AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Year of Mercy
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Shopping
Donate
Blog
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

The Wolfman

By
John P. McCarthy
Source: Catholic News Service


Anthony Hopkins and Benicio Del Toro star in the action-horror film "The Wolfman."
Alternately spooky, savage and silly, "The Wolfman" (Universal) entertains by rendering the trappings of lycanthrope lore with first-rate special effects and actors willing to feast on the material. A remake of the 1941 monster classic "The Wolf Man," it strikes a tone that might be described as "visceral camp."

The amount and kind of violence displayed is in keeping with the fear-inducing context. Though not for the squeamish, displays of the titular creature's bloody handiwork rarely feel gratuitous and help keep the picture hovering somewhere between art and pulp.

Unafraid to exploit cliches of the werewolf subgenre, director Joe Johnston cuts to the cloud-shrouded moon and inserts howls with abandon. In general, his approach suggests a desire to satisfy horror aficionados and novices alike. That the protagonist's transformations from man to beast are so convincing is a bonus for everyone.

Sympathy for Lawrence Talbot, played by Lon Chaney Jr. in the original, is heightened by Benicio Del Toro's performance. Not only is Del Toro a feral actor, but the humanity of his characters never fails to come through. Following his brother's mysterious, brutal murder, Lawrence—a famous stage actor—returns to his ancestral home in Broadmoor, England. The year is 1891.

Strewn with leaves and cobwebs, Talbot Hall is a slate-gray pile occupied by his eccentric father Sir John (Anthony Hopkins in masterful fettle). Also in residence is Gwen Conliffe (Emily Blunt), his brother's grieving fiancee.

Lawrence vows to discover who or what dismembered his late sibling. Many villagers believe the Gypsies encamped nearby are to blame. Inspector Abberline (Hugo Weaving) of Scotland Yard suspects Lawrence is the lunatic responsible for the attacks, which continue.

The (presumably Anglican) vicar of Broadmoor is depicted in an unflattering light, leading a vigilante posse against Lawrence and delivering a fiery sermon about the terror confronting the village. Yet he proves to be more prescient about its malevolent source than the medical establishment, represented by the staff at a London asylum who subject Lawrence to sadistic treatments (for which they pay dearly).

The movie contains frequent episodes of moderately graphic violence, including fleeting images of human entrails, decapitations, and severed limbs; an instance of partial upper female nudity; several references to prostitution; and one use of profane language. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is A-III—adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R—restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

*****
John P. McCarthy is a guest reviewer for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' Office for Film & Broadcasting.





Thank you for your comments. Editors will review all posts before they are visible on the website.

blog comments powered by Disqus







Ignatius of Loyola: The founder of the Jesuits was on his way to military fame and fortune when a cannon ball shattered his leg. Because there were no books of romance on hand during his convalescence, Ignatius whiled away the time reading a life of Christ and lives of the saints. His conscience was deeply touched, and a long, painful turning to Christ began. Having seen the Mother of God in a vision, he made a pilgrimage to her shrine at Montserrat (near Barcelona). He remained for almost a year at nearby Manresa, sometimes with the Dominicans, sometimes in a pauper’s hospice, often in a cave in the hills praying. After a period of great peace of mind, he went through a harrowing trial of scruples. There was no comfort in anything—prayer, fasting, sacraments, penance. At length, his peace of mind returned. 
<p>It was during this year of conversion that Ignatius began to write down material that later became his greatest work, the <em>Spiritual Exercises</em>. </p><p>He finally achieved his purpose of going to the Holy Land, but could not remain, as he planned, because of the hostility of the Turks. He spent the next 11 years in various European universities, studying with great difficulty, beginning almost as a child. Like many others, his orthodoxy was questioned; Ignatius was twice jailed for brief periods. </p><p>In 1534, at the age of 43, he and six others (one of whom was St. Francis Xavier, December 2) vowed to live in poverty and chastity and to go to the Holy Land. If this became impossible, they vowed to offer themselves to the apostolic service of the pope. The latter became the only choice. Four years later Ignatius made the association permanent. The new Society of Jesus was approved by Paul III, and Ignatius was elected to serve as the first general. </p><p>When companions were sent on various missions by the pope, Ignatius remained in Rome, consolidating the new venture, but still finding time to found homes for orphans, catechumens and penitents. He founded the Roman College, intended to be the model of all other colleges of the Society. </p><p>Ignatius was a true mystic. He centered his spiritual life on the essential foundations of Christianity—the Trinity, Christ, the Eucharist. His spirituality is expressed in the Jesuit motto, <i>ad majorem Dei gloriam</i>—“for the greater glory of God.” In his concept, obedience was to be the prominent virtue, to assure the effectiveness and mobility of his men. All activity was to be guided by a true love of the Church and unconditional obedience to the Holy Father, for which reason all professed members took a fourth vow to go wherever the pope should send them for the salvation of souls.</p> American Catholic Blog Venting negative emotions, contrary to popular misconception, doesn’t ease them. Through mental rehearsal, it tends to aggravate them. It can convince the venter that life is the way she sees it, even if in reality it’s not. Writing down all of one’s upsets doesn’t generally help ease those upsets.

New Call-to-action

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Mary's Flower - Fuchsia
Mary, nourish my love for you and for Jesus.

Wedding Anniversary
We continue to fall in love again and again throughout our years together.

Summer Vacation
If your summer plans include a trip to the beach, take a child’s delight in this element of creation.

World Youth Day
Encourage young people to pray with and for their contemporaries in Krakow this week.

Sts. Joachim and Anne
Tell your grandparents what they mean to you with this Catholic Greetings e-card.




Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2016