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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Halloween II

By
Kurt Jensen
Source: Catholic News Service


Sheri Moon Zombie and Chase Vanek star in a scene from the movie "Halloween II."
About halfway through "Halloween II" (Dimension), two girls are discussing an upcoming Halloween party with a "Rocky Horror Picture Show" theme, and one remarks, "It's so lame, it's cool again."
 
Not this movie. It's completely lame, and it's so not cool again to see masked, booted and surprisingly durable cutlery whiz Michael Myers (Tyler Mane) shuffle through his desultory homicidal paces out of his twisted need for a reunion with his grungy sister, Laurie (Scout Taylor-Compton). Laurie suffers from bad dreams—much of the violence occurs in those before she wakes up howling—but she's too dimwitted and foulmouthed to be a sympathetic character.
 
Writer-director Rob Zombie, who took over the old "Halloween" franchise of the 1980s, doesn't give Michael anything original to do besides smash walls with a hatchet and slice up victims, while casting his wife, Sheri Moon Zombie, as Michael's ghostly, cliche-spouting mother Deborah.
 
No one goes to a horror film to appreciate nuanced acting, but Zombie settles for stale, predictable setups and a conclusion you can see coming long before the film's 101 minutes lurch to a halt.
 
The film contains strong violent content, including multiple stabbings, a strangling and a fatal stomping, fleeting upper female nudity, pervasive rough and crass language and occasional sexual banter. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is O—morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R—restricted; under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.
 
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Jensen is a guest reviewer for the Office for Film & Broadcasting of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.




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Joseph Benedict Cottolengo: In some ways Joseph exemplified St. Francis’ advice, "Let us begin to serve the Lord God, for up to now we have made little or no progress" (<i>1 Celano, </i>#103). 
<p>Joseph was the eldest of 12 children. Born in Piedmont, he was ordained for the Diocese of Turin in 1811. Frail health and difficulty in school were obstacles he overcame to reach ordination. </p><p>During Joseph’s lifetime Italy was torn by civil war while the poor and the sick suffered from neglect. Inspired by reading the life of St. Vincent de Paul and moved by the human suffering all around him, Joseph rented some rooms to nurse the sick of his parish and recruited local young women to serve as staff. </p><p>In 1832 at Voldocco, Joseph founded the House of Providence which served many different groups (the sick, the elderly, students, the mentally ill, the blind). All of this was financed by contributions. Popularly called "the University of Charity," this testimonial to God’s goodness was serving 8,000 people by the time of Joseph’s beatification in 1917. </p><p>To carry on his work, Joseph organized two religious communities, the Brothers of St. Vincent de Paul and the Sisters of St. Vincent de Paul. Joseph, who had joined the Secular Franciscans as a young man, was canonized in 1934.</p> American Catholic Blog The image of God! This is what it means to be human! We are not just a bunch of cells randomly thrown together by some impersonal forces. Rather, we reflect an eternal God who knew us from before we were made and purposely called us into being.

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