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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

The Wolfman

By
John P. McCarthy
Source: Catholic News Service


Anthony Hopkins and Benicio Del Toro star in the action-horror film "The Wolfman."
Alternately spooky, savage and silly, "The Wolfman" (Universal) entertains by rendering the trappings of lycanthrope lore with first-rate special effects and actors willing to feast on the material. A remake of the 1941 monster classic "The Wolf Man," it strikes a tone that might be described as "visceral camp."

The amount and kind of violence displayed is in keeping with the fear-inducing context. Though not for the squeamish, displays of the titular creature's bloody handiwork rarely feel gratuitous and help keep the picture hovering somewhere between art and pulp.

Unafraid to exploit cliches of the werewolf subgenre, director Joe Johnston cuts to the cloud-shrouded moon and inserts howls with abandon. In general, his approach suggests a desire to satisfy horror aficionados and novices alike. That the protagonist's transformations from man to beast are so convincing is a bonus for everyone.

Sympathy for Lawrence Talbot, played by Lon Chaney Jr. in the original, is heightened by Benicio Del Toro's performance. Not only is Del Toro a feral actor, but the humanity of his characters never fails to come through. Following his brother's mysterious, brutal murder, Lawrence—a famous stage actor—returns to his ancestral home in Broadmoor, England. The year is 1891.

Strewn with leaves and cobwebs, Talbot Hall is a slate-gray pile occupied by his eccentric father Sir John (Anthony Hopkins in masterful fettle). Also in residence is Gwen Conliffe (Emily Blunt), his brother's grieving fiancee.

Lawrence vows to discover who or what dismembered his late sibling. Many villagers believe the Gypsies encamped nearby are to blame. Inspector Abberline (Hugo Weaving) of Scotland Yard suspects Lawrence is the lunatic responsible for the attacks, which continue.

The (presumably Anglican) vicar of Broadmoor is depicted in an unflattering light, leading a vigilante posse against Lawrence and delivering a fiery sermon about the terror confronting the village. Yet he proves to be more prescient about its malevolent source than the medical establishment, represented by the staff at a London asylum who subject Lawrence to sadistic treatments (for which they pay dearly).

The movie contains frequent episodes of moderately graphic violence, including fleeting images of human entrails, decapitations, and severed limbs; an instance of partial upper female nudity; several references to prostitution; and one use of profane language. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is A-III—adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R—restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

*****
John P. McCarthy is a guest reviewer for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' Office for Film & Broadcasting.



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John Vianney: A man with vision overcomes obstacles and performs deeds that seem impossible. John Vianney was a man with vision: He wanted to become a priest. But he had to overcome his meager formal schooling, which inadequately prepared him for seminary studies. 
<p>His failure to comprehend Latin lectures forced him to discontinue. But his vision of being a priest urged him to seek private tutoring. After a lengthy battle with the books, John was ordained. </p><p>Situations calling for “impossible” deeds followed him everywhere. As pastor of the parish at Ars, John encountered people who were indifferent and quite comfortable with their style of living. His vision led him through severe fasts and short nights of sleep. (Some devils can only be cast out by prayer and fasting.) </p><p>With Catherine Lassagne and Benedicta Lardet, he established La Providence, a home for girls. Only a man of vision could have such trust that God would provide for the spiritual and material needs of all those who came to make La Providence their home. </p><p>His work as a confessor is John Vianney’s most remarkable accomplishment. In the winter months he was to spend 11 to 12 hours daily reconciling people with God. In the summer months this time was increased to 16 hours. Unless a man was dedicated to his vision of a priestly vocation, he could not have endured this giving of self day after day. </p><p>Many people look forward to retirement and taking it easy, doing the things they always wanted to do but never had the time. But John Vianney had no thoughts of retirement. As his fame spread, more hours were consumed in serving God’s people. Even the few hours he would allow himself for sleep were disturbed frequently by the devil. </p><p>Who, but a man with vision, could keep going with ever-increasing strength? In 1929, Pope Pius XI named him the patron of parish priests worldwide.</p> American Catholic Blog The most beautiful and spontaneous expressions of joy which I have seen during my life were by poor people who had little to hold on to. –Pope Francis

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