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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Love Happens

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service

Serious but overly slick, "Love Happens" (Universal) is a study of personal loss and recovery within a strictly secular context. Despite a complex performance from its star, Aaron Eckhart, and the admirably mature relationship at the heart of the plot, this romantic drama ultimately proves too timid, and too circumscribed by Hollywood conventions, for its own good.

Eckhart plays widowed self-help writer and guru Dr. Burke Ryan. Since the death of his wife in an auto accident three years ago, Burke has dedicated himself to guiding others through the necessary stages of grief and on toward emotional resolution.

As the film opens, Burke reluctantly returns, for the first time, to his wife's hometown of Seattle, where his driven but caring manager Lane (Dan Fogler) has arranged for the successful author—whose book bears the suspiciously pat title "A-Okay"— to give a weeklong seminar.

Between enthusiastically coaching attendees to be open about their feelings, Burke retires to the privacy of his hotel room to brood and down vodka. Though his bitter father-in-law Silver (Martin Sheen)—whose sudden appearance in a line of autograph seekers comes as an unwelcome surprise to Burke—dismisses him as a hypocrite, as subtly portrayed by Eckhart, Burke comes across instead as a caregiver genuinely dedicated to his work, but unable, as yet, to follow his own advice.

After Burke literally bumps into Eloise (Jennifer Aniston), a local florist working on an arrangement in the hotel hallway, the two share an awkward, nearly silent dinner date. The redemptive bond that eventually develops—despite this less-than-promising start—is refreshingly chaste, though perhaps for negative reasons, since Burke is still repressing himself and Eloise is on the rebound from a characteristically self-destructive affair with a philandering musician.

Whatever their motives for restraint, as Eloise encourages Burke to confront his past, and he wears away at her defenses, the groundwork is laid for a lasting, friendship-based affinity.

But, except through a moving performance by John Carroll Lynch as Walter, a hesitant seminar participant coming to grips with the death of his young son, director and co-writer (with Mike Thompson) Brandon Camp seems content, in his feature debut, to skirt the shores of bereavement, rather than sound its depths.

Thus, at one point, Burke gazes longingly at a video of his wife but fails to break down in a way that might be unsettlingly—but more memorably—realistic. And some late-reel shenanigans that see Burke sneaking into his in-laws' house are both shopworn and incongruous.

Catholic viewers, of course, will be struck by the inadequacy of Burke's New Age-tinted rhetoric as a substitute for faith in the promise of the Resurrection. And that may be another reason for the script's excessive caution. As St. Thomas Aquinas taught: "From nature springs the fear of death; from grace springs audacity."

The film contains a half-dozen uses of profanity, occasional crude and crass language, a few sexual jokes and an obscene gesture. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is A-III—adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13 —parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

 Mulderig is on the staff of the Office for Film & Broadcasting of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.


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Thomas the Apostle: Poor Thomas! He made one remark and has been branded as “Doubting Thomas” ever since. But if he doubted, he also believed. He made what is certainly the most explicit statement of faith in the New Testament: “My Lord and My God!” (see John 20:24-28) and, in so expressing his faith, gave Christians a prayer that will be said till the end of time. He also occasioned a compliment from Jesus to all later Christians: “Have you come to believe because you have seen me? Blessed are those who have not seen and have believed” (John 20:29). 
<p>Thomas should be equally well known for his courage. Perhaps what he said was impetuous—since he ran, like the rest, at the showdown—but he can scarcely have been insincere when he expressed his willingness to die with Jesus. The occasion was when Jesus proposed to go to Bethany after Lazarus had died. Since Bethany was near Jerusalem, this meant walking into the very midst of his enemies and to almost certain death. Realizing this, Thomas said to the other apostles, “Let us also go to die with him” (John 11:16b).</p> American Catholic Blog Slow down as you make the Sign of the Cross. Intentionally purify your mind and your heart, and ask God to strengthen you to carry his love to the world.

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