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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Furry Vengeance

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service


Brendan Fraser stars in a scene from the movie "Furry Vengeance."
It's fairly obvious that the painfully flat comedy "Furry Vengeance" (Summit)—which sees a cohort of woodland creatures conspiring to halt an unwelcome new housing development—is intended to be a kid-friendly invitation to ecological sensitivity.

But director Roger Kumble's frequently distasteful romp registers as more juvenile than sprightly, while the film's underlying themes—which also include the priority of family life over career advancement—though honorable, are driven home far too ham-handedly.

The main target of the animals' concerted wrath is Chicago-based construction supervisor Dan Sanders (Brendan Fraser). At the bidding of his scheming boss Neal Lyman (Ken Jeong), Dan has moved to the wilds of Oregon—bringing along his unwillingly uprooted wife Tammy (Brooke Shields) and teen son Tyler (Matt Prokop)—to oversee the building of a subdivision he genuinely, though naively, believes will be environmentally responsible.

With their pristine habitat under siege, the local critters unleash a torrent of torments on Dan that range from repeated skunk attacks to an onslaught by the group's raccoon ringleader during which the organizationally gifted varmint urinates in Dan's mouth. So when Dan eventually seeks shelter from a rampaging bear in his workers' Port-o-Potty, it's not hard to guess what will happen next.

A subplot focusing on Tyler's budding relationship with inconveniently green-conscious small-town girl Amber (Skyler Samuels) is remarkably restrained by current screen standards, since Michael Carnes and Josh Gilbert's script portrays the pair's first kiss as a major undertaking, not to be entered into unadvisedly or lightly.

But the writing reverts to form as Dan emerges from a nearby swamp into which his anthropomorphized adversaries have succeeded in making him drive his SUV to announce to Tammy, Tyler and Amber that a leech has attached itself to his "no-no zone."

Patches of dialogue designed to make more serious points, charting Dan's gradual conversion from materialist to naturalist and from careerist to caring father, also land with a resounding thud. Thus, when Dan explains to Tammy that he's so focused on his work only because he wants to be able to give her and Tyler everything, she replies—all too predictably—"We don't want everything; we just want you."

The film contains much scatological humor and some comic violence. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is A-II—adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG—parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.

*****
John Mulderig is on the staff of the Office for Film & Broadcasting of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.




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Athanasius: Athanasius led a tumultuous but dedicated life of service to the Church. He was the great champion of the faith against the widespread heresy of Arianism, the teaching by Arius that Jesus was not truly divine. The vigor of his writings earned him the title of doctor of the Church. 
<p>Born of a Christian family in Alexandria, Egypt, and given a classical education, Athanasius became secretary to Alexander, the bishop of Alexandria, entered the priesthood and was eventually named bishop himself. His predecessor, Alexander, had been an outspoken critic of a new movement growing in the East—Arianism. </p><p>When Athanasius assumed his role as bishop of Alexandria, he continued the fight against Arianism. At first it seemed that the battle would be easily won and that Arianism would be condemned. Such, however, did not prove to be the case. The Council of Tyre was called and for several reasons that are still unclear, the Emperor Constantine exiled Athanasius to northern Gaul. This was to be the first in a series of travels and exiles reminiscent of the life of St. Paul. </p><p>After Constantine died, his son restored Athanasius as bishop. This lasted only a year, however, for he was deposed once again by a coalition of Arian bishops. Athanasius took his case to Rome, and Pope Julius I called a synod to review the case and other related matters. </p><p>Five times Athanasius was exiled for his defense of the doctrine of Christ’s divinity. During one period of his life, he enjoyed 10 years of relative peace—reading, writing and promoting the Christian life along the lines of the monastic ideal to which he was greatly devoted. His dogmatic and historical writings are almost all polemic, directed against every aspect of Arianism. </p><p>Among his ascetical writings, his<i> Life of St. Anthony</i> (January 17) achieved astonishing popularity and contributed greatly to the establishment of monastic life throughout the Western Christian world.</p> American Catholic Blog Suffering is redemptive in part because it definitively reveals to man that he is not in fact God, and it thereby opens the human person to receive the divine.

Divine Science Michael Dennin

 
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