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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

District 9

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service


Sharlto Copley stars in a scene from the movie "District 9."
"District 9" (TriStar) is an exceedingly violent yet powerful science fiction parable about the dangers of prejudice and societal indifference.
 
Set in an alternate version of contemporary South Africa two decades after the arrival in Johannesburg of an unwelcome race of human-size but insect-shaped aliens, director and co-writer (with Terri Tatchell) Neill Blomkamp's unflinchingly harsh feature debut has specific applications to the country of his birth—he now lives in Canada—but far broader implications about human nature in general.
 
As we learn from a series of mock-documentary broadcasts and interviews, the extraterrestrials, stranded on earth by a mechanical problem with their spacecraft, quickly became a source of social tension since—besides being repulsive by human standards—the "prawns," as they come to be called derisively, are perceived as unintelligent and feckless.
 
So they've been forcibly confined in the titular ghetto where makeshift shanties and lawless streets recall the townships of the apartheid era.
 
Bowing to public pressure to isolate the visitors even further, the government charges a conglomerate called Multi-National United with the task of relocating them to a vast concentration camp. Thanks to family connections, Wikus van der Merwe (Sharlto Copley), a timid, irksome MNU bureaucrat, is placed at the head of this operation. The only likable thing about Wikus is his idealistic love for his wife, Tania (Vanessa Haywood).
 
Backed by MNU's paramilitary forces, Wikus begins to carry out the technically legal evictions with a dismal combination of condescension and ruthlessness. But an accident with an unidentified chemical he finds in one of the shacks suddenly turns him into a fugitive from the system he previously served.
 
While on the run, Wikus, whose experiences as an outcast gradually transform his thinking, allies himself with an alien who has been given the human name Christopher Johnson (voice of Jason Cope).
 
Besides segregation and colonialism—the assignment of virtually interchangeable names to the aliens conjures up what it must have been like for native people to receive unwanted names in their conquerors' language—the drama can also be seen as a critique of the more recent problem of South African xenophobia toward migrant workers from other parts of the continent.
 
Scenes of the eventual showdown between some of the aliens and their human oppressors are so graphically bloody that they would normally warrant an "O" classification, especially in conjunction with the constant use of the F-word throughout the dialogue.
 
But for all its grittiness, this tale of physical and moral metamorphosis—propelled by Copley's intense performance—offers an incisive study of the need for universal solidarity and a portrait of marital love that at least some adult viewers may find valuable.
 
The film contains considerable gory violence, including brief torture, pervasive rough and some crude language, and a few sexual references. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is L—limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R—restricted: under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.
 
- - -
 
Mulderig is on the staff of the Office for Film & Broadcasting of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.


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Andrew Kim Taegon, Paul Chong Hasang and Companions: This first native Korean priest was the son of Korean converts. His father, Ignatius Kim, was martyred during the persecution of 1839 and was beatified in 1925. After Baptism at the age of 15, Andrew traveled 1,300 miles to the seminary in Macao, China. After six years he managed to return to his country through Manchuria. That same year he crossed the Yellow Sea to Shanghai and was ordained a priest. Back home again, he was assigned to arrange for more missionaries to enter by a water route that would elude the border patrol. He was arrested, tortured and finally beheaded at the Han River near Seoul, the capital. Paul Chong Hasang was a lay apostle and married man, aged 45. 
<p>Christianity came to Korea during the Japanese invasion in 1592 when some Koreans were baptized, probably by Christian Japanese soldiers. Evangelization was difficult because Korea refused all contact with the outside world except for bringing taxes to Beijing annually. On one of these occasions, around 1777, Christian literature obtained from Jesuits in China led educated Korean Christians to study. A home Church began. When a Chinese priest managed to enter secretly a dozen years later, he found 4,000 Catholics, none of whom had ever seen a priest. Seven years later there were 10,000 Catholics. Religious freedom came in 1883. </p><p>When Pope John Paul II visited Korea in 1984 he canonized, besides Andrew and Paul, 98 Koreans and three French missionaries who had been martyred between 1839 and 1867. Among them were bishops and priests, but for the most part they were lay persons: 47 women, 45 men. </p><p>Among the martyrs in 1839 was Columba Kim, an unmarried woman of 26. She was put in prison, pierced with hot tools and seared with burning coals. She and her sister Agnes were disrobed and kept for two days in a cell with condemned criminals, but were not molested. After Columba complained about the indignity, no more women were subjected to it. The two were beheaded. A boy of 13, Peter Ryou, had his flesh so badly torn that he could pull off pieces and throw them at the judges. He was killed by strangulation. Protase Chong, a 41-year-old noble, apostatized under torture and was freed. Later he came back, confessed his faith and was tortured to death. </p><p>Today, there are almost 5.1 million Catholics in Korea.</p> American Catholic Blog We never think of connecting violence with our tongues. But the first weapon, the most cruel weapon, is the tongue. Examine what part your tongue has played in creating peace or violence. We can really wound a person, we can kill a person, with our tongue.

 
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