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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Planet 51

By
Joseph McAleer
Source: Catholic News Service


Scene from the animated comedy "Planet 51."
It's "Ozzie and Harriet" with an alien twist on "Planet 51" (TriStar), a delightful animated comedy that represents a clever riff on the cheesy science fiction B-movies of the 1950s.

In a galaxy far, far away little green aliens are living in a "Happy Days"-style suburbia, complete with white picket fences, backyard barbecues, tea parties, dogs chasing mailmen, teen angst, comic books and muscle cars with chrome fins. Adding spice to this innocent world is the local drive-in, showing the latest horror movie where one-eyed monsters called "Humaniacs" launch an invasion and turn everyone into zombies.

It's good clean fun—until a real "alien" drops from the sky in a NASA capsule, and all heck breaks loose.

Enter one unsuspecting and overconfident astronaut, Captain Charles "Chuck" Baker (voice of "The Rock," Dwayne Johnson), and you have a classic fish-out-of-water tale. Chuck befriends Lem (voice of Justin Long), a shy nerdy kid who dreams of other worlds in his job at the planetarium, while pining for the comely Neera (voice of Jessica Biel).

The story shifts to chase-movie mode as Lem and his friends scramble to help this E.T. return home by escaping the clutches of evil Gen. Grawl (voice of Gary Oldman) and his mad-scientist ally, Professor Kipple (voice of John Cleese). Together they run Base 9, the top-secret "Area 51"-type facility where alien ephemera is housed.

Viewers will enjoy the many clever references to sci-fi classics like "Star Wars" and "War of the Worlds."

Practically stealing the movie (and owing a lot to "Wall-E") is Rover, Chuck's robot companion, who lives up to his name, bouncing about like man's best friend. True to his programming, Rover ignores all alien life in search of rock samples. On Planet 51, it rains "rocks and dogs," and amid a shower of pebbles Rover has a hilarious "Singing in the Rain" moment worthy of Gene Kelly.

The first feature of Ilion Animation Studios, based in Spain, and directed by Jorge Blanco, Javier Abad, and Marcos Martinez, "Planet 51" is a funny, fast-paced, and colorfully rendered movie worthy of Pixar status. The screenplay by Joe Stillman ("Shrek" and "Shrek 2") is laden with sight gags and witty one-liners.

"Planet 51" features positive life lessons about friendship, loyalty, and acceptance of others. Chuck comes to realize that having the "right stuff" means risking everything to help a stranger in need. And he tells Lem, "Don't be afraid of the unknown. It's not something to be afraid of. It can be your best friend."

Apart from one unfortunate sexual joke ("That's a funny place for an antenna") and some mildly suggestive humor, this is a wholesome and fun film that can be enjoyed by the entire family.

The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is A-I—general patronage. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG—parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.

*****
McAleer is a guest reviewer for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' Office for Film & Broadcasting.


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John Bosco: John Bosco’s theory of education could well be used in today’s schools. It was a preventive system, rejecting corporal punishment and placing students in surroundings removed from the likelihood of committing sin. He advocated frequent reception of the sacraments of Penance and Holy Communion. He combined catechetical training and fatherly guidance, seeking to unite the spiritual life with one’s work, study and play. 
<p>Encouraged during his youth to become a priest so he could work with young boys, John was ordained in 1841. His service to young people started when he met a poor orphan and instructed him in preparation for receiving Holy Communion. He then gathered young apprentices and taught them catechism. </p><p>After serving as chaplain in a hospice for working girls, John opened the Oratory of St. Francis de Sales for boys. Several wealthy and powerful patrons contributed money, enabling him to provide two workshops for the boys, shoemaking and tailoring. </p><p>By 1856, the institution had grown to 150 boys and had added a printing press for publication of religious and catechetical pamphlets. His interest in vocational education and publishing justify him as patron of young apprentices and Catholic publishers. </p><p>John’s preaching fame spread and by 1850 he had trained his own helpers because of difficulties in retaining young priests. In 1854 he and his followers informally banded together, inspired by St. Francis de Sales [January 24]. </p><p>With Pope Pius IX’s encouragement, John gathered 17 men and founded the Salesians in 1859. Their activity concentrated on education and mission work. Later, he organized a group of Salesian Sisters to assist girls.</p> American Catholic Blog How do you expect to reach your own perfection by leading someone else’s life? His sanctity will never be yours; you must have the humility to work out your own salvation in a darkness where you are absolutely alone.

 
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