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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Sorority Row

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service

Early on in the cut-rate horror tale "Sorority Row" (Summit), a hard-drinking coed who goes by the poetic moniker Chugs (Margo Harshman) watches via computer cam as her brother Garrett (Matt O'Leary) beds Megan (Audrina Patridge), one of her sorority sisters whom Garrett has drugged to make her more cooperative. This uplifting scene pretty much sets the tone for the old-fashioned exercise in exploitation that follows.

The sketchy plot hinges on the fact that Garrett is Megan's ex-boyfriend whom she dumped for cheating. Out for revenge, she and some of her other sisters—Cassidy (Briana Evigan), Jessica (Leah Pipes), Ellie (Rumer Willis) and Claire (Jamie Chung)—have concocted a prank that involves convincing Garrett that the supposed date-rape pills he gave Megan (in fact just vitamins supplied by the girls) have poisoned and killed her.

For reasons too boring to detail, the trick goes terribly wrong, and Megan ends up really and most sincerely dead. Garrett and the girls agree to conceal the mishap by dumping Megan's body and claiming she simply disappeared. But their coverup starts to unravel several months later as the female members of the guilty group fall prey, one by one, to a black-robed slasher.

As directed by Stewart Hendler, the gruesome proceedings are interspersed with "Animal House"-style high jinks, gratuitous nudity (predictably, the stalker claims one of his victims in the sorority showers) and the early stages of a number of utterly promiscuous sexual encounters.

The film contains frequent bloody violence, brief nongraphic nonmarital sexual activity, upper female and rear nudity, a couple of profanities, and much rough and crude language. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is O—morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R—restricted; under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

Mulderig is on the staff of the Office for Film & Broadcasting of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.




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Cyril of Alexandria: Saints are not born with halos around their heads. Cyril, recognized as a great teacher of the Church, began his career as archbishop of Alexandria, Egypt, with impulsive, often violent, actions. He pillaged and closed the churches of the Novatian heretics (who required those who denied the faith to be rebaptized), participated in the deposing of St. John Chrysostom (September 13) and confiscated Jewish property, expelling the Jews from Alexandria in retaliation for their attacks on Christians. 
<p>Cyril’s importance for theology and Church history lies in his championing the cause of orthodoxy against the heresy of Nestorius, who taught that in Christ there were two persons, one human and one divine.</p><p>The controversy centered around the two natures in Christ. Nestorius would not agree to the title “God-bearer” for Mary (January 1). He preferred “Christ-bearer,” saying there are two distinct persons in Christ (divine and human) joined only by a moral union. He said Mary was not the mother of God but only of the man Christ, whose humanity was only a temple of God. Nestorianism implied that the humanity of Christ was a mere disguise. </p><p>Presiding as the pope’s representative at the Council of Ephesus (431), Cyril condemned Nestorianism and proclaimed Mary truly the “God-bearer” (the mother of the one Person who is truly God and truly human). In the confusion that followed, Cyril was deposed and imprisoned for three months, after which he was welcomed back to Alexandria as a second Athanasius (the champion against Arianism). </p><p>Besides needing to soften some of his opposition to those who had sided with Nestorius, Cyril had difficulties with some of his own allies, who thought he had gone too far, sacrificing not only language but orthodoxy. Until his death, his policy of moderation kept his extreme partisans under control. On his deathbed, despite pressure, he refused to condemn the teacher of Nestorius.</p> American Catholic Blog Father, I have come to the understanding that Jesus asks very little from us, only that we accept him as our friend and love him and care for one another. How simple! And yet how difficult! Please give me grace not to disappoint him, who has given his all for me. I ask this in Jesus's name, Amen.

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