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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

The Bounty Hunter

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service

The mean-spirited proceedings that occupy most of the running time of "The Bounty Hunter" (Columbia/Relativity)—a muddled, easily forgettable mix of romantic comedy and crime story—begin when Milo Boyd (Gerard Butler), a washed-up former cop who's now the fugitive tracker of the title, gets the delightful news that his latest target is his detested ex-wife, journalist Nicole Hurley (Jennifer Aniston).

A dedicated reporter, Nicole has ended up on the wrong side of the law after skipping a court date in order to pursue a potential case of police corruption.

The erstwhile couple's charming interaction—Milo has little difficulty in tracking Nicole down—sees him locking her in the trunk of his car, her attempting to escape by jabbing him with a lighted emergency flare, his chasing after her and tackling her to the ground; and that's all before a set of handcuffs and a Taser stun gun come into play.

In between taking their aggressions out on each other, the pair gets entangled in the conspiracy that got Nicole in trouble in the first place. So it's not long before they're on the lam together, dodging bullets from bad men in black vans and—far less successfully—a renewed hail of arrows from Cupid's bow.

By this time, however, any potentially heartwarming elements in director Andy Tennant's predictable tale of rekindling romance have long since been lost amid the frenetic shuffle.

The film contains some action violence, scenes of torture, brief rear nudity, several sexual jokes and references, about eight uses of profanity and a bit of rough and much crude language. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is L—limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13—parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

*****
John Mulderig is on the staff of the Office for Film & Broadcasting of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.



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Joan of Arc: 
		<p>Burned at the stake as a heretic after a politically-motivated trial, Joan was beatified in 1909 and canonized in 1920.</p>
		<p>Born of a fairly well-to-do peasant couple in Domremy-Greux (southeast of Paris), Joan was only 12 when she experienced a vision and heard voices that she later identified as Sts. Michael the Archangel, Catherine of Alexandria, and Margaret of Antioch.</p>
		<p>During the Hundred Years War, she led French troops against the English and recaptured the cities of Orléans and Troyes. This enabled Charles VII to be crowned as king in Reims in 1429. Captured near Compiegne the following year, she was sold to the English and placed on trial for heresy and witchcraft. Professors at the University of Paris supported Bishop Pierre Cauchon of Beauvis, the judge at her trial; Cardinal Henry Beaufort of Winchester, England, participated in the questioning of Joan in prison. In the end, she was condemned for wearing men's clothes. The English resented France's military success–to which Joan contributed. </p>
		<p>On this day in 1431, she was burned at the stake in Rouen, and her ashes were scattered in the Seine River. A second Church trial 25 years later nullified the earlier verdict, which was reached under political pressure.</p>
		<p>Remembered by most people for her military exploits, Joan had a great love for the sacraments, which strengthened her compassion toward the poor. Popular devotion to her increased greatly in 19th-century France and later among French soldiers during World War I. Theologian George Tavard writes that her life "offers a perfect example of the conjunction of contemplation and action" because her spiritual insight is that there should be a "unity of heaven and earth."</p>
		<p>Joan of Arc has been the subject of many books, plays, operas, and movies. </p>
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