrude Birndorfer, lived near Parzham, Bavaria. In those days this region was recovering from the Napoleonic wars. A lover of solitary prayer and a peacemaker as a young man, Conrad joined the Capuchins as a brother. He made his profession in 1852 and was assigned to the friary in Altoetting. That city’s shrine to Mary was very popular; at the nearby Capuchin friary there was a lot of work for the porter, a job Conrad held for 41 years. </p><p>At first some of the other friars were jealous that such a young friar held this important job. Conrad’s patience and holy life overcame their doubts. As porter he dealt with many people, obtaining many of the friary supplies and generously providing for the poor who came to the door. He treated them all with the courtesy Francis expected of his followers. </p><p>Conrad’s helpfulness was sometimes unnerving. Once Father Vincent, seeking quiet to prepare a sermon, went up the belltower of the church. Conrad tracked him down when someone wanting to go to confession specifically requested Father Vincent. </p><p>Conrad also developed a special rapport with the children of the area. He enthusiastically promoted the Seraphic Work of Charity, which aided neglected children. </p><p>Conrad spent hours in prayer before the Blessed Sacrament. He regularly asked the Blessed Mother to intercede for him and for the many people he included in his prayers. The ever-patient Conrad was canonized in 1934.</p> American Catholic Blog The Resurrection is neither optimism nor idealism; it is truth. Atheism proclaims the tomb is full; Christians know it is empty.

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
Epic Food Fight
With humor and practical wit, Fr. Leo invites you to read, savor, and digest the truth of our faith in new and appetizing ways!
A Spiritual Banquet!

Whether you are new to cooking, highly experienced, or just enjoy good food, Table of Plenty invites you into experiencing meals as a sacred time.

Pope Francis!

Why did the pope choose the name Francis? Find out in this new book by Gina Loehr.

The Seven Last Words

By focusing on God's love for humanity expressed in the gift of Jesus, The Last Words of Jesus serves as a rich source of meditation throughout the year.

Visiting Mary
In this book Cragon captures the experience of visiting these shrines, giving us a personal glimpse into each place.

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Easter
Catholic Greetings and AmericanCatholic.org wish you a most holy and joyous Easter season!
Holy Saturday
Catholic Greetings and AmericanCatholic.org wish you a most holy and joyous Easter season!
Good Friday
Observe the Paschal Triduum this weekend with your parish family.
Holy Thursday
The Church remembers today both the institution of the Eucharist and our mandate to service.
Wednesday of Holy Week
Today join Catholics around the world in offering prayers for our Pope Emeritus on his 87th birthday.



Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic