AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs

By
John P. McCarthy
Source: Catholic News Service


A character named Flint Lockwood, voiced by Bill Hader, is seen in the animated movie "Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs."
A whimsical animated fantasy that warns against overindulgence and extols the virtues of persistence and ingenuity, "Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs" (Columbia) is uniquely suited to watching in 3-D. Its abundance of bright, eye-popping effects makes donning those cumbersome glasses worthwhile, and the overall message is salubrious enough to recommend seeing it in conventional theaters as well.

Co-writers and directors Chris Miller and Phil Lord lay out a smorgasbord of dazzling visuals that proves entertaining if not always appetizing. Because the colorful picture serves as a reminder that gluttony is a cardinal sin, moviegoers would be well advised to go easy at the concession stand before taking their seats.

Loosely based on the children's book by Judi and Ron Barrett, first published in 1978, the plot centers on a young inventor named Flint Lockwood (voiced by Bill Hader of "Saturday Night Live") who has been ridiculed his entire life for creating numerous odd and unworkable devices. His fortunes change one day when he fashions a machine that makes food fall from the sky.

His handiwork, albeit partly accidental, gives the citizens of his economically depressed hometown of Swallow Falls, located on a remote Atlantic island, a break from their steady diet of sardines. The first storm of cheeseburgers is merely the beginning.

Flint finds a kindred spirit in rookie weather reporter Sam Sparks (voice of Anna Faris), assigned to cover the bizarre climactic phenomenon for a national television network. Sam has chosen to conceal her formidable intellect in order to get ahead professionally. But Flint encourages her to be herself, even giving her a makeover that turns her back into a nerd.

Their date inside a mountain of gelatin is one of the movie's highlights, and a relatively peaceful interlude before conditions spiral out of control.

Citizens become omnivorous, feasting on sirloin steaks, ice cream and anything else they feel like ordering up from Flint. The rapacious mayor seeks to capitalize on the situation by turning the town -- renamed Chewandswallow -- into a tourist mecca. He becomes obese in the process.

Eventually, Flint's machine goes haywire and starts supersizing food, resulting in a gigantic maelstrom that spews spaghetti and meatballs in red sauce. Supported by their respective sidekicks -- a pet monkey and a multitalented cameraman -- Flint and Sam must engage in derring-do if they hope to save the world. Amid the action, Flint's relationship with his old-fashioned father (voice of James Caan) is revived.

It's disappointing that, while the problem of what do with the excess food arises, there's never any mention of using the surplus to feed the poor. On a more positive thematic note, there is an implicit lesson about the dangers of tampering with nature and an over-dependence on science.

Even so, Flint's character may boost respect for responsible scientific learning among young people and foster the spirit of invention. Above all, one hopes this cautionary tale could promote healthier eating habits.

The film contains considerable cartoon violence, some rude expressions, a scatological reference and a few moderately scary action sequences. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is A-II—adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG—parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.

John McCarthy is a guest reviewer for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' Office for Film & Broadcasting.


Search reviews at CatholicMovieReviews.org


Thank you for your comments. Editors will review all posts before they are visible on the website.

blog comments powered by Disqus







Leopold Mandic: Western Christians who are working for greater dialogue with Orthodox Christians may be reaping the fruits of Father Leopold’s prayers.
<p>A native of Croatia, Leopold joined the Capuchin Franciscans and was ordained several years later in spite of several health problems. He could not speak loudly enough to preach publicly. For many years he also suffered from severe arthritis, poor eyesight and a stomach ailment.
</p><p>Leopold taught patrology, the study of the Church Fathers, to the clerics of his province for several years, but he is best known for his work in the confessional, where he sometimes spent 13-15 hours a day. Several bishops sought out his spiritual advice.
</p><p>Leopold’s dream was to go to the Orthodox Christians and work for the reunion of Roman Catholicism and Orthodoxy. His health never permitted it. Leopold often renewed his vow to go to the Eastern Christians; the cause of unity was constantly in his prayers.
</p><p>At a time when Pope Pius XII said that the greatest sin of our time is "to have lost all sense of sin," Leopold had a profound sense of sin and an even firmer sense of God’s grace awaiting human cooperation.
</p><p>Leopold, who lived most of his life in Padua, died on July 30, 1942, and was canonized in 1982.</p> American Catholic Blog Confession is one of the greatest gifts Christ gave to His Church. The sacrament of penance offers you grace that is incomparable in your quest for sanctity.

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
Wisdom for Women

Learn how the life and teachings of St. Teresa Benedicta of the Cross (Edith Stein) serve as a guide for women’s unique vocations today.

A Wild Ride

Enter the world of medieval England in this account of a rare and courageous woman, Margery Kempe, now a saint of the Anglican church.

The Wisdom of Merton
This book distills wisdom from Merton's books and journals on enduring themes which are relevant to readers today.
A Spiritual Banquet!
Whether you are new to cooking, highly experienced, or just enjoy good food, Table of Plenty invites you into experiencing meals as a sacred time.
Pope Francis!
Why did the pope choose the name Francis? Find out in this new book by Gina Loehr.

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Birthday
Subscribers to Catholic Greetings Premium Service can create a personal calendar to remind them of important birthdays.
Mary's Flower - Fuchsia
Mary, nourish my love for you and for Jesus.
Sts. Ann and Joachim
Use this Catholic Greetings e-card to tell your grandparents what they mean to you.
Mary's Flower - Fuchsia
Mary, nourish my love for you and for Jesus.
Summer
God is a beacon in our lives, the steady light that always comes around again.



Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic