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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Ponyo

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service


This is a scene from the animated movie "Ponyo."
An unabashed celebration of the innocence and wonder of childhood, as well as of the imaginative possibilities that can endure well beyond it, "Ponyo" (Disney) is a treat for youthful spirits of every age. This enchanting English-language version of a Japanese animated fable, inspired by Hans Christian Anderson's "The Little Mermaid," was originally written and directed by Hayao Miyazaki, a recognized master of the genre.
 
As adapted by directors John Lasseter, Brad Lewis and Peter Sohn, the mythic tale is set in motion when a determined little goldfish named Ponyo (voice of Noah Cyrus, sister of actress-singer Miley Cyrus) decides to escape the underwater realm of her domineering father, Fujimoto (voice of Liam Neeson)—a half-human wizard embittered against his fellow human beings by their abuse of nature—to explore the world beyond.
 
Reaching shore, she comes under the protection of Sosuke (voice of the Jonas Brothers' younger sibling Frankie Jonas), a plucky, affectionate 5-year-old boy. With his father Koichi (voice of Matt Damon), a merchant sailor often away at sea, Sosuke is used to providing moral support to his lonely mother Lisa (voice of Tina Fey). He's also a favorite with the residents of the nursing home where Lisa works, a trio of them voiced by Cloris Leachman, Lily Tomlin and Betty White.
 
Sosuke and Ponyo bond immediately. But, with Fujimoto resolved to use his supernatural powers to reclaim his daughter, Sosuke's love for her will be put to the test in a series of adventures, both before and after Ponyo's mysterious transformation into a little girl.
 
Japanese cultural elements incorporated into the story—the script was adapted by Melissa Mathison—include brief scenes of Shinto prayer and the divine status of Ponyo's mother, Gran Mamare (voice of Cate Blanchett), identified in English as the "goddess of the sea."
 
But the underlying moral messages, such as the repeated admonition to judge by substance rather than appearance and a deftly delivered warning against environmental carelessness, are universal.
 
The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is A-I—general patronage. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is G—general audiences; all ages admitted.
 
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Mulderig is on the staff of the Office for Film & Broadcasting of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.




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Martha: Martha, Mary and their brother Lazarus were evidently close friends of Jesus. He came to their home simply as a welcomed guest, rather than as one celebrating the conversion of a sinner like Zacchaeus or one unceremoniously received by a suspicious Pharisee. The sisters feel free to call on Jesus at their brother’s death, even though a return to Judea at that time seems almost certain death. 
<p>No doubt Martha was an active sort of person. On one occasion (see Luke 10:38-42) she prepares the meal for Jesus and possibly his fellow guests and forthrightly states the obvious: All hands should pitch in to help with the dinner. </p><p>Yet, as biblical scholar Father John McKenzie points out, she need not be rated as an “unrecollected activist.” The evangelist is emphasizing what our Lord said on several occasions about the primacy of the spiritual: “...[D]o not worry about your life, what you will eat [or drink], or about your body, what you will wear…. But seek first the kingdom [of God] and his righteousness” (Matthew 6:25b, 33a); “One does not live by bread alone” (Luke 4:4b); “Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for righteousness…” (Matthew 5:6a). </p><p>Martha’s great glory is her simple and strong statement of faith in Jesus after her brother’s death. “Jesus told her, ‘I am the resurrection and the life; whoever believes in me, even if he dies, will live, and everyone who lives and believes in me will never die. Do you believe this?’ She said to him, ‘Yes, Lord. I have come to believe that you are the Messiah, the Son of God, the one who is coming into the world’” (John 11:25-27).</p> American Catholic Blog Anger and inconsistency feed each other. Anger in a parent can lead to erratic discipline, and erratic discipline promotes anger and frustration. Good parents work hard to discipline with a level head. The best parents though, even after many years or many kids, are still working on the level-headed part.

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