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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Brothers

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service


Tobey Maguire and Jake Gyllenhaal star in a scene from the movie "Brothers."
Though it offers a timely exploration of the dehumanizing effects of violence and the often difficult-to-bridge gulf between combat and civilian life, the war drama "Brothers" (Lionsgate/Relativity)—director Jim Sheridan's adaptation of Susanne Bier's 2004 Danish film "Brodre"—is left flatfooted by David Benioff's cliche-ridden and simplistic script.

This is all the sadder since the fine cast—led by Tobey Maguire and Jake Gyllenhaal as the titular siblings and including Sam Shepard as their Vietnam-vet dad—do their best to add intensity to the somber, seriously minded proceedings.

Yet, as soon as we see upstanding Marine Sam Cahill (Maguire) depart the domestic tranquility of the home he shares with devoted wife Grace (Natalie Portman) and young daughters Isabelle (Bailee Madison) and Maggie (Taylor Geare) to fetch his fraternal opposite, charming ne'er-do-well Tommy (Gyllenhaal), on the latter's release from a prison stint, it's a cinch that subtlety will not be this cautionary tale's secret weapon.

An apparently fatal helicopter crash during Sam's latest tour of duty in Afghanistan, to which he ships off a few days later, initiates a role reversal. Tommy's previous lifestyle, since regaining his freedom, has been that of a bar-hopping bachelor. He nonetheless takes easily to his new role as Grace's substitute companion and caregiver to the kids, and he gradually matures from family black sheep to would-be family man.

Sam, meanwhile, who survived the accident only to be taken prisoner by the Taliban, suffers a horrifying moral breakdown during his captivity that threatens to haunt him for life.

Though Tommy and Grace, sincerely believing Sam to be lost, find their feelings for each other increasingly conflicted, they generally manage to exercise physical restraint, except for a moment when their prudence is undermined by a combination of beer and marijuana.

This comes soon after one of the plot's moral highlights when, as part of the turnaround in his outlook, Tommy approaches the victim of the robbery for which he was imprisoned to seek her forgiveness. His description of her relief at being assured that she need no longer fear him powerfully conveys the healing effect which such an encounter can accomplish.

Sam's path to reconciliation, though more perilous and more onerous, suggests, at least in a secular context, the value of confession, communication and vulnerable openness to the emotional support of loved ones.

The film contains sporadic intense violence, including torture; drug use, adultery and suicide themes; a few uses of profanity and frequent rough and some crude language. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is A-III—adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R—restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

******
Mulderig is on the staff of the Office for Film & Broadcasting of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.




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Cyril of Alexandria: Saints are not born with halos around their heads. Cyril, recognized as a great teacher of the Church, began his career as archbishop of Alexandria, Egypt, with impulsive, often violent, actions. He pillaged and closed the churches of the Novatian heretics (who required those who denied the faith to be rebaptized), participated in the deposing of St. John Chrysostom (September 13) and confiscated Jewish property, expelling the Jews from Alexandria in retaliation for their attacks on Christians. 
<p>Cyril’s importance for theology and Church history lies in his championing the cause of orthodoxy against the heresy of Nestorius, who taught that in Christ there were two persons, one human and one divine.</p><p>The controversy centered around the two natures in Christ. Nestorius would not agree to the title “God-bearer” for Mary (January 1). He preferred “Christ-bearer,” saying there are two distinct persons in Christ (divine and human) joined only by a moral union. He said Mary was not the mother of God but only of the man Christ, whose humanity was only a temple of God. Nestorianism implied that the humanity of Christ was a mere disguise. </p><p>Presiding as the pope’s representative at the Council of Ephesus (431), Cyril condemned Nestorianism and proclaimed Mary truly the “God-bearer” (the mother of the one Person who is truly God and truly human). In the confusion that followed, Cyril was deposed and imprisoned for three months, after which he was welcomed back to Alexandria as a second Athanasius (the champion against Arianism). </p><p>Besides needing to soften some of his opposition to those who had sided with Nestorius, Cyril had difficulties with some of his own allies, who thought he had gone too far, sacrificing not only language but orthodoxy. Until his death, his policy of moderation kept his extreme partisans under control. On his deathbed, despite pressure, he refused to condemn the teacher of Nestorius.</p> American Catholic Blog Father, I have come to the understanding that Jesus asks very little from us, only that we accept him as our friend and love him and care for one another. How simple! And yet how difficult! Please give me grace not to disappoint him, who has given his all for me. I ask this in Jesus's name, Amen.

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