AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Year of Mercy
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Shopping
Donate
Blog
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Planet 51

By
Joseph McAleer
Source: Catholic News Service


Scene from the animated comedy "Planet 51."
It's "Ozzie and Harriet" with an alien twist on "Planet 51" (TriStar), a delightful animated comedy that represents a clever riff on the cheesy science fiction B-movies of the 1950s.

In a galaxy far, far away little green aliens are living in a "Happy Days"-style suburbia, complete with white picket fences, backyard barbecues, tea parties, dogs chasing mailmen, teen angst, comic books and muscle cars with chrome fins. Adding spice to this innocent world is the local drive-in, showing the latest horror movie where one-eyed monsters called "Humaniacs" launch an invasion and turn everyone into zombies.

It's good clean fun—until a real "alien" drops from the sky in a NASA capsule, and all heck breaks loose.

Enter one unsuspecting and overconfident astronaut, Captain Charles "Chuck" Baker (voice of "The Rock," Dwayne Johnson), and you have a classic fish-out-of-water tale. Chuck befriends Lem (voice of Justin Long), a shy nerdy kid who dreams of other worlds in his job at the planetarium, while pining for the comely Neera (voice of Jessica Biel).

The story shifts to chase-movie mode as Lem and his friends scramble to help this E.T. return home by escaping the clutches of evil Gen. Grawl (voice of Gary Oldman) and his mad-scientist ally, Professor Kipple (voice of John Cleese). Together they run Base 9, the top-secret "Area 51"-type facility where alien ephemera is housed.

Viewers will enjoy the many clever references to sci-fi classics like "Star Wars" and "War of the Worlds."

Practically stealing the movie (and owing a lot to "Wall-E") is Rover, Chuck's robot companion, who lives up to his name, bouncing about like man's best friend. True to his programming, Rover ignores all alien life in search of rock samples. On Planet 51, it rains "rocks and dogs," and amid a shower of pebbles Rover has a hilarious "Singing in the Rain" moment worthy of Gene Kelly.

The first feature of Ilion Animation Studios, based in Spain, and directed by Jorge Blanco, Javier Abad, and Marcos Martinez, "Planet 51" is a funny, fast-paced, and colorfully rendered movie worthy of Pixar status. The screenplay by Joe Stillman ("Shrek" and "Shrek 2") is laden with sight gags and witty one-liners.

"Planet 51" features positive life lessons about friendship, loyalty, and acceptance of others. Chuck comes to realize that having the "right stuff" means risking everything to help a stranger in need. And he tells Lem, "Don't be afraid of the unknown. It's not something to be afraid of. It can be your best friend."

Apart from one unfortunate sexual joke ("That's a funny place for an antenna") and some mildly suggestive humor, this is a wholesome and fun film that can be enjoyed by the entire family.

The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is A-I—general patronage. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG—parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.

*****
McAleer is a guest reviewer for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' Office for Film & Broadcasting.




Thank you for your comments. Editors will review all posts before they are visible on the website.

blog comments powered by Disqus







Peter Chrysologus: A man who vigorously pursues a goal may produce results far beyond his expectations and his intentions. Thus it was with Peter of the Golden Words, as he was called, who as a young man became bishop of Ravenna, the capital of the empire in the West. 
<p>At the time there were abuses and vestiges of paganism evident in his diocese, and these he was determined to battle and overcome. His principal weapon was the short sermon, and many of them have come down to us. They do not contain great originality of thought. They are, however, full of moral applications, sound in doctrine and historically significant in that they reveal Christian life in fifth-century Ravenna. So authentic were the contents of his sermons that, some 13 centuries later, he was declared a doctor of the Church by Pope Benedict XIII. He who had earnestly sought to teach and motivate his own flock was recognized as a teacher of the universal Church. </p><p>In addition to his zeal in the exercise of his office, Peter Chrysologus was distinguished by a fierce loyalty to the Church, not only in its teaching, but in its authority as well. He looked upon learning not as a mere opportunity but as an obligation for all, both as a development of God-given faculties and as a solid support for the worship of God. </p><p>Some time before his death, St. Peter returned to Imola, his birthplace, where he died around A.D. 450.</p> American Catholic Blog What gives manners their social weight? More than simple etiquette, it’s their message: I am treating you with courtesy because I believe you deserve it. Manners talk respect. It’s not a stretch to hear manners as a small piece of kindness.

New Call-to-action

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Mary's Flower - Fuchsia
Mary, nourish my love for you and for Jesus.

Wedding Anniversary
We continue to fall in love again and again throughout our years together.

Summer Vacation
If your summer plans include a trip to the beach, take a child’s delight in this element of creation.

World Youth Day
Encourage young people to pray with and for their contemporaries in Krakow this week.

Sts. Joachim and Anne
Tell your grandparents what they mean to you with this Catholic Greetings e-card.




Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2016